Lob Queens

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by SuperLotto, Jul 10, 2010.

  1. SuperLotto

    SuperLotto New User

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    Can someone tell me what the the best strategy is against lob queens (doubles)? I can lob back, but the points go on forever.
     
    #1
  2. Austinthecity

    Austinthecity Rookie

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    Try playing a little further back from the net than usual (perhaps barely in front of the service line) and take them as overheads.

    People stop lobbing after 2-3 good overheads.
     
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  3. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    I'd overhead like crazy, unless it's the kind of lob that bounces around the baseline and over your head.
     
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  4. xFullCourtTenniSx

    xFullCourtTenniSx Hall of Fame

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    You can try and slice it back low or drive it back deep but with moderate pace.
     
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  5. GetBetterer

    GetBetterer Hall of Fame

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    I would smash that thing, but assuming you can't, hit some topspin shots that still stay relatively close to the net and go back into the court, except don't make them lobs.

    Do they lob because you're at net, or do they just do it...for the sake of doing it?

    Play aggressive, get at the net and smash that thing, do a drive volley!
     
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  6. Jaewonnie

    Jaewonnie Professional

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    This is the time when you practice Federer US Open 09 "through the legs" passing shot.

    :D
     
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  7. thebuffman

    thebuffman Professional

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    unfortunately superlotto lobqueens are the dominators of 3.5 and below doubles leagues. the reason is because at this level, most players have never practiced hitting the overhead smash. lobs are a last resort defensive shot primarily for high levels of play because unless it is well placed, the lob is going to get returned with incredible pace down and into the court. at the lower levels of play though, the lob is used to mix things up or is very well used as a regular rally ball.

    my suggestion is begin practicing overhead smashes until you become comfortable with the shot. after you do that, you will own lob queens. i am speaking from experience mind you as i also play 3.5 level. i practiced my overhead and now i am very comfortable with smashing and i typically make the lob kings pay when they try that soft mess on me.

    oh and consider this. there are different variations of smashing. if you want to go for a safer smash, consider hitting it as you would a slice serve especially if you are not comfortable laying into the smash. also don't make the mistake of trying to kill it. trust me on this. if you master a very smooth smash with nice pronation into the ball, it will be a harder/faster shot than most forehands. even if they get it back, typically it sets you up for another smash but this time it is usually closer to the net, and thats when i CRUSH it, bouncing it over the fence LOL!
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2010
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  8. Blake0

    Blake0 Hall of Fame

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    Net person should move back a little closer to the service line as mentioned to cover more lobs except the really good ones.

    If they're hitting topspin lobs, you've gotta hit more slices and keep the ball low so its harder for them to lob well.

    If they're hitting plain lobs, mix it up. Anything out of the opponents comfort zone makes it harder to execute lobs consistently well. You can increase the pace, add more spin, and make them hit lobs from different areas of the court. Hitting short slices/dropshots is effective too.

    The server should be mixing up serves if they lob returns a lot. It's hard to lob a kick serve, and flat serves with good pace on them. Slice serves are easier to lob unless you can really get the slice spin on the serve. Its good to mix up your serve though, and go more toward the body and backhand side, most people usually have less control there.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2010
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  9. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    I face a lot of lob queens. And at times I morph into a lob queen myself. Usually when I'm losing. My partners and I have turned around entire matches -- even at 4.0 -- by lobbing our heads off.

    The trouble with the standard advice (hit your overhead, hit slice) is that if either you or your partner can't execute these shots, you are in trouble.

    Another tactic that has worked for me is two back. They lob. You lob it back. When your lob bounces and your opponents are distracted trying to lob it back, you launch a sneak attack. You go to the service line, in front of the player who is about to hit the ball.

    And you intercept it. If you can overhead it, great. If not, just hit a volley angle off of it. Any pathetic volley will work so long as it isn't deep, because lob queens can't run down anything that doesn't come right into their wheelhouse at the baseline. And your short, angled volley will be difficult for them to hit a lob off of because they have less room to work with and they aren't so great at moving forward anyway.

    In the last match where my partner and I used this tactic, our volleys were well and truly embarrassing. Horrific dribblers off of our racket, nasty volleys that bounced high into the air. Didn't matter. There was so much confusion on the other side of the net that we won point after point by volleying short.

    Good luck. I hate lob tennis. It must be stopped. Except when I do it.
     
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  10. halalula1234

    halalula1234 Professional

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    i would hit a hard top spin shot at them and try to come in.
     
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  11. mlktennis

    mlktennis Semi-Pro

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    it is a rite of passage to get past the lobbers just like the pushers. It shows what you need to work on in your game. patience,
    postioning,
    slice,
    counter lobs,
    Solid angle volleys,
    overheads, and
    drive volleys.

    This is the order of stuff I have worked on to beat up on the lobbers...still don't have the drive volley down yet :(

    Patience for me is key! They usually can't hurt you so just choose your moment.
     
    #11
  12. mlktennis

    mlktennis Semi-Pro

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    That's what they want. Unless you can blow them off the court consistently (hard b/c they are camped out deep on the baseline) , you will make more errors or get lobbed again and back you go-getting tired and fustrated. If you had a good overhead, then there would be no discussion anyway-
     
    #12
  13. esgee48

    esgee48 Hall of Fame

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    No one has mentioned hitting angled ground strokes short into the court. If they're camped on the baseline and do not come in, these shots will force them to come in to cut off the angles. If they don't come in, then these shots are winners. Then there's also drop shots and angled volleys as suggested by CindySphinx. IMO, it's a rite of passage. No one lobs if they can help it at 4.0+ because the ball is just put away.
     
    #13
  14. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    When teaching 3.0 and 3.5 women, I emphasize moving for the overheads. Getting back to the proper place quickly is the key, so you have time to set up for the overhead. Start moving back FAST as soon as you see a lob coming - if you go too far, it is easy to move forward. Then, since you are set up well for the overhead, it is not a difficult shot and you should be able to put it away. Unless you make them pay for lobbing, there is no reason for them to quit doing it.
     
    #14
  15. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    One problem some of my partners have (and I sometimes have!) is that it can be difficult to put away an overhead against two lobbers at the baseline. If you try to generate enough pace to blow it by them, you miss. And if you are steady and consistent with your overhead, that's not good enough. This is no surprise considering the slow serve speed at 3.0/3.5. If these ladies cannot hit their own serve hard, how are they going to hit an overhead hard when they don't control the toss and have to move to set up?

    That's why I think that it is important to improve your overhead, but it is equally important to learn to handle these balls with your volley and with short groundstrokes.
     
    #15
  16. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    Practice, practice, practice.
    You've got to become a better player than them to win.
     
    #16
  17. mlktennis

    mlktennis Semi-Pro

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    True,

    I was getting a sound beatdown from a 4.0+ player. Hit harder, more consistent, faster etc. Nothing was working and Eventually resorted to moon balling and lobs...lost even quicker. What works great at 3.5 is death at 4.0
     
    #17
  18. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    Are both your opponents staying back and lobbing or is the deep person lobbing deep to give their net partner time to poach a groundstroke reply (since it has to cover a lot of ground just to get back to the net)?...or testing to see if your lob reply is too short in which case, again, the net person can intercept and overhead smash? I am assuming this is doubles?
     
    #18

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