Kick/Slice without using Eastern BH Grip

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by kninetik, Jul 28, 2004.

  1. kninetik

    kninetik Rookie

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    162
    Everyone seems to advocate and use the Eastern BH for any type of spin serve. I cant for the life of me get used to that grip for serving. Everything about it just feels awkward and wrong. I frame just about every attempt at the kick serve which I am in progress of learning. I have a lot more success using the continental grip on spin type serves. However, I rarely ever see anyone praising that method. Any disadvantages to using the continental? Should I stick with what I am comfortable with or keep at it with the Eastern BH grip... Thanks
     
    #1
  2. TwistServe

    TwistServe Guest

    You can still serve well with a continental grip.. I find that kick serves with continental grip are more penetrating, while kick serves with eastern bgrip gives some twist element but not as penetrating..

    Slices are definitely better with continental.
     
    #2
  3. Power Game

    Power Game Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Messages:
    1,151
    Stick with continental. Only a few pros use backhand grips for serves, most use continental and have huge kick and slice serves
     
    #3
  4. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    Wrong. Many pros use alternating grips to hit their spin serves. The Eastern backhand grip is an excellent grip to hit serves with. So is the continental.

    You might have to adjust your wrist position to get it to feel better. It takes practice to get used to it. Cant just hit a few serves and call it quits. If I can do it you can do it.

    If I serve a lot of continental style serves and then go to the eastern or extreme eastern grip, it feels a little different. But I am used to it so I quickly adjust.

    Try moving your wrist around so the racquet position feels a little n better.

    For spin serve, it is one of the best grips to learn, especially for twisty's and toppy's!
     
    #4
  5. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Messages:
    12,740
    Location:
    USA
    The backhand grip is the greatest second serve grip ever!
     
    #5
  6. Ryoma

    Ryoma Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    335
    I have the same experience as kninetik, it feels like using the wrong side of the backhand to hit a forehand. I did have a little success if I switch to a more continental grip. One question though, with the kick serve/topspin serve, how high should a kick serve clear the net? Like if I want to have my kick serve bounce over the opponent's head, how high should the ball clear the net?
     
    #6
  7. Power Game

    Power Game Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Messages:
    1,151
    Hmmm. Can you please give me some examples? I know that many pros and good players shift their grip a little towards the backhand side for the spin serves, but not many make the full turn to the eastern backhand grip (with the knuckle on the top bevel).
     
    #7
  8. GrahamIsSuper

    GrahamIsSuper Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Messages:
    504
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    It probbly feels so unnatural to you guys because you are trying to drastically change your grip suddenly. On a serve, this is about as dumb as trying to play left handed groundstrokes. You have to GRADUALLY rotate over from a continental grip. Hit 20-30 serves with your normal continental, and slowly rotate over more to your eastern. When i say slowly, i mean less than a cetimeter at a time. This is a HUGE adjustment to just go out and do without slowly adjusting.

    If my Eastern Grip kicks or twists arent going well, I rotate back to a more continental grip for consistancy. I however, use eastern on every type of serve I hit, regardless of slice, flat, twist, or top spin. I rotate my body and shoulders different ways depending on the serve. Its a good strategy to use, because experienced players watch your service motion very closely and will pick up you changing your grip and will be very, very prepared for your serve.

    Also, don't try to hit the ball as much, focus on the brushing. Your power comes from your legs, trunk, and wrist on serves, so don't think you have to hit it squarely to generate your pace. Just gradually rotate over, over a day of practice. Also I suggest hitting about 150-200 serves a day to keep your form together. Be careful about over practicing though (pff, my school coaches always yell at me cus i stay after the school "practices" and hit about 3 shopping carts of serves a day lol). Don't expect yourself to hit with the eastern grip right away, when i was learning it, it took me about a week to be able to get in in, much less hard, but now i can consistantly hit kicks that hit the fence above the middle pole. Gradual is best, gentlemen.
     
    #8
  9. James Brown

    James Brown Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    478
    i found that i can hit with a backhand grip provided i arch my back a lot more. its not that tough to get used to, i never hit a kick serve properly til a couple of days ago, hit some nasty ones too. its amazing what acceleration will do...lol
     
    #9
  10. bcaz

    bcaz Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    986
    After you've hit a lot of serves with backhand grips, they will feel more natural, especially if you hit up on the ball. All sorts of pros serve with a variety of grips and add variety to their deliveries with less alteration to their toss. Watching Haas lately, by the way, I noted how he seemed to hit all his first and second serves with a rather extreme backhand grip. In fact, all his grips seem to be very biased to the strong end of the spectrum.
     
    #10
  11. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    And the winner is BCAZ!!! Bingo, that is all it is. Hitting more serves in the grip. Practice!
     
    #11

Share This Page