keeping racquet out in front on volleys

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by moosryan, Jun 22, 2005.

  1. moosryan

    moosryan Hall of Fame

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    I have trouble keeping the racquet out in front of my body on forehand volleys. Any tips?

    thanks,
    moos.
     
    #1
  2. eagle

    eagle Hall of Fame

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    Hi moos,

    I try to hold the racquet about waist high and in front of me.

    r,
    eagle
     
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  3. Achillesg

    Achillesg New User

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    Personally, I find that keeping the volley in front is more important on the backhand side than on the forehand. I'm quite comfortable playing a forehand volley more to the side. For me, the lower the volley, the more important it is to take it in front. In no circumstance can you let the volley get behind you, but that's true with 99% of all shots with the exception of running down a baseline lob or something like that.


    Edit: At 4.5, you're a better player than I am, so my comments may not be worth much. But I saw your sig said SW forehand grip -you do change that to continental for your volleys, right? Otherwise I don't see how you could have a chance on a reflex volley.
     
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  4. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    You probably need to change your grips. Hold the racket out infront of your body with the grip that feels comfortable and then work on using that grip and volley. It will take time to strenghten but you will be a good volleyer after getting it correct.
    Good luck !
     
    #4
  5. ZhangM58

    ZhangM58 Rookie

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    I use to have the same problem, try keeping the racquet close to your face when vollying. Use your feet as a power source. This should improve your volly. Good luck!
     
    #5
  6. ohplease

    ohplease Professional

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    You're probably turning your shoulders too much. Jabbing your elbow into your side will make your volley much more about the forearm instead of the shoulder, and prevent you from taking the racket too far back. It might also help to think about driving through the volley on the forehand side with your dominant leg (right if right-handed) - that'll engage that hip and keep you from twisting the racket face and your whole body back and around too much.

    During practice, try over-correcting with no shoulder turn at all - have your hips and shoulders parallel to the net.
     
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  7. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Use your peripheral vision to see the racquet. Practice with a slow feed to develop your technique.
     
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  8. moosryan

    moosryan Hall of Fame

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    yeah i do change do a continental on volleys, can't imagine doing it any other way. i have decent volleys i just tend to take the racquet back behind me which cause problems when the ball is hit hard.
     
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  9. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    If you practice with your elbows close to your body and turn from the shoulders you can easily keep the racquet within your peripheral vision. This means no wrist movement and elbow movement. It is a short punch like motion you are developing.
     
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  10. twocents

    twocents Rookie

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    After reading and seeing a lot of tapes I thought you were supposed to turn your shoulders on BOTH forehand and backhand volleys. I play mostly (4.0/4.5)doubles and because my serve isn't that great my volleys are pretty good.
    After going to a very good camp a couple months ago they told us to do turn your shoulders ONLY on the Backhand volley (which I did anyhow - my backhand volley is good). On the forehand volley they said to do something completely different than what I had ever seen/heard: First face forward and and put both hands in front of you like your telling someone to stop (about chest level) with both hands out front. Do not turn your shoulders. Use your left leg to step into the ball and use the left hand for balance. They said to volley with your legs. If you crossover First with your left leg, your right shoulder turns backwards automatically which you don't want. Also, keep your hands high because it's easier to drop them for low volleys than to raise them for high volleys.
    You need to keep your hands always out in front like having an innertube around your chest.Another visual would be like holding a garbage can lid out in front of you and either crossing over with your left foot for a forehand volley or crossing over with your right foot for a backhand volley.
    I now can nail my forehand volleys like my backhand volleys instead of just placing them at my opponents feet. Whatever works. Good luck !!!
     
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  11. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Well I have contributed many posts on stepping out with the foot closest to the ball to prevent OVER rotation and the inability to handle balls hit to you on boths sides simultaeneously.

    The volley should have shoulder rotation so that the body is facing towards thr 45 degree angle. What you want to reduce is excessive movement at the lower links of the arm - the elbow and wrist.
     
    #11
  12. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Yes, and they have been very good - folks should do a search and check them out.

    I do not like the idea of NOT rotating the shoulders, as someone else suggested on the forehand volley - seems to me that you need the unit turn and without it there is just too much "arm" involved.

    As a doubles player, I enjoy the volley and practice it constantly - like in mini-tennis.
     
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  13. dennis10is

    dennis10is Banned

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    Volleys are my favorite stroke and I've spent countless hours practicing against the wall standing very close to it and hitting volleys continously. That's to develop hand and eye coordination for my technique but really, a real life volley is much tougher.

    What I do it track the ball and predict exactly where I will want to make contact with the ball, this space has to be in front of me and as far and as I as I think can get do. Then the moment that I "see" in my mind's eye where that piont is, I move my racket head directly towards it while starting to aim the racket head to aim where I want to direct the ball. At the same time, I move my body into the proper position. Naturally, this seeing happens very, very quickly. This is something that only lots of practice and experience will enable you to do it.

    this is a bit different than say, first you move your body and then the last thing is to make a short punch. I move my racket first to the ball, that's my first priority and then move the rest of my body to get into proper position. So that if it is so fast as in doubles, at least I have a chance to get my racket on it and since my racket is always in front of me there is a decent chance I make the volley.

    All classic form applies, racket held in front, movement of racket can never be backward, wrist as much below racket face as possible, firm wrist, aim with racket face and short punch.

    So, here is an example. The dipping ball right at me. My racket drop down while my wrist is still below my racket face, my body lowers itself my bend my knees and scooting side ways, while may racket is as stationary as possible. Literally, my racket is stationary and my body moves around it. If I have time, meaning my body is in position, I'll have the little step in, if not, I have a little one-two inch punch.

    that's my little trick for myself. It works for me very well but I've never had problems with excessive racket motion during volleys but the quality of my contact and firmness improved greatly after I started doing this.

    Hope it helps.
     
    #13
  14. twocents

    twocents Rookie

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    dennis10is,
    I agree 100%. It works for me too as I posted above (a little differently). Putting the hands out front first and then stepping into the ball works. I could never figure out before why my FOREHAND volley sucked. It was because I would rotate my shoulders First and then punch the ball. Position racket first then move your body around it. Like they say "volley with your feet".
     
    #14
  15. Marius_Hancu

    Marius_Hancu G.O.A.T.

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    try to keep your elbows in your peripheral view, hands more extended at the elbows (but not locked), in the ready phase
     
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