Knee issues-- Vastus Lateralis

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by alidisperanza, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. alidisperanza

    alidisperanza Hall of Fame

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    Hey all,

    I've been noticing discomfort and pain in what I think is my vastus lateralis/ patellar tendon area. The strange part is, it only hurts when resting or inactive. As soon as I step on court, the pain goes away and I'm fine-- same for post playing tennis. What could it be?
     
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  2. jonahnaturals

    jonahnaturals Rookie

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    It might be a tight iliotibial band.

    You can google "test for a tight iliotibial band" or "test for tight IT band."

    You can then google "how to foam roll IT band" or "how to foam roll iliotibial band."

    Hope this helps.
     
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  3. alidisperanza

    alidisperanza Hall of Fame

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    Good tip-- doing some reading on it now and have to find a table high enough so that my feet don't touch the ground for testing!
     
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  4. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Ischemia - pain from lack of blood flow?

    I had a torn rotator cuff and it gave me an ache in my shoulder while in bed. Changing position did not help. However, if I got up and moved around it would go away.

    During my PT treatment, the physical therapist mentioned ischemia as a possible cause. Since moving around stopped the pain I believe that he was correct.

    Search, consider ischemia.

    Recent thread on knee tendon issues. http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=411990

    See a Dr and don't diagnose or treat yourself.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
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  5. alidisperanza

    alidisperanza Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for the link, I'll read it now.

    I'm familiar with ischemic limbs but I don't quite think that's it-- IT band makes more sense although Ober's test proved negative and Noah's test was inconclusive. I don't have pain when extending my leg and applying pressure but feel discomfort when poking and prodding.

    Also, I'm not trying to self-diagnose, only to learn more about what's going on with my leg/knee. I'm not in any major discomfort at the moment and can still freely play. Instead, I just want to learn more about it so that should I continue to develop issues I'll be aware of what's going on, what not to do, and if I should need a doctor.
     
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  6. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    lateral collateral ligament is near your pain area also

    Another possibility is the lateral collateral ligament (LCL).

    The LCL connects the femur to the fibula of the lower leg. Its upper attachment is also near the vastus lateralis & patella tendon that you mention.

    I have not experienced pain from my lateral collateral ligament but have had mild pain from my medial collateral ligament (MCL). My MCL pain was due to a tricky cause. At the gym I did seated hamstring curls on a machine. The side of my knee hurt and I suspected the seated leg curl machine. The machine was the cause but it was not due to the curl exercise. The knee stress occurred when I turned my body to get off the machine - my knee was dragged across a roller and that stressed my MCL. When I lifted my leg with my hand, getting off no longer stressed the MCL and the pain stopped. It did not take very much to make my MCL tender.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
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  7. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    This sounds like a real possibility.

    "Sixftlion" that often posts here is actually Suzanna McGee, author of Tennis Fitness for the Love of It, and runs the Tennis Fitness Training web site. She has a great description of "IT Band Myofascial Release for Knee Pain Relief" at http://www.tennisfitnesslove.com/2010/05/it-band-myofascial-release-for-knee-pain-relief/

    The information here is well written, but perhaps she'll see this post and be able to chime in.


    One of the interesting aspects she emphasizes:
    "Also, it is important to strengthen your legs and hips and develop even balance between your left and right side. Do walking lunges, jumping lunges, crossover lunges and one-leg squats regularly."


    This is in keeping with the following:
    "Recently, health experts have found that runners with a weakened or fatigued gluteus medius muscle in the hip are more likely to end up with ITB syndrome. This muscle controls outward movements of the hip. If the gluteus medius isn't doing its job, the thigh tends to turn inward. This makes the knee angle into a knock-kneed position. The ITB becomes tightened against the bursa on the side of the knee. This is also called a valgus deformity of the knee."
    - http://www.orthogate.org/patient-education/knee/iliotibial-band-syndrome.html

    Thus looking at the image below, with a weak gluteus medius muscle, the ileotibial band would be more "stetched" outward laterally when running.
    [​IMG]
    Assessing and Treating Dysfunction of the Gluteus Medius http://www.mikereinold.com/2008/12/gluteus-medius-evaluation-strengthening.html

    I thought this interesting as "Posture Guy" has many postings cautioning that problems in one area (like iliotibial band syndrome) are often the result of muscle imbalances of the core (like hip/gluteus imbalances).


    So I guess a question for the OP is whether he has an off court conditioning program, and whether it involves doing squats?
     
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  8. alidisperanza

    alidisperanza Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for the post. At 23, I can't say I really have a training regimen anymore :(
     
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  9. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Life really does get complicated and it seems like there just is not time to do any kind of complex workout to stay in shape.

    But even just a little work off court can make a big difference in overuse injuries from tennis cropping up.

    Any chance of a little morning workout that includes body weight squats, lunges and a few of the thrower's ten exercise regimen?
     
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  10. Boricua

    Boricua Hall of Fame

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    I did too much weights and rhe side of my knee began to ache. Seems that part got to stiff and inflamed maybe. Just running now, no weghts for the legs for at least two months. Then, low weight and rest between sessions.

    Still have some pain but less, thanks God. :)
     
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  11. alidisperanza

    alidisperanza Hall of Fame

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    I've been planning on getting back on a light P90x and building in to it for the morning activities but motivation is tough, I seem to be able to find excuses easily/ would rather just go play tennis or basketball for a few hours haha. I'm working on it!
     
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  12. sixftlion

    sixftlion Rookie

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    Didn't see this post until now... but CharlieFedererer is right, even if you do just a little bit, it's better than nothing. Sometimes, when we have too complicated goals, it's hard to motivate ourselves. But if you promise yourself to do 15-20 minute workout immediately after your tennis, on the court or in the grass, it's pretty doable. And guess what, you do it 3-4 times per week and it will make HUGE difference. That's often how I do it. And sometimes when you start, it's easier to continue and maybe you will do 30 or 40 minutes... Get yourself the rubberband (versaloop) and do the monster walk after your tennis practice, it will help your imbalances: http://www.tennisfitnesslove.com/2012/07/monster-walk-for-strong-hips-to-prevent-injuries-and-improve-performance/. You can also do one or two easy sets before your tennis practice, to "wake up" your gluteus medius, in case it's not firing correctly.
     
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