Looking again at Laver's 1969 - Exploding the Grass/Clay only Myth

Discussion in 'Former Pro Player Talk' started by timnz, May 6, 2012.

  1. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    By the way, Drakulie, I'm all for talking about the variety of surfaces today (eg, Deco and Rebound Ace) and the variety of surfaces back then. If someone doesn't want to talk about these things because the surfaces have changed too much and such comparisons are unfair to certain players, fine, but that cuts in both directions.
     
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  2. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    I think you forget that I am not the one holding Laver to todays standards, nor holding todays players to Lavers standards.

    People like you are the ones to quickly point out that no player since laver has won the calendar slam, and yada, yada, yada to talk about his greatness, and put everyone else down as if players today could even attempt to win 3 majors on grass and one on clay in one given year.
     
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  3. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    What are you talking about? Laver couldn't play the 4 majors that exist today between 1963-1967, because they were only open to amateur players. Also, he didn't play at the 1970 Australian Open because of politics (NTL dispute with authorities), the 1970 French Open (WCT dispute with authorities), 1971 US Open (increasing hostility between the ILTF and the WCT), the 1972 French Open and 1972 Wimbledon (WCT players banned by the ILTF), and 1973 Wimbledon had the 81 player boycott over the ILTF banning Nikola Pilic.

    Despite all this, Laver could still do the CYGS in the amateurs, professionals and in the open era.
     
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  4. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    ^^^^ Yawn.

    I suppose he was the ONLY player during all that time you cite that was effected. Did tennis even exist back then, or was it a simple case of everyone outcasting him so he couldn't play? :roll:
     
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  5. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    I said that the professional players were banned from the 4 majors, as we know them today, before the open era started in April 1968, so no, it didn't just affect Laver. The point is, the criteria was different back then.

    The best players back then didn't win Wimbledon 5 years in a row, because they would have turned professional long before that. Roy Emerson was the only player after the Second World War to dominate in the amateurs and resist turning professional for years on end. The other great players from the 1930s onwards all turned professional, players like Tilden, Nusslein, Vines, Perry, Budge, Riggs, Kramer, Gonzales, Sedgman, Trabert, Rosewall, Hoad, Anderson, Cooper, Olmedo and Laver, all turned professional before long. In Nusslein's case, he barely played any amateur tennis at all.

    None of these great players ever had the opportunity to do things like win 5 Wimbledons in a row. Gonzales only once played at Wimbledon as an amateur (1949), and didn't set foot there again until the Wimbledon Pro tournament of 1967, when he was 39. Kramer played Wimbledon just twice, reaching the R16 in 1946 and winning the tournament in 1947. 1947 was the last time Kramer played at Wimbledon because he turned professional later that year, and the open era was more than 20 years away.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2012
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  6. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Obviously you don't hold today's player to Laver's standards, because those standards including winning tournaments on wood, and facing the challenges of 3 grasscourt venues that played differently. And of course Federer can't do those things. There's no chance, no opportunity, for him to do it.

    But you've always emphasized that the players of Laver's time did not have a hardcourt major -- even though there was no chance, no opportunity, for them to face that challenge.

    And you've always emphasized how today's players not only have a hardcourt major, they've got radically different kinds of hardcourts that they've had to master. Deco, RA, Plexicushion. You give the players today credit for these things, and point out continually that Laver's time did not have even one hardcourt major.

    All right, everyone. Gather around. Hush. If you listen closely, you can hear the sound of someone holding yesterday's players to the hardcourt standards of today, and judging yesterday's standard to be inferior.

     
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  7. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    ^^You have a serious comrehension problem and are taking my posts out of context. Go back, read, and try and follow the course of the conversation.
     
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  8. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Listen, if you're really serious that you don't hold any players to the standards of another generation, then you won't fault Laver's generation for not having to win a hardcourt major, just as you won't fault Federer for not having won any titles on wood. But every statement I've ever seen you make in this forum, about surfaces, has been about how the surface variety of the Slams, back then, is inferior to what exists today -- and the reason you always give is that THEY did not have something that WE have TODAY (ie, a hardcourt major).

    If that is not holding yesterday's generation to the standards of today, then nothing is.
     
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  9. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    I don't, or do you not know how to comprehend what you read?
     
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  10. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    ok, fair enough.
     
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  11. TMF

    TMF Talk Tennis Guru

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    You can't hold Federer and Laver to the standard of another era because the conditions/situations weren't available. But there are some truth that you have to take into consideration. Fed doesn't get to play in a split fields, and he had to compete in a bigger pool. So if you want to compare title per title between Fed's era and Laver's era, Fed should have more weight. If you insist on they all have equal weight(e.g. Emerson 12 slams is equal to today's 12 slams), you are selling today's players short.

    Wouldn't that be like saying the best soccer player in the English Premier League(EPL) can't consider be the better player than the best player in the USA Soccer League? With the EPL being a much bigger pool(and more countries) than the league in the USA, one has to consider(objectively) the player in EPL is a better player.
     
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  12. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    Emerson won all his majors as an amateur when the world's best players were professionals. With Laver, who was the best player in the world from 1964 up to 1970, it is totally different.
     
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  13. adidasman

    adidasman Professional

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    Forget which tournaments were played on which surface. Doesn't the fact that Laver played on crazy stuff like wood just mean his overall year would have been tougher for him to contend with? Didn't that mean he had more adjustments to make, more abrupt shifts between surfaces that would have messed with his game and his consistency? It's not just about the majors he won - it's about what he had to do in between those majors. Laver didn't have the luxury of picking and choosing his tournaments the way a guy like Federer does; he still had to pay the bills, so he had to play pretty much everything he was physically able to play. If you don't think that gives a decided edge to Laver in terms of his accomplishments, you're daft. ;)
     
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  14. hoodjem

    hoodjem G.O.A.T.

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    I have a comrehension problem also. (But then again, I don't even know what is "comrehension.")
     
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  15. hoodjem

    hoodjem G.O.A.T.

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    I might agree.

    Do you mean that players today will be never able to duplicate the particular surfaces (of Laver's GS: 3 on grass and 1 on clay), or that they will not be able to win a Grand Slam today at all?
     
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  16. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    That's a nice point, and easy to forget with all the focus on majors and the constant debates about the Grand Slam.

    If you look at Federer's 2011 tournaments, he played different surfaces, but in solid uninterrupted blocks. He played all hardcourt tournaments through March, followed by a stretch of clay that ended at Wimbledon. From there all his remaining tournaments were hardcourt. He made the switched from outdoor to indoor tournaments once in the season (his last 3 tournaments were indoors).

    That's not to say that he faced no changes in that time period. He went through different kinds of hardcourt (but that's true of Laver too). And he switched from outdoor to indoor (but that was certaintly true of Laver).

    Laver's schedule in '69, I don't have the details of. But I doubt he got to play the different surfaces in uninterrupted blocks -- if only because it was such chaos at the start of the Open Era!
     
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  17. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    Laver´s competition was 3 times tougher than Federer talking about the big boys, which are the ones that are able to win the majors.Nº 47 or nº 76 will never win a single major, they don´t count at all.Just top 10-15-20.
     
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  18. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    Just Laver haters ( Fed fans basically) don´t know that.Thanks for posting it.
     
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  19. hoodjem

    hoodjem G.O.A.T.

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    Based on what he's stated, I believe that Laver is a Fed fan. Also, it appears that Fed has profound respect for Laver.

    One can be a fan of both, as I am.
     
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  20. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    Of course you can enjoy the styles of both players. I like to enjoy the different playing styles of different players. Nadal and Federer have very different ways of play but I enjoy watching them both in action. Laver and Federer have very different styles but I enjoy both.

    Sometimes I do think some believe it's impossible to like more than one player or perhaps just a few.
     
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  21. TMF

    TMF Talk Tennis Guru

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    LOL at kiki. As usual, he's goofing around by saying the opposite.
     
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  22. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    actually, it is very easy to be right on this forum...just saying the opposite to you and that´s it...
     
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  23. TMF

    TMF Talk Tennis Guru

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    You are wrong in so many occasions, especially this one. NSK goof off quite often too in the General Player Forum.
     
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  24. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    Pietrangeli,Santana,Hoad,Gonzales,Emmo,Fraser,Stolle,Rosewall,Newcombe,Roche,Kodes,Nasty,Smith,Gimeno,Ashe plus Okker,Taylor,Drysdale,Richey,Lutz,Kodes,Franulovic,Pilic,Ralston,Cox,Fillol,young Orantes,Froehling,Graebner...ALL OF THEM TRYING TO STOP LAVER´S RUN AT THE GRS...If Federer,Nadal or anybody else just sat down and looked up at a draw and saw ALL THOSE NMAES PUT TOGETHER, they´d probably faint right on the spot.No matter which size the draws ( rest are mere journeymen)....this is the final proof of Laver greatness.The toughest field ever and HE STILL WINS THE BIG 4 TH¡¡¡¡¡ IN A ROW¡¡¡¡¡
     
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  25. timnz

    timnz Hall of Fame

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    Still trying to establish the number 1 Hard Court event of 1969

    In another thread when discussing the top events of 1969 - the Pacific Southwest (won by Pancho Gonzales that year) was rated over the South African Open. Hence, is the Pacific Southwest the number 1 1969 Hard Court event?
     
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  26. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    Pietrangeli,Santana,Hoad,Gonzales,Emmo,Fraser,Stol le,Rosewall,Newcombe,Roche,Kodes,Nasty,Smith,Gimen o,Ashe plus Okker,Taylor,Drysdale,Richey,Lutz,Kodes,Franulovic ,Pilic,Ralston,

    Not even a Hollywood top producer could have dreamt of such a field as the backstage for the greatest feat in tennis history, the very same year of the greatest feat in human history.
     
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  27. urban

    urban Hall of Fame

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    Its difficult to rank events in a specific order, say Super Nine events. You have to consider draws, format, tradition, prize money, importance for world ranking, press coverage, reception in year books among other things. In the early open era it changes from year to year. In Tennis World, the yearbook for 1969 edited by John Barrett, the South African Champs was ranked the 5th most important event of the year. It got a special report alongside the 4 majors plus the German and Italian Champs. In the Enzyclopedia Britannica yearbook for 1969, is was also ranked the 5th most important event in an article by Lance Tingay. The SA Open had a broad and good field (96), had best of 5 all the way.
    The LA had a 64 field, best of 3. In 1968 the LA event had special importance, because it was one of the only 8 open tournaments. As the last of those open events it had special meaning for the World ranking of 1968. In 1970, it also was important for the top ranking. In 1971 it went down in importance, because it was skipped by the WCT players. Berkeley for instance had the much better field in 1971, with all the WCT top players plus Stan Smith and i think Nastase.
     
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