Just a thought...

Discussion in 'Strings' started by Chanto, Jul 10, 2011.

  1. Chanto

    Chanto Rookie

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    Couldn't you play strings with terrible tension loss to your advantage? The tension loss should flat-line over some time, so you have some continuity there. Couldn't you just string it a tad higher and wait or something?

    It's never thrown out there, so I just want to know if anyone else has ever thought of this as a viable option to countering tension issues.
     
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  2. bms2011

    bms2011 Banned

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    Well, that's what most professional stringers do. If a player wants his racket strung at 55 pounds, they string it at 57 (or another tension depending on the amount the type of string) because of the initial string tension drop. The only reason that tension loss has an affect on strings is usually tension loss is a cause of playing a lot which makes the strings die out. That's is why tension loss is bad. But, yes I have thought about that before.
     
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  3. 2kJosh

    2kJosh New User

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    It might work but then again the tension may just keep on droping in all strings till it hits a specific point, time to hit the science books.
     
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  4. Jerry Seinfeld

    Jerry Seinfeld Professional

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    So not true.
     
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  5. fgs

    fgs Hall of Fame

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    initial tension loss is in the most cases accounted for by both the players and the stringers. of course a stringer won't string at 59 when the player/client instructs him to string at 57.
    what you cannot account for is the secondary tension loss which usually comes along with the string losing it's resiliency and going dead - that is something you cannot account for in any other way but cutting it out and replacing it, if you haven't broken it.
     
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  6. travlerajm

    travlerajm Hall of Fame

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    I believe what people call "going dead" is actually when the string loses it's lubricity, so that it doesn't snap back to its position. An example of a string that loses its lubricity after a few hours is Luxilon ALU.

    Since some strings never lose their lubricity, they never "go dead."
    An example of this type of string is Prince Tournament Poly. It loses tension like any other poly, but it stays slippery. I've found that if I string it quite tight (as a cross with my Kevlar main), it loses tension over the first few hours, and then plays consistently for many hours after that. But it certainly doesn't lose its resilience - the string setup bites the ball more at the end of its life than when it's fresh.
     
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  7. bms2011

    bms2011 Banned

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    Yes. For some players that is exactly what they do. If a player is having a best of 5 match, they do not want the tension to be 2 pounds lower than the desired tension of all the rackets after 3 hours into the match. If you're going to try and prove me wrong or at least have some evidence. It's pathetic how much people like you jump straight to conclusions about people being wrong. I don't care if you prove me wrong as long as you have evidence to prove it.
     
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  8. pvaudio

    pvaudio Legend

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    Close. It's a loss of elasticity, not lubricity.
     
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