Luxilon Big Banger Original 16 longevity? When will the fun end?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by BruceD, Nov 5, 2012.

  1. BruceD

    BruceD Rookie

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    I have my Babolat Y-105 laced up with the stuff, at 47 lbs. Mains, 45 lbs. crosses. I have heard that the great sap back i can feel, will go "flat" somehow, someday, after repeated flex's. i haven't ever used anything like this and I sure hope my playing 3 times or so a week, won't need a restring anytime soon.
    What are the bigger brains thought on the subject?
     
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  2. COPEY

    COPEY Hall of Fame

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    Not a big brain around here, but if you do just a little research you'll find that the consensus is Lux strings generally die pretty quick...some faster than others. To be fair, the lifespan of poly is fairly short compared to a syn/multi anyway (if you're not a string breaker, that is), but Lux strings are pretty much known for their unique feel, very good performance, and short-lived playability.
     
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  3. dgoran

    dgoran Hall of Fame

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    About 2 hrs in your hitting session. If you hit the ball (not push)
     
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  4. ricki

    ricki Professional

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    for me BBO doesnt die, it last friggin long and then snaps from sawing-in
     
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  5. JT_2eighty

    JT_2eighty Hall of Fame

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    While it's true that Luxilon string are not known for good tension longevity, I've noticed that it's the ALU offerings that are really the worst. Those are one-match wonders. Great fresh, then blah the next time out.

    BBO plays well for a lot longer timeframe than ALU. It may have something to do with the thicker gauge, as thicker strings tend to have better stability over time. I could get 3x the playability out of BBO than I did with ALU (3 matches instead of just 1, before I noticed that 'fresh zing' going away). Even then, BBO was still playable for a handful of practice sessions even after that freshness was gone; ALU was not.

    In the end though, most polys do lose their 'zing' after 8-12 hours of hard hitting. Some a lot less than that (ALU really goes downhill after 2-3 hrs); some can last a little more than usual (WC & SP brand polys can last people up to 12-20 hrs... of course that depends on so many other factors too: racquet type, tension, how hard you hit, how much spin, etc etc.

    Short version: BBO is better than ALU for longevity, but not much better than most polys. Weisscannon & Signum Pro have the best longevity polys.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2012
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  6. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    I find BBO to be one of the longer lasting Luxilons, alot better tension maintenance than Alu.
     
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  7. 2ManyAces

    2ManyAces Rookie

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    M2 definitely has somewhat lame tension maintenance. really good the first like day though
     
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  8. BruceD

    BruceD Rookie

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    Thanks for the great, detailed reply!

    that's just what I was wondering about, thank youverymuch for the great info and the alternatives.
    I haven't noticed any change yet, but that's because I AM not a big hitter, myself. Right now my hardest hitting partner, is MYSELF- hitting against a wall i use to show kids the basics and get a workout, myself.
    On the court the other day (1st time since 92!), I was just feeding balls to a friend and his 8 yr old son.
    Other than a volley or two...and i do meen TWO, in a 2 hour session, I guess wasn't much of a workout for the strings..or ME.
    I'm getting the Fischer M-Pro no.1 98 strung for the 1st time. I got some strange looking string with it, but I think I'll try some Gamma Zo 17g-verve, a co-poly or Gamma TNT Touch 16 or 17 ga. I'm a technofreak, but this is still new to me, so all the input I get is appreciated!
    The Gammas are on sale, where I plan to take the strings, so since it's a "inet special", I'll buy them before I go in,.
    I'm steering towards the Gamma Zo-Verve, that touts it's DURABILITY, while the TNT brags about it's PLAYABILITY.
    I guess I can see how a multi-filament string would soon start to fray, after it's first thin outer coating breaks down, while the Zo-Verve looks to be 2-4 filaments wound together.
    The two you mentioned, are they poly's or multi's or?
     
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  9. JT_2eighty

    JT_2eighty Hall of Fame

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    Weiss Cannon and Signum Pro are two brands that 'mostly' make co-polys, but they also offer some multifilaments and synthetic guts. They are really known for their polys, especially their flagship co-poly: Signum Pro Poly Plasma (most often reviewed as the best tension longevity co-poly string).

    Weisscannon (makers of "Silverstring", "Scorpion" and "Mosquito Bite") also gets great reviews, and tend to be more arm-friendly than other brands like Luxilon.

    Gamma strings are middle of the road, some people like it, others don't. They tend to be overpriced, but if you found them on sale, TNT Touch is a very comfortable & powerful string; it will be a lot more powerful than any co-poly. Zo Verve is decent, and a uniquely made co-poly. I've used that one and found it to have a firm, muted feel. Definitely a control string with little power. It moves around a lot compared to other polys. Worth a try, but not at full price, in my opinion.
     
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