Look what Stefan Edberg has been up to...

Discussion in 'General Pro Player Discussion' started by Russell Finch, Jun 7, 2004.

  1. Russell Finch

    Russell Finch Rookie

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    #1
  2. dax_q

    dax_q Rookie

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    He only won that because of the 21-1 tennis score.
     
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  3. irishbanger

    irishbanger Rookie

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    That, and hanging close in table tennis (known affectionately as ping pong).
     
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  4. Max G.

    Max G. Hall of Fame

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    Well, that would be his strategy then. Dominate the tennis, and hang close in the other sports. That's fair game.
     
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  5. Datacipher

    Datacipher Banned

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    Yep, fair game. That's their rules. You can't blame him for being particularly good at tennis! Sounds like his only big weakness is badminton, and you have to think if he keeps playing he'll get a lot better....
     
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  6. @wright

    @wright Hall of Fame

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    Do they play 2 sports on the same day? Or I guess what I'm asking is in what period of time do they play the 4 sports?
     
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  7. Max G.

    Max G. Hall of Fame

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    Actually, I think there would be many players whose strategies would revolve around dominating one sport and hanging close in the rest.

    After all, who would get into this on a high level in the first place - probably there would be plenty of guys that played one of those sports at a pro level, and then after retiring switched to racketlon.

    And the rules, which specifically state that "Each rally must count" definitely encourage such a strategy.
     
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  8. galain

    galain Hall of Fame

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    Racketlon sounds like it would be a lot of fun. Has anyone ever walked off a squash court and onto a tennis court? You just have to laugh!
     
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  9. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    I am sure most posters on these boards play all 4 of these racquet sports. Along with racquetball and handball.
     
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  10. Max G.

    Max G. Hall of Fame

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    Not really. A significant portion of the posters here are young.

    I, being just 17, have never played squash; my experience with Badminton has been limited, I've never played it beyond batting a birdie around with my parents. Nothing like competitive badminton.

    I've only actually played tennis and pingpong.
     
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  11. @wright

    @wright Hall of Fame

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    I don't think you necessarily play all of these sports as you age. It depends on where you are. I'm older than Max G. and have only played ping pong, tennis, and a little badmitton with my dad years ago. I've been to workout facilities with squash courts, but no one was ever using the courts.
     
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  12. Kevin T

    Kevin T Professional

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    I play squash (and probably play it better) more than tennis these days and can say it has improved my fitness more than tennis,running or any other activity. Actually, I think my fitness is better now, playing squash 3-4 times per week, than when I played football in college. From what I read on internet squash sites, Edberg is approaching "open" level in squash. Not surprising, considering his superb footwork and volleying skills. I have gone from squash to racquetball and tennis in the same day and the larger ball and heavier racquet feels like you're swinging a baseball bat. Alan, I learned that squash is almost non-existant in the south, with the exception of a few larger cities. It's very popular in Chucktown, SC, probably more so than racquetball and theh southeastern championships are held in the ATL, where it's easy to find a court/game. Other than those cities, unless you live near a major university, good luck. Moving from Cincinnati to SC meant going from dozens and dozens of squash courts to 2.
     
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  13. @wright

    @wright Hall of Fame

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    Yeah Kevin, it's strange, I was a member at a large workout facility that had 3 racquetball courts that were frequently used, as well as 2 squash courts which were NEVER used. I never saw anyone play squash even once. Funny that they would bother putting a couple squash courts in there even though the building was more likely to be washed away in a flood than have someone play squash.
     
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  14. AndyC

    AndyC Semi-Pro

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    I think u'd have a lot more exposure of all these sports in certain countries in europe but especially scandinavia/britain.. I wouldn't be surprised it these racketlon tournaments originated in scandinavia.
     
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  15. galain

    galain Hall of Fame

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    Yes, Andy has it right. In countries where the weather prevents a lot of year round outdoor sports, indoor sports really seem to take on a life of their own. Most of the badminton I've played has been in Germany during the winter, and in Singapore during the monsoon season.

    Surprisingly enough, squash is an extremely popular game down here in Oz, but because we're mostly lucky enough to play sports outside year round, the squash courts for the most part are not in especially good shape. Most squash is played at little suburban clubs.

    What's the difference between a racquetball court and a squash court? Racquetball doesn't seem to be played much here, but when it is, it's played on a squash court.
     
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  16. Kevin T

    Kevin T Professional

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    I believe Andy is correct. From recollection, it started in Sweden. Galain, an international squash court is about 21' wide by 32' long, while a racquetball court is 20' x 40'. Many squash courts in North America are converted racquetball courts, measuring 18 1/2' x 32' or so. I play both and there is no comparison; squash is the better workout. However, racquetball is harder on my body, especially the back, due to the diving and torqueing on drive serves and forehand set-ups. And by the way, the Aussies have had the best squash teams lately (David Palmer a former #1, Stuart Boswell, Paul Price, John White a former #1 -before he switched his allegiance to Scotland), though England will likely be better for the near future. Good time to be English, what with their cricket, squash, rugby and soccer (sorry...uhm...football) successes lately.
     
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  17. redpurusha

    redpurusha Rookie

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    Edberg squashes the competition. I couldn't stop myself from writing this (although korny).
     
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  18. rayjordan

    rayjordan Guest

    Racketlon!

    Hi guys - you were right whoever thought racketlon originated in Sweden, spot on - I play, check out the website www.racketlon.com

    get involved!!
     
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