Looking for Help Choosing a Camera

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Torut, Dec 6, 2011.

  1. Torut

    Torut New User

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    I am currently in the process of looking for a decent camera to video entire matches. I have looked and looked but am just overwhelmed by the all the different specs on the cameras. So I am looking for reccomendations of what you may have that works already. Price is a big concern and I don't need professional level quality. I would like something that can be compatable with Dartfish if I ever decide to break down and use it. However at this time I just want something I can plug up to my big screen or computer monitor and analyze match footage. Looking to keep the price under $400. Any recomendations would help especially experiences with a given camera. Thanks in advance.
     
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  2. MarinaHighTennis

    MarinaHighTennis Professional

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    Flip Ultra HD with gorillapod
     
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  3. Torres

    Torres Banned

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    Last edited: Dec 6, 2011
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  4. toly

    toly Hall of Fame

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    This is really nice camera.:)
    What software do you use to edit Casio FH-100 videos?:confused:
     
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  5. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    I have a Casio high speed camera (the EX-FH20) and think it is great for sports. However, it might not be the best bang for the buck if you're just looking to tape an entire match.

    My concern is that it will only tape a long match if shot on low quality video. If you shoot HD, it will fill the card quickly. If you shoot slow-motion, it will really fill the card quickly.

    For shooting a whole match, you probably want pretty low quality video or else you're going to fill a lot of hard drives.
     
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  6. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    That confirms what I've read. I think the FH100 caps video files at 4GB each, which for an HD video is about 18 minutes of playing time. You'd need a pretty big SD card to tape an entire match in HD and it would require multiple video files.
     
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  7. kevten

    kevten New User

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    The early Casio Exilim HS models with slow motion video (FC100, FC150, FH100) do not appear to be manufactured any longer. The new models look to be the ZR100 and soon-to-be-released ZR150. They changed some of the frame rates / image sizes. One comment I read is that they do not allow manual shutter speed selection for slow motion video as was done on the FH100, so there is motion blur.
     
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  8. maxpotapov

    maxpotapov Hall of Fame

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    Canon SX230 HS and SX40 HS do 120 fps @ 640x480 and 240 fps @ 320x240
    Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 does 220 fps @ 320x240
    FujiFilm FinePix HS10 (HS11) does 240 fps @ 448x336, 420 fps @ 224x168, 1000 fps @ 224x64
    Nikon Coolpix P300 does 120 fps @ 640x480
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2011
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  9. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    High Speed Video for Xmas

    The Casio FH100 does a great job for stroke analysis. It has MANUAL shutter speed control down to 1/40,000 sec shutter speed to minimize motion blur (= see the ball on the racket strings). I am not certain but I believe there are currently no other affordable high speed video cameras being offered with MANUAL exposure control, they are all AUTO exposure. Motion blur is is not minimized by cameras with AUTO exposure control.

    The FH100 also has small Jello Effect distortions based on some Jello Effect tests that I have done. See Jello Effect videos - http://vimeo.com/user6237669/videos

    For the above HSV cameras the Jello Effect should be measured if accurate videos are needed for stroke analysis. Also, the recording time for high speed video needs to be determined as some HSV cameras only record for a few seconds.

    Unfortunately, I believe that the Casio FH100 is no longer manufactured so you may have to search for a new one still in stock or buy a used one.

    The FH100 will only record to a maximum video file size of 4 Gb (17+ minutes for HD). To record longer, for example, on a 32 Gb SD card, the camera must be retriggered. For 240 fps with corresponding low resolution the FH100 will record almost 11 minutes.

    To record an entire match in HD there are other cameras that will do better than the Casio FH100 but for stroke analysis the FH100 is exceptional. The Casio F1(2008), FH20 and FH25 also have MANUAL exposure control for HSV.

    Toly asked about analysis software. Kinovea is free, open source analysis software that allows comparison of videos side-by-side as often seen in golf swing comparisons.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2011
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  10. maxpotapov

    maxpotapov Hall of Fame

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    + Canon PowerShot S100 does 120 fps @ 640x480 and 240 fps @ 320x240
    www.dpreview.com/reviews/canons100/page7.asp
    And yes, no manual control here
     
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  11. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Those frame rates are very good for stroke analysis. Do you have that camera? For how long can it record once triggered?
     
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  12. sabala

    sabala Semi-Pro

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    Can you shoot 120 fps in wide screen with that camera? I found these vids showing slo mo in a wide format compared to 4:3 ratio in other vids from the FH100....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9UJZssFSZzM&feature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwtI5Eiomik&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

    ...or was it maybe cropped into a wider format in another program before being put on YT?


    I'm starting to think maybe a hi speed cam like the FH100 for stroke analysis AND a camcorder for taping match play is the best way to go....
     
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  13. Chyeaah

    Chyeaah Professional

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    Well, i think Windows Movie Maker can slow mo and stuff, idk.

    If you only need to Slow Mo then just get a freeware program. If you want to do some editing and cutting, the easiest i would say is Premiere Pro but thats expensive, so you should go looking into Sony Vegas.
     
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  14. Lsmkenpo

    Lsmkenpo Hall of Fame

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    I took this high speed video of Ernests Gulbis hitting, using a $100 Casio Exilim EX-FC100. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zlebgMBe7DQ

    For stroke analysis it is hard to beat for the price, you have to have high speed, standard 30fps is useless for stroke analysis.

    kinovea is a great open source motion analysis program that rivals dartfish for free. http://www.kinovea.org/en/ I have dartfish but actually prefer kinovea.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2011
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  15. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    1st Video - That 120 fps mode does look good but the resolution spec for 120 is 640X480. I don't use 120 often and don't know the details but I'm sure the FH100 cannot do HD at 120 fps. The FH100 also has a special recording mode to produce files for the Youtube format. I have not used it. It looks from the signs as if the video is a Casio promotion.

    The 2nd video uses the '30 - 240 fps' mode. The camera takes video at 30 fps and when you trigger it a second time it changes mode to 240 fps, back and forth between 30 & 240 with sound recorded for 30. A very good mode if someone is taping a match and wants to do stroke analysis on some strokes.

    [Note: Youtube uses compression and the quality of stop action frame-by-frame is considerably degraded. Viewing the Casio FH100 video file on the camera's LCD screen or on the computer, using Quicktime, frame-by-frame works smoothly forward & backward.

    You're right about the two-camera approach having big advantages. I have an Aiptek 60p fps and can do a nice job on the overall match and the 60p is also very useful for looking at some stroke features. But the 240 fps with the Casio does a great job for stroke analysis.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2011
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  16. toly

    toly Hall of Fame

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    There are some data from manual of EX-FH100 about quality and recording time of the video.
    [​IMG]

    Thank you tt fellows for information on software for video editing.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
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  17. dizzlmcwizzl

    dizzlmcwizzl Hall of Fame

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    I am not a video-file and cannot give you all the specs but I recently received the Kodak PLaySport and I am happy with it ...

    I have recorded 120 minutes at 720P / 60HZ frame rate. I am able to use media player to get 1/2 speed slow motion which I find good enough. It does not have the capacity to use higher frame rates but the price is good and the picture quality is quite nice.

    All totaled it cost less than $150 including a 16 GB card (which will record 2.5 hours) and a fish eye attachable lens. I am able to set up the camera on top of the net and record the entire baseline. Here is a short video I produced for another thread.
     
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  18. Zolar

    Zolar New User

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    Here's my two cents. I've been using a simple VADO pocket camera and a "QM-1" camera mount (MyTennisTools.com) for a while now and it does all I need it to do. Watching your strokes and footwork during a match is priceless. I've also used side by side analysis with a 30 fps camera (the VADO again) and it works fine for me. Total price for camera mount and camera - about $130 plus or minus.
     
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  19. martini1

    martini1 Hall of Fame

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    Beware of the Lo res on these high frame rates. Shots need to be film very close in order to show up nicely. I have a canon and it does 240fps, but even putting the camera on the umpire chair it was kind of burry because of the Lo res.
     
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  20. shanked_it

    shanked_it Rookie

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    I like go pro helmet hero for versatility and viewing angle
     
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  21. sabala

    sabala Semi-Pro

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    Casio is coming out with the ZR200 in April of this year. It will have the manual shutter speed like the FH100. Also 240 fps is a bit improved at 512 x 384. It will be around 380.00

    For camcorders I came across the Sanyo VPC-SH1. It is capable of 240 fps and 600 fps for analysis. Online I see it's around a few hundred bucks.
     
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  22. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Info on the ZR200

    CORRECTION - the ZR200 may not have MANUAL shutter speed control in high speed video - see reply #28.

    The new Casio ZR200 probably does have MANUAL shutter speed control according to this video. Great news!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xpi75AJIHzE

    I am a little uncertain when interpreting the Casio spec sheet regarding shutter speed and camera operation modes, stills & video, etc. Click ZR200 & FH100 and “compare” on the Casio site below. Look at the "Shutter Type" spec.

    http://www.casio-intl.com/dc/compare/spec/result/

    I believe that the fastest shutter speed for the ZR200 is 1/2000 sec. It should do a very good job showing most of a tennis stroke but there will be some motion blur especially for the highest tennis stroke velocities.

    [Motion blur = object velocity X shutter speed. (for an object going across the frame)]

    For the FH100 the fastest shutter speed is 1/40,000sec and therefore motion blur is negligible for the highest tennis stroke motions (if you have enough light). I use shutter speed 1/10,000s most often.

    BTW. For indoor courts the lighting level is only about 1/100th of the lighting level of direct sunlight outdoors. The FH100 has to use a slow shutter speed ~1/1,000s to collect enough photons for useable video. You can't use fast shutter speeds indoors with current technology and there's motion blur.

    How long can the Sanyo camera record? Please post the link with the info.


    FYI - Some motion blur calculations, reply #614.
    http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/topic...thread/page__st__600__p__3281969#entry3281969
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012
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  23. sabala

    sabala Semi-Pro

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    Sanyo VPC-SH1 recording times listed here -

    http://sanyo.com/xacti/english/products/vpc_sh1/spec.html



    Yeah, too bad about the ZR 200 shutter speed, I found another spec page here listing only 1/2000 shutter speed. Compare to the FH100 spec page here showing up to 1/40,000 shutter speed. Why introduce a great feature then remove it??:confused:

    Also coming out this year at the end of March is the Kodak Playful Zi12. For only 200 bucks it looks to have some great features for both recording matches and doing high speed analysis at 120/240 fps. Don't know what recording times are yet though...
     
    #23
  24. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Sanyo 10 second limit & some features to check on HSV Cameras

    The VPC-SH1 Sanyo camera specs - the last foot note - says

    “The maximum recording time for one video clip in [Web-SHR] and [Web-UHR] modes is approximately 10 seconds (with no sound recording).”

    That is limiting and would not work well, for example, if you wanted to video your own serve and had nobody to operate the camera. (Does it have a remote trigger?) Also, to do stroke analysis from some distance you need a zoom lens, 'point & shoot' camera type optics would be very limiting. That Sanyo does have a very fast video shutter speed of 1/10,000s.

    FYI - I believe that the new Nikon J1 & V1 also have very short maximum recording times, 5 seconds, for their high speed video modes. Please double check that spec.

    The high performance of the Casio FH100 camera must not have resulted in sales as most buyers probably don’t appreciate high speed video performance features beyond frame rate, fps.

    In addition to resolution, frame rate and shutter speed you should check the following high speed video specs and performance characteristics as they may be important for your application:

    1) Maximum recording time after triggering.
    2) Can it be remotely triggered? (My FH100 can't be but my Aiptek 60fps can be.)
    3) How large the LCD screen is and how bright? - especially visibility in sunlight.
    4) How well the camera can do frame-by-frame stop action on the camera? (add See Samsung TL350 (2010) forum comments http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1001&message=36079796 )
    5) Battery life.
    6) Lens - A zoom lens with wide angle to telephoto is best.
    7) Low light sensitivity.
    8 Jello Effect distortions that, under your conditions, may affect the spatial accuracy of high speed video images. This information is difficult to find and never advertized or in spec sheets. I have simulated some of the video set ups and measured the distortions to see if errors are negligible or have to corrected for. Not difficult to do.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
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  25. maxpotapov

    maxpotapov Hall of Fame

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    Nikon 1 System V1 / J1
    640 x 240/400 fps (plays at 30p/29.97 fps)
    320 x 120/1,200 fps (plays at 30p/29.97 fps)

    I just noticed previous post mentioning those, dpreview does not provide details on video recording time in high speed mode, unless I missed smth.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
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  26. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    I believe that those Nikon models only record HSV for a few seconds -~5 sec - but I don't own the camera so I'm not certain. See later replies of this Casio thread and confirm specs with an internet search.

    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1015&message=36835467

    http://www.digitalcamerainfo.com/co...s-J1-Digital-Camera-Review/Video-Features.htm

    “…………..The first mode shoots at 400fps and stretches a roughly five-second clip into a slow motion clip of just over a minute. The second mode shoots at an even higher frame rate, 1200fps, and stretches a five-second clip into a slow-mo clip of three minutes, 20 seconds. Both modes are limited to the five-second recording length, and, remember, both capture very low-quality video.”

    Check that show-stopper spec before buying Nikon V1 or J1 models for tennis stroke analysis. You can often download the complete user's manual from the manufacturer.

    The new Casio ZR200 with manual shutter speed as fast as 1/2,000 s should do a very good job for tennis stroke analysis. CORRECTION - the ZR200 may not have MANUAL shutter speed control in high speed video - see reply #28.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012
    #26
  27. sabala

    sabala Semi-Pro

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    Unfortunately...it appears manual shutter speed is for photo only, not video. :( Check this review out...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwC4sK89d68
     
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  28. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Video saying that the ZR200 does not have manual HSV shutter speed control.

    Thanks a lot for the link. That is too bad.

    I'll have to correct some of my recent replies on the ZR200.
     
    #28
  29. SnoxicTennoxic

    SnoxicTennoxic New User

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    I tried with the GoPro which I normally use for other things:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=r0Gr3W7CFmU#t=97s

    The angle is too wide for my liking, it's a preference thing. If the lowest part in the image would be half the distance from the baseline to the fence it would be better. Didn't play around much with the settings. Maybe you can set it up in a different spot, I pretty much have to attach to the fence.

    What I did like was the red light which clearly signals when it's recording (compared to the compact camera I use instead).
     
    #29
  30. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    What would you consider a min frame rate for video?
     
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  31. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    For stroke analysis 200 fps or more.

    200 fps or more is a good rate for stroke analysis. The shutter speed should be fast to minimize motion blur so that the racket and ball can be located better.

    60 fps with fast shutter speed can be a very useful compromise to video both the whole match and some stroke mechanics. (60p progressive and not 60i interlaced.)

    At 240 fps, internal shoulder rotation - a very fast motion of the serve that occurs over about 0.03 seconds - takes just 7 frames. With 60fps you do not get enough frames to understand this motion.

    (If you want to calculate the motion between frames and motion blur -
    http://www.kinovea.org/en/forum/viewtopic.php?id=435 Reply #1. Also has information on the Jello Effect.)
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012
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  32. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    very helpful, thanks
     
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  33. pdx_tennisplayer

    pdx_tennisplayer New User

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    I borrowed this HD Tennis Camera, it works pretty good and I'm thinking of buying one for the summer.


    http://hdtenniscamera.com

    It hangs on the fence/curtain and has a wide angle lens to record the full court.

    My teammate has one and it works great.

    John (Portland, OR)
     
    #33
  34. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

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    The camera itself only costs $90. They are charging $155 for the hanging
    device. I think for $245 you would be better off buying a higher quality camera
    instead.

    For simple recordings you can just use your camera phone.
    Here is a recording I did with my iphone.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=wBAhNP7wHiE&list=UUgtz77T-V_JqmS3dI7-EeRw
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2012
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  35. corbind

    corbind Professional

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    Some nice info I his thread. Settling in for more responses...
     
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  36. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    High Speed Video and Cheap, Slow SD Cards - CORRECTION 9/21/2012

    CORRECTION 9/21/2012 - I just recorded some 120 fps & 240 fps videos and after recording normally for many seconds a 2Gb cheaper card seems to skip frames.

    I have read several discussions of the speed requirements for SD cards. To be safe I'd always get exactly what the camera manufacturer recommends.

    I am not that knowledgeable in digital technology but found something interesting for my high speed videos. It involves using cheap, slow 2GB SD cards to take and communicate high speed videos. Maybe these slow cards are OK for high speed video of short video clips.

    If you want to communicate videos at low very cost and simply, for example, of many tennis strokes, I have found the following methods with limitations:

    1) Attach to emails - my internet provider limits the attachments to total about 15 MB per email. It can be cumbersome to find each file and attach them as when I sent a team of tennis players their strokes.

    2) Upload to video host site such as Youtube or Vimeo. However, these sites compress the video files farther for storage and the compression, I believe, interferes with proper stop action frame-by-frame analysis. On site, the best you can do is to press the play-pause button as fast as possible. Free Vimeo has a 500MB limit per week. Vimeo also has a $10?/month 'Pro' service that saves uncompressed files that can be downloaded and viewed in proper stop action.

    3) Upload file to a drop box (any file type). I had used a site for up to 100MB original video file with no compression. You then send email to player who can download the complete file. Not sure of the status of the service now.

    4) Cheap SD Cards. As another method of communicating videos, especially longer ones, I considered buying cheap SD cards as loaners. 2GB card cost about $5 with another $5 for shipping, maybe cheaper if you look. These cards are slow or unspecified. Also bought a cheap card reader as a loaner in necessary.

    5) Others Methods? Any other suggestions for communicating at low cost and not requiring computer knowledge or computer set-up changes from those receiving the video files?

    I tried my Class 2? and 4 cheaper 2 & 4 GB cards for recording high speed video of tennis strokes in a Casio FH100 camera. 240fps requires 50Mb/sec. Despite the slow card speed they have worked perfectly so far. According to most forum discussions on SD card speed requirements, the cards should probably have dropped frames so my recordings did not make sense. See CORRECTION above.

    I started a thread on dpreview and got a very interesting reply that makes sense. It says that for short video clips there is a buffer in the camera that can relax the speed requirement from the card.

    See especially 3rd reply.

    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1018&message=41196068

    If true the video clip length is important and might vary considerably because of the buffer size in different cameras.

    It was also pointed out in the dpreview thread that large, fast SD, 32GB, are now very reasonable in cost. Selected files could then be copied to the small SD cards for individual players. Copying requires an additional step and computer whereas the cheap SD card could just be handed to the player after the practice secession.

    Any guinea pigs for some tennis stroke videos around Baltimore?
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2012
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  37. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Website with a listing of high speed video cameras.

    I have been looking for a website that lists high speed video cameras. This is the best that I have found so far, helpful to find cameras. I am not sure if it lists from all available cameras or only those sponsored in some way by retailers or manufacturers. You can select frame rate, camera type, etc.

    http://snapsort.com/explore/best-compacts/240fps-highspeed-movies-24-months-recent?page=2

    The issue of MANUAL exposure control and AUTO exposure control has been discussed in this thread. MANUAL can produce the minimum motion blur that is desirable for sharp high speed videos of rackets, ball impacts, etc. I believe that only the discontinued Casio F1, FH20, FH25, and FH100 (2010) have been offered with full MANUAL. I don't believe that there are any new affordable HSV cameras are now offered with full MANUAL control, all are AUTO. Still, a $120 camera with AUTO & 240fps could show you a great deal about your tennis strokes.
     
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  38. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    #38
  39. vil

    vil Semi-Pro

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    Hey guys, I just purchased a little Gopro Hero2 and it's absolutely awesome.
    It's small and comes with mounting gadgets. And of course it's all HD. Probably not as sophisticated as some above mentioned cameras but it's worth considering.
     
    #39
  40. vil

    vil Semi-Pro

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    Oh yeah, almost forgot, battery lasts 2.5 hrs nonstop recording and my xd card is 16G 4hrs HD recording. It cost here in Australia $399. I'm really happy with it. I just recorded 3 full sets without stopping. It has a fixed lens but very wide angle . I put it on a bracket on the fence right behind the baseline and it came quite good. I had a wall practice and it came up brilliant.
     
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  41. ATP100

    ATP100 Professional

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    1920x1080 @2.5 hours...special battery????
     
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  42. vil

    vil Semi-Pro

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    Nothing really special about the battery but this new model comes with 1100mAh Lithium Ion rather than 1000mAh. 1920x1080 is the highest screen resolution, which is 1080-30 FPS. I haven't experimented with all resolutions but you also have 1280x720 option, which is 720-60 FPS. That should be great for slow motion. I'll try that next.
    This little thing also takes brilliant still pics. It comes with undewater case up to 60m depth. We went to Japan for skiing recently and our friends recorded video of our trip with this little gopro. If you are interested to see the quality, here is the video.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u7__kLZ6xbs
     
    #42
  43. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Smartphone Cameras, 60 fps p Cameras & High Speed Video Cameras

    FYI

    I just posted a reply with some sample videos from an older model Aiptek ActionHD camcorder. Reply #15.

    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?p=6753102#post6753102

    The thread has some discussions related to the issue of comparing:

    1) Smartphone cameras
    2) 60p video cameras
    3) high-performance, high speed video cameras such as the Casio FH100.

    Some well-framed videos of tennis strokes might be useful for those considering using or buying a video camera for tennis stroke analysis.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2012
    #43
  44. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    #44
  45. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Course on High Speed Video for Sports in the Baltimore Area

    FYI - High Speed Video Course in the Baltimore Area -

    The Community College of Baltimore County in the Continuing Education Non-Credit Courses series is offering a course in high speed video capture with emphasis on sports. It meets Tuesdays in Oct at Cockeysville Middle School.

    http://www.ccbcmd.ed...hotography.html See Art 619

    http://www.ccbcmd.edu/ceed/reg.html
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2012
    #45
  46. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    #46
  47. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Low cost high speed video camera capable of stroke analysis.

    Motion Blur Tests - Canon Powershot ELPH 110 HS / IXUS 125

    General High Speed Video Cameras with Automatic Exposure Control. To video tennis strokes, low priced, high speed video (> 60 fps) cameras are available. The currently available cameras all have automatic exposure control (AEC). The shutter speed selected by the camera's automatic exposure control might not be optimized to minimize motion blur. In other words, you often get motion blur with automatic exposure control cameras. The amount of motion blur from these cameras is not predictable from available information but can be tested.

    Canon Powershot ELPH 110 HS/ IXUS 125 Tests. I purchased a low priced Canon Powershot 110 HS / IXUS 125 camera in order to test it for tennis stroke analysis. It does 240 fps at a reduced resolution of 320 X 240.

    The automatic exposure control selects the shutter speed based on the light received from the scene. The specs list the fastest shutter speed as 1/2000 sec, but it is not known if that shutter speed is reached for high speed video mode. Unfortunately, predicting the shutter speed that this camera's AEC might select is not possible without testing.

    To test for shutter speed/ motion blur in direct sunlight -
    1) Observed the motion blur on a rotating disc.
    2) Observed the motion blur on the tennis ball and racket of a tennis serve.

    I found that a very important setting for minimizing motion blur was the zoom setting on the lens. The widest angle zoom aperture setting has the fastest f#, probably 2.7. The wide angle zoom produces very small motion blur in direct sunlight - see videos below. The telephoto aperture setting is probably f# 5.9 and produces significant motion blur - see videos below. For these videos it might also have been important for the AEC that more skylight was accepted by the wide angle field of view than by the telephoto's field of view.

    To attempt single frame advance on Vimeo press the play-pause control as fast as possible. The video quality after compression on Vimeo is not as good as viewing directly on my computer or on the camera's display.

    Widest angle zoom setting - small motion blur
    https://vimeo.com/74060780
    https://vimeo.com/74060778
    https://vimeo.com/74060705

    Most telephoto zoom setting - considerable motion blur
    https://vimeo.com/74060777
    https://vimeo.com/74060779

    These tests were under direct sunlight to get a fast shutter. With less light the motion blur will increase. See also some other Canon high speed video tests of tennis serves and also a rotating disc test to show Jello Effect distortion and shutter speed.

    This camera cost $119, refurbished, with free shipping on sale from Canon. The one I received was in like new condition. http://shop.usa.cano....ed-refurbished

    The Canon 110 HS camera is capable of showing the fastest parts of the tennis serve with wide angle zoom setting and under favorable lighting conditions. Other Canon Powershot cameras with high speed video might work in the same way. ? Other low cost cameras with high speed video might also produce small motion blur with wide angle lens settings and in direct sunlight. ?
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2013
    #47
  48. Baxter

    Baxter Professional

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    I think it works really well. You can see the pronation perfectly on the lefty's serve.
     
    #48
  49. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    I shot the lefty during a match from some distance back often through the fence, with telephoto. Also, late in the day. You can see all his body movements well but the racket and ball show considerable motion blur.

    I shot the other RH server when I could pick my viewpoint and at 11 AM. I used a wide angle lens so that the shutter speed would be faster. It worked and the ball is pretty sharp. If I had shot the RH more from behind, his arm rotation would have stood out more as well.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2013
    #49
  50. HappyMilk

    HappyMilk Rookie

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    I'm not that knowledgeable about cameras and cam equipment. What would any of the cams suggested above work well hanging from a gate? Is it even safe to hang a camera on the gate?
     
    #50

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