Latest Wilson racquet technology breakthrough?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by Jaeger, Feb 9, 2013.

  1. Jaeger

    Jaeger New User

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    #1
  2. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    #2
  3. The Meat

    The Meat Hall of Fame

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    I need to do this right now with my K-90's :)

    Edit: Tried, but unfortunately the gap is too small. :(
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2013
    #3
  4. o0lunatik

    o0lunatik Rookie

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    cool idea but i wonder if wilson will reinforce the racket's buttcap considering that it's only held together by 4 staples.
     
    #4
  5. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    Shows how stupid patents can be. If this is ever granted, I will eat my hat.

    The same applies for the spin effect technology. There is a thread in this same forum that shows a Snauwaert racquet with 12 mains and 13 crosses. You can't just patent string patterns, that would be crazy. I know Wilson is trying to patent the idea of less crosses than mains, but it is ridiculous IMO.
     
    #5
  6. Greg G

    Greg G Professional

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    Maybe you could tailweight it with bottlecaps :)
     
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  7. PBODY99

    PBODY99 Hall of Fame

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    There is sooo much effort to cover all bases that the true TROLLS, are Patent Trolls
     
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  8. themitchmann

    themitchmann Hall of Fame

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    Monsanto managed to have a soybean patented, so anything is possible.
     
    #8
  9. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    Hey, they're now granting patents on the human genome sequencing, a bit at odds with the old dictum that something found in nature couldn't be patented. (This latter fact was the reason lithium carbonate wasn't marketed for bipolar disorder in the US until about 1970 despite being shown effective in 1949 -- no company wanted to sell it because lilthium carbonate is found in nature, so the company couldn't have exclusivity.)
     
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