Klippermate stringers for beginner?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by Mark55, Jun 17, 2004.

  1. Mark55

    Mark55 Guest

    #1
  2. David Pavlich

    David Pavlich Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    1,203
    It's the machine on which I started. It will do a good job as long as you do your part. It's time consuming, but if you're only stringing a few racquets, it'll be fine.

    David
     
    #2
  3. Simbah2004

    Simbah2004 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    383
    David, isn't the Klippermate difficult to learn and eventually master? I read somewhere this machine (apart from the low price) was not suitable for beginners.
     
    #3
  4. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,240
    The ATS SS II and similar machines with a ratcheting tension head are easier to use, IMO. The clutch eliminates the need to fiddle with the amount of slack you leave in the string so the tension arm can reach the horizontal position.
     
    #4
  5. Mark55

    Mark55 Guest

    Well I have a lot of people who could teach me how to string very quickly so it wont take me long to figure out any stringer really, but what stringer would be the best for stringing 5 or so peoples racquets including myself and I break strings every 5 sets or about 3 or 4 days thats under 300$.
     
    #5
  6. Simbah2004

    Simbah2004 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    383
    I think for that price range you can get a better machine than the Klippermate (6 point mounting system and flying clamps).
     
    #6
  7. christian

    christian Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2004
    Messages:
    210
    the klipper has a 2-pt mounting system and I would have to give to mounting edge to the ATS. The silent partner with a 6pt mounting system is what I wish I would have gotten. BUT my SS2 has served me very well and is much easier to string on thana klipper.
     
    #7
  8. David Pavlich

    David Pavlich Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    1,203
    I suppose it could be difficult, but I'm a techy kind of person (been in the maintenance field most of my years) so it didn't take long to figure out.

    One advantage I had was I used a couple of types of string only. It made it much easier to anticipate the amount of slack I needed to get the tension arm correct. Trying to string a variety of strings on a Klipper could get quite tedious.

    As others have posted, the ratcheting system is better because it virtually eliminates the slack question. It all comes down to how much you want to spend and how much time you want to spend stringing.

    No matter what stringer you buy, whether it's a Klipper, a Gamma 602, a Silent Partner Aria (yea!) or a Babolat Sensor, there will be some sort of compromise when comparing one to another, within the parameters in which you are looking.

    David
     
    #8
  9. Simbah2004

    Simbah2004 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    383
    David, thanks for the input. After many postponed decisions, I decided to spend $200 more and get the Eco with fixed clamps. I already have many tennis buddies asking me to string their racquets, especially on weekends! How can I say no to extra weekend income? :)
     
    #9
  10. David Pavlich

    David Pavlich Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    1,203
    You've made a good choice. And if you ever decide to sell it, you'll get a better return since it has the fixed clamps.

    David
     
    #10
  11. Simbah2004

    Simbah2004 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    383
    Yes David, and the numbers agree in medium - long term.
     
    #11

Share This Page