Just bought a pro staff 6.0 - st vincent

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by Elwood, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. Elwood

    Elwood Rookie

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    I look forward to putting new string on it and giving it a go. I have never played a graphite frame or a Wilson for that matter.

    I hope I like it.
     
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  2. Elwood

    Elwood Rookie

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    Frame says to string at 70-75 pounds. Is that really what i should string it at? I usually go for lower tension.

    What tension do you string your ps, if you own one?
     
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  3. Jay_The_Nomad

    Jay_The_Nomad Professional

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    Nice! Now go play and do give me some feedback. What is your usual racquet by the way? I've being eyeing the prostaff 85 for a while for collectibility reasons and occasional play.
     
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  4. dak95_00

    dak95_00 Professional

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    String it at your normal tension or maybe even a few lbs lower due to the fact that this is such a low power frame.

    (In my grandpa voice)
    Back in the old days and early days of graphite and steel, manufacturers recommended very high tensions because it was possible and it was thought that stiffer was better. You'll tear your arm up if you play at the super high tension.
     
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  5. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Is somebody going to mention this must be a Largehead or even a 125 to have that tension range?
     
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  6. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

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    Correctly spoken Coachrick....
    The PS 85 has a recommended tension between 55 and 65 lbs.
     
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  7. millicurie999

    millicurie999 Semi-Pro

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    Good call. I have both the PS 6.0 85 and the 95. They don't play similar at all. If the OP has the large head, I doubt it will feel anything like the 85.
     
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  8. jonestim

    jonestim Professional

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    The recommendation changed over the years. According to http://thetenniswiki.com/Wilson+Pro+Staff+6.0+Original+Mid+85 the Chicago and early St. Vincent recommended 65-70. Fairly early on at St Vincent they lowered it to 55-65, and then the last ones from there were 50-60.

    I have two St Vincents - an early bumperless that says 65-70 and a late one that says 50-60.
     
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  9. Elwood

    Elwood Rookie

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    It is a bumperless, largehead.

    I play with a MG Radical OS and sometimes a Boris Becker Legend.

    I have been experiencing shoulder pain (im 45) with the BB so I am looking to get a redondo or something. The MG is almost too light at times but very nice. I saw the largehead PS and figured I would try it. I don't know a thing about it.

    I will say the shoulder pain is not just with tennis. And is only on occasion. I just began wondering what a lower flex rating would do. The MG is pretty low and has the 18x20. The redondo has the same plus some extra mass. I haven't played graphite before so Im looking forward to it.

    And as I look for a redondo I guess I will be playing with a PS.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
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  10. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    I can't think of anything other than pure size that would make the PS Largehead particularly 'good' for your shoulder :( . If you NEED a 110 to hit serves and overheads, we need to talk. ;) If the damage is done on groundies, I just don't see the PS being all that helpful unless strung low with nat gut. It MIGHT just plain fit you and all may be well, so I'm not saying you shouldn't try it.

    Most important thing I did to get through a torn deltoid(picking up/dragging something really unwieldy) and later on just plain shoulder pain from too many hours on the court was: Being very careful how I slept on 'that' side. As with TE, it's important to get all the blood flow you can during rest-- and sleeping ON that arm(as a side-sleeper) or with that arm under your head/pillow, you can really cut down on the blood flow through the shoulder, never mind the ill-placed/timed constriction of the muscles and soft tissues. Take care.
     
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  11. Elwood

    Elwood Rookie

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    Coachrick,
    Thanks for the info. The racket was a whim purchase and not meant to solve anything other than curiosity. I actually prefer a 98 inch head. Interestingly enough all my Radicals have been OS. If I tried the Midplus i might really like it.

    I will probably trade this racket for something anyway. Unless I end up really liking it.

    I do avoid sleeping on that shoulder. It only hurts after I finish playing and then only sometimes.
     
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  12. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    This is true. I had a Chicago version and the recommended tension was indeed "65-70 lbs.".
     
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  13. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    70# --- OUCH and double-OUCH!
     
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  14. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    With a very large-headed racket and gut strings, 72 lbs or so isn't that tight. It's probably what you need to not have trampolining when hitting flat.
     
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  15. Elwood

    Elwood Rookie

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    So how does a graphite racket play? Which compounds are arm friendly or is it the 100% graphite that is arm friendly?
     
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  16. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Of course, I was responding to the 85 sq in frames with the early recommendation of 70 at the top end. Ouch just thinking about it! :)
     
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  17. Elwood

    Elwood Rookie

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    So I received the racket today and right out of the box I see stress fractures at the throat. Bummer. I will be returning it. Oh well.

    I really want a 12oz, 56-59 flex, 18x20 string pattern racket anyway.
     
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  18. Specialjustin

    Specialjustin New User

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    Surely Pro Kennex make something that fits those criteria?
     
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  19. Elwood

    Elwood Rookie

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    heritage c, redondo
     
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  20. bugeyed

    bugeyed Semi-Pro

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    Your other racquets are graphite! As a rule, the more graphite in the composition, the stiffer the racquet & stiff = not friendly.....usually.

    Cheers,
    kev
     
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  21. ATP100

    ATP100 Professional

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    Pause, remember what kind of string we were playing with back then.
     
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  22. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Leoina 66 ?
    Yawn, blech and OUCH !
     
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  23. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    When the small tennis/ski shop I was working for part time closed down two decades ago, I bought all the small bits from the back shop that I could afford with my minimum wage savings. All these years later, I am still only half way through my second reel of "Tuff-Tite". At the leisurely pace I've been going, along with a growing supply of sticks from that era that came as a result of my recent addiction to thrifting, I will be stuck in "back then" heaven (or hell?) forever.

    [​IMG]
     
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  24. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    That's QUITE a collection from the '70s>...including the very first machine I ever used...ThreeLastic(IIRC) . That really brings back memories!Blue Star, Wintex and more tubing than you'll need in a lifetime! Wow!

    The OS280 string is newer, of course. I sold dozens of sets of that 'root beer' string that matched nicely in the Volkl V-1 10A and a few Hammers.

    Plenty of classic replacement grips and a very early set of String a Lings...cool!

    You should hybrid the TuffTite with the blue spiral nylon for a custom blast from the past! :)
     
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  25. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    Figured you would enjoy these, Coach :)

    The Threelastic Allround had actually been collecting dust in the store attic, likely for a decade or more. I never knew it was there until we were clearing the place out for the next tenant. I vaguely remember paying $100 for it, which was a king's ransom for me back then, and I was kinda pissed that they would make me pay so much for something that was about to go to the metal recycler. Still, I knew I had no other viable options if I were to have my own machine... I certainly couldn't have afforded, nor transported in my Toyota Starlet, the big Serrano that I worked with during those years.

    To this day I am not entirely sure what the graduation marks on the weight lever actually correspond to. The lowest mark near the base reads "5 g", the highest one reads "30 g". Since I never learned the proper way to use this machine, I've had to rely almost entirely on "touch" to get the right tension, and used a tension gauge only to verify that I was in the ball park.

    It's all very primitive, but fun :)
     
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  26. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Do you have the rigid bar with the clamp attached or flying clamps? We had the one bar clamp and would use a 'starting clamp' to hold the mains 3-4 strings outside the throat and string the remaining 2/3rds of the mains, then release the starting clamp and finish the mains. The 'new' machine back then was the Serrano and we had an older Oliver, similar to the Serrano. I'm surprised I ever learned to string on that ThreeLastic...it was only about two notches beyond a round dowel(broomstick) and an awl!!!

    By the bye, I don't think I've ever seen anyone finish off a reel like your blue spiral is on(as designed). Often the plastic 'X' breaks or the string just plain tangles itself in a mess. Careful... if you ever decide to use it;) .

    Your Starlet and my '79 Fiat Strada would have made a great pair...neither one could carry a Serrano, I reckon. Ah, the good old days! :)
     
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  27. georgeyew

    georgeyew Rookie

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    Wow, nice Fila stencil.
     
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