mains/crosses breaks, can I keep the other?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by ionutzakis, Apr 18, 2006.

  1. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    Thanks for a little support from sw stringer+sypl.I also had a lot of people tell me you cant string below 56 lbs.+ have control, which was not true at all.I have strung natural gut as low as 47 lbs.+ it played with great control, with certain racquets.

    I have been changing racquets more in the past year or so, i will find a great combo of strings+tension for 1 racquet then switch to another +that same set up wont play anything like it did on the racquet i was using.

    With a new racquet i have to experiment for at least a month to find the right string+tension, this is were just changing the x's can save you time+money.I am always surprised at how much just changing the x's can change the way a racquet plays.

    I always use natural gut mains+ i use the syn. x's to tame the power out of the gut.I play almost every day so i save one stick for matches only which i play 2-3 times a week.

    I can usually get at least 3 weeks out of my match racquet so after a week or so i change the x's.When i do this i put the replacement x's in a few lbs. lighter than i did the originals.

    I have had no problems period, even though all the experts that never try anything different tell me this is wrong.I have done this many many times on different racquets with no problem, even though you supposedly cant do this.
     
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  2. davidc24

    davidc24 Guest

    I am no expert on the construction of tennis racquets or what strains the materials can withstand which would be different for every racquet, but I am a senior mechanical engineering student.

    There's a reason that they have a tension range and that is because if you string your strings within that range, you will not exceed the elsatic region of deformation (deformation that isn’t permanent). There is also a safety factor worked into this tension range so you could go higher and still stay within the range of elastic deformation.

    I have cut the crosses out of my racquets, prince 03 tours, and restrung them without any adverse affects to the racquets on a two point mounting system stringer. From a theoretical perspective cutting the strings out is no worse on the frame than having them break. The tension on the frame is suddenly released and it is designed to withstand this.

    Also, how could you think that removing the tension in the horizontal direction on the racquet face would be any worse than applying only tension in the vertical direction every time that you string your racquet and tension the mains before the crosses?

    There is also a fatigue phenomenon that I think would be reduced as a result of only restringing the crosses instead of both the crosses and the mains. Fatigue results from cyclic loading that can break a material even if the load doesn't exceed the range of elastic deformation. Like when you bend a paper clip back and forth and eventually break it.

    When you cut the mains and the crosses the racquet goes to its original shape. Then you shorten the height of the racquet by tensioning the mains and actually make the racquet wider than its original shape. Then when you tension the crosses you shorten the width of the racquet and may lengthen it slightly compared to when just the mains are strung.

    On the other hand, when you cut only the crosses the width of the racquet changes but not the height. You eliminate the elongation and reshortening of the racquet therefore reducing the effects of the fatigue phenomenon.
     
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  3. sypl

    sypl Rookie

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    Yes, that's just what I was saying! And that's the way I would have said it if I were a mechanical engineering student :p
     
    #53
  4. Robbie_1988

    Robbie_1988 Semi-Pro

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    Hmmm I just started using Luxilon Big Banger Alu Power in the mains at 55 lbs with Wilson NXT 16 in the crosses at 53 lbs.

    My old set up used Wilson Stamina Spin 15L in the crosses also at 53 lbs. I told my stringer if the durability with the NXT in the crosses isn't bad then i'll stick permanently with this set up.

    Then he told me that I could restring just the NXT crosses if I want for every time that I snapped the crosses. However, after reading about the dangers of uneven stress on the frame, I'd like to thank you guys for your wisdom regarding the safety of the frame.

    I guess if people say that the tension difference between mains and crosses is TOO great then it would leave uneven stress on the frame. Since my Luxilon Big Banger Alu Power goes dead after a while and does lose a HORRIBLE amount of tension, restringing my NXT crosses at 53 lbs would be a huge difference in tension on the dead Luxilon Big Banger which were originally strung at 55 lbs.

    Listen to uncle Bob kids: don't do drugs... and restring with a fresh full set of strings.
     
    #54
  5. psp2

    psp2 Banned

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    I DO agree with you. The only time I would cut out a cross string and restring is when I have gut in the mains and I really don't want to waste a perfectly good set of gut.

    Here's a real scenario that I experienced. I strung up my SV PS85 with VS16 main/Gosen SM17 cross at 55/60. I took it out and hit with it several times (probably around 4hrs of hitting time). I really didn't like the feel of the stringbed. I don't know what it was, but it just didn't feel good to me. The VS gut was still in perfect condition, so I mounted the racquet back on my stringer (Alpha Revo 3k) and cut out the Gosen carefully. I realized that VS has lost some tension and simply estimated that it was around 46-48 lbs. I took out my half set of SPPP 18g that I had and strung up the crosses at 48lbs.

    Took it out that night and WOW!!! What a difference I felt. Could I have just cut out all the strings and started over? Yes, but IMHO, I would have NEVER discovered how much I like the PS85 at low tension. Should I have cut out all the strings (I had plenty of VS left)? I say no, while others who chimed in this thread would say yes. Is my SV in any more danger being subjected to "micro" fractures? Who the hell knows for sure......... IME, cutting out the crosses (with care) is no worse than having a cross pop on you during play.

    My rant....
     
    #55
  6. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    psp2's experience has demonstrated something learned when using careful consideration. i commend ur forethought. ;)
     
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  7. bmichaelia

    bmichaelia Rookie

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    Why are your crosses so low?

    Robbie - Just curious, but many people reduce the poly tension 5-10% from "normal", and have non-poly crosses about 2 lbs higher than normal. So I could see someone with your string setup using somewhere around 55 mains and 60 crosses. I recently used a TiMo hybrid setup at 54/60 and liked it a lot.
     
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  8. tenn15

    tenn15 Guest

    ******************************************************
    Foremost, I agree with the majority that you should not cut out crosses and leave the mains on hybrid sets. With that being said, I am going to contradict myself quickly by saying that I have broken the rule for a while now.

    Two scenarios:
    1. I have been stringing my sticks with BB ALU @ 61 in the mains and Sensation @ 63 in the Xs. Once the sensation frays (usually 3 or 4 crosses at the top of the sweet spot) it will wear down to just a few threads in the center which leaves about a 20 gauge string. At this point I will mount the stick and restring the crosses only. After some trial and error I found the tension loss is truly negligible in the first restring. I have followed this formula with two of my sticks for about a year with no problems yet. I leave another racket "clean" and just use it to feed balls during clinics.

    2. The local college team practices at our facility every day and often I get roped into stringing for them. All but two of the players are using a n6.1 tour or the n6.1 95. Wilson Enduro Tour in the Mains @ 60 and Sensation @ 62 in the Xs. They also will restring only the crosses, but the tension loss in the Wilson Tour is much greater than that in the BB ALU. The mains can only be used twice before it is dead. Again, I know that they have been using this strategy for this school year and have not had any problems with broken sticks besides anger management during practice. In addition, it is important to note that when the players head off to a tourney, we will make sure that we restring the entire stick so they have consistent tension in each.

    Overall, I want to reiterate that I do NOT advise leaving strings in the stick for more than one stringing, but realize that some do it with success. If anyone is thinking about it, make sure your realize the risk of destroying or at least shortening the life of your racket.
     
    #58
  9. Robbie_1988

    Robbie_1988 Semi-Pro

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    Why hello there. I don't have a perfectly reasonable answer to your question. I just prefer the feel of the stringbed with this set up after a bit of messing around with different setups.
     
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  10. Pusher

    Pusher Professional

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    Hey Tim,

    This thread gave me encouragement to try restringing only the X's. I tried it last night leaving the klip Legend in the mains (originally@56lbs) and restringing the crosses (syn gut@51lbs)) and it played great. But that raises another issue for me-if the racquet plays great when the gut mains have lost 8-10lbs of tension then should I initially string the mains at a lower tension or stay with my original tension?

    Good thread.
     
    #60
  11. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    I would say to stay at your original tension with a new string job.That is the great thing with nat. gut it plays good with age, sometimes better.I have used gut as low as 45 lbs. + it played great.

    You have to experiment to find what is best for you.What was the original tension of your first crosses?I put my syn. crosses in at 2- 4 lbs tighter than the mains.Then when i replace just the crosses i will drop them a couple of lbs.

    It is kind of a guessing game to know how much to put the replacement crosses in at, because you dont know how much the gut mains have lost.I do know that the syn. crosses loose tension a lot faster than the nat. gut mains.

    I have replaced the crosses 2 times + still used the original mains + each time i replace the crosses i will drop the 2 lbs.+ that has worked out real well.

    Glad to hear you had no problem with changing just crosses.I have done it so many times i dont even worry about it.I have been experimenting with all syn. string jobs, + i have found the main i like+ i will still change the crosses only to try + find the best combo.

    That is why i laugh at all these experts that say you cant do this, i have done it so many time with so many different racquets + never had a problem.

    One thing i have found is when you have the racquet in the stringer + you are ready to cut out the crosses, cut the first cross out on the bottom + then push the next couple of strings ahead + relieve the tension slowly + then cut the next one + keep repeating this to let tension off nice + slow.
     
    #61
  12. Pusher

    Pusher Professional

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    Going down a couple of pounds on the X restringing makes sense and I have done that with good results. I have also gone from a 16 ga. synthetic to a 17 ga on the restring with the tension kept the same-that also seeems to work well.

    I'm currently using PS wDuraflex on the crosses and they lose tension after 2-3 hrs. I have restrung the X's 3 times with excellent results.

    Saving lots of money while playing good tennis.
     
    #62
  13. bmichaelia

    bmichaelia Rookie

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    I think you are right on target in your thinking. If you premount the racquet and haven't had extensive use of the strings, your tensions aren't going to be much, if any, different. I recently did a full SPPP job on one of my racquets, but didn't like it much. I only played once with it, and set it aside. This weekend I mounted the frame, and just cut out the crosses, replacing with syn gut. My stringmeter indicates same tension as original.
     
    #63
  14. ibringtheHEAT

    ibringtheHEAT Semi-Pro

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    thanks for making this, I was wondering the same thing.
     
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  15. jkonecne

    jkonecne Rookie

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    Also the ones that didn't break can stay there for a while and then you have one good set of strings and one bad pair of strings. Then it would feel like you're constantly playing with different string all the time.
     
    #65
  16. ionutzakis

    ionutzakis Semi-Pro

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    I'm going to receive my stringing machine very soon. I can't wait to try to replace only the X's on my racquets that are strung with Kevlar.

    many combinations I will try to find the right partner for my Kevlar mains...
     
    #66
  17. rmiller774

    rmiller774 New User

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    If you are a skillful player and have found a string combination and tension that you really like you are very very lucky. Not every player has been able to achieve that goal. Once attained, please do not give up that perfect feel just to save a few dollars of string cost. I don't know of any accomplished player who would make such a sacrifice.

    If you are not particularly interested in competing but are mainly out for the exercise and a few laughs, well then go ahead with experimenting, saving a few dollars, and playing below your true skill level. You do not love to play tennis.
     
    #67
  18. 103xStateChamp

    103xStateChamp Rookie

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    I have never done it becuase I get my racquet strung free.
     
    #68
  19. mctennis

    mctennis Hall of Fame

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    Usually not a good idea since the tension cannot be checked for certain to match the new strings being put in. If they break prett fast after you have had it strung probably so. If over about 2 weeks no.
     
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  20. NebAce1

    NebAce1 Guest

    How do you get your racquet strung free?
     
    #70
  21. vsgut

    vsgut Rookie

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    consistent tension


    So you are saying it is important to have consistent tension when they play a tournament but not when they practice? What about when they are challenging each other for positions on the the team. What about elbow/shoulder problems.

    Ask any D1 team in the top 10 in the nation and ask them if they just get the crosses replaced. Ask any touring pro if it would be ok to string their racquet but they probably wouldn't have consistent tension racquet to racquet.

    Tell John Isner or Audra Cohen you are just going to replace the crosses!
     
    #71
  22. Pleiades

    Pleiades New User

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    I say by all means, do it! Yessiree...cut out those crosses and restring it. That way when your customer says this string job is really bad, he/she will come to me for a good string job.

    One of the stupidest ideas I've ever heard of.
     
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  23. EasternRocks

    EasternRocks Hall of Fame

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    that is possible but this might break even faster...u can do this if u want to save money or u dont have enough string. its much faster and it saves u more time.
     
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  24. Pleiades

    Pleiades New User

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    So basically, you're saying that you like a poor string job. And the fact that you do it all the time doesn't make it right. Well, for someone that likes a bad string job, it's ok.

    However, since it's your racquet, it's fine. I just hope you would never do this to a customer...unless your customer prefers a bad string job. Just makes no sense.
     
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  25. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    Hey pleiades, i am more picky about my string jobs than most people by a long shot.I never said it is the best way to string a racquet, of course the best string job is both the mains+ x's being new.

    When i used to use nat. gut mains with syn. x's i would do it because the syn. would lose tension so much faster than the gut.This would let me play with a better string job for longer, not a poor string job!

    Also when i change racquets i change strings a lot to get the right combo+ many times i think i have the right main but am not sure about the x's i want with it.So it is so much easier to just cut out the x's + change them, then go try that set up.I have done this twice in one day, then i might change just the x's again the next day.

    It saves much time+money, once i find the right combo i will always change both the mains+ the x's.My point is all these people that say you cant do this, the racquet will explode it will warp+on +on.They have never done it, but they know all about it.I have done it so many times with different racquets + different tensions i dont see the problem.

    I spend a lot of money on tennis string+ i am very fussy about my strings, right now i am using luxilon bb ace.This string plays great but not for that long.Even though it is $14 a set i change the string job after 5-6 days, so i can play with one of the best polys you can find in its best playing time.

    I have 2 racquets strung with this string, after using one for matches only for 5-6 days it becomes my practice racquet, then the new string job is for matches only.Does this sound like someone who likes a poor string job? By the way i only string for myself + a few friends+ i only have strung my racquets with the change the x's only technique.

    I use a yonex rds002 tour ul racquet, i string it with the bb ace at 66 lbs. on the mains+ 68 lbs on the x's.Even though the racquet max. tension says 60 lbs.This set up plays like a dream, at lower tensions there is not enough control so i crank it up until it plays right.

    So see i am not big on following these so called rules i find out what plays the best, the hell with what people say you should or should not do.I spend the time + money to find the best set up possible.

    Before you go wild about using a poly at that high of tension i also have a friend that uses bb ace at 70 lbs. on his n code 90. He has been doing this for 3 years now with no problems+ he is a excellent player, his racquet also has a max. tension of 60 lbs.So see the rules are meant to be broken!!!!
     
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  26. Pleiades

    Pleiades New User

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    Like I said, if you're doing it to your own frames, that's fine. I just find it unethical to do it to a customer. And high tension...that's also fine with me. I just point out to perspective customers that there is a negative side to high tension.

    Look, regardless of your reasons, you cannot match a fresh string job with what you do. Yes, you're experimenting and when you find that great combination by combining string that's in your frame with fresh string, you have a guess at best. How do you know what tension you are going to string when you decide to put fresh string in both Ms and Xs? It's not going to match what you experimented with unless you hit it by blind luck.

    And if you follow the tension loss curve, even with gut, your string jobs will trend downward on the tension...if the logic is followed to attempt to match the fresh string with the old string.

    I don't think the frame's going to explode, however, I would NEVER do it with a customer's frame. What if it happened for the first time and it's a customer's frame? You could be out a couple hundred dollars. Not worth it.

    Your frame...have at it. I just like to point out that this in NOT the best way to string a frame and want to make sure that the new stringers here aren't getting bad information.
     
    #76
  27. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    See pleiades thats one of the points.How do you know that once i find a good combination on a hybrid that it wont match once i put them both in new? Again someone telling me something they have never done, but know more about it even though i have actually tried this.

    Like i said when i used nat. gut main with a syn. x's, after a week or so the x's loss a lot more tension than the main.So i would put a new x's in a few lbs. less than the original + it would play good again for another week or so.

    I dont care what you think it would do, i have experienced it.It would play much better than if i left the original x's in + just kept playing with it until the gut main is gone.See i have done it both ways many times, unlike you who has never done it but seems to know all about it.

    With the way pacific toughgut holds tension compared to a syn. string, how much tension difference do you think there is in the 2 after hitting with them for a week or so? I can tell you there is a lot, so going by your logic as soon as there is a big difference in the 2 you should cut them out.

    But again that is not true, i have played with the gut mains+ syn. x's for a month + even though there is a big difference in the 2 tensions they dont play that bad.But that set up doesnt play as good as long as if i changed the syn. x's after a week or so.Again i know the difference because i have done this experiment while you have not.

    And you are wrong like i mentioned earlier saying that i cant find a good hybrid by just changing the x's.I have done this many times so i can find the right combo.

    When i find the x's that plays the best with the main i know that i want to use.I then put them both in new + they have always worked out great.As far as what tension to use them at i already know what tension i want the main at+ i usually string the x's 2 lbs tighter.

    I may vary the tension some with the future string jobs to fine tune it but i found the right hybrid combo with my shortcut that you say will not work.And once more i never ever said that this was the best way to string a frame.Also i only string for myself, so there is no chance of me ruining someones frame.

    The only reason i posted to this thread way back when was because i read so many posts that said you cant just change the x's, the racquet will break it will warp it will do this+that.

    I thought thats funny i have done this so many times with no problems what so ever that i had to respond.Like you everyone that said you could not do this has never even tried it.I am not giving bad information i am giving the facts on what i have actually done, not on some theory.
     
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  28. Burt Turkoglu

    Burt Turkoglu Rookie

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    Tim....don't listen to these guys....they sound like a bunch of know-it-all liberals.....I read this thread a long time ago and started replacing the crosses while in the stringer. Not only does the racket hit well but I like it better than an all new string job because it feels already broken in. (kevlar mains/gut crosses) I remember back in the 70's, we used to get patch jobs done all the time. Funny but I remember liking the patch jobs better than the complete restring. I won 2 state tournaments then with a patch job of Blue Star....lol....
     
    #78
  29. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    Burt Turkoglu, i do like your comparison to know it all liberals, that is funny.Now that you mention it it does remind me of some of the bleeding heart liberals i work with.

    I am glad to hear you have had good results with changing the x's only, after you do it so many times it really is no big deal at all.

    I do love the great information i read on this site, but it cracks me up how so many who have never even tried this can tell me how bad it is when i have done it with no problems over 50 times.

    I have another guy telling me about the specs on the racquet that i own + have been using for over 4 months now+ he is still arguing the specs he got off a website, but yet they differ from what is on my racquet.

    But he still thinks he is right, even though he has not even touched one of these racquets. Some of these guys just cant admit thier wrong no matter how much it is proven!!
     
    #79
  30. Burt Turkoglu

    Burt Turkoglu Rookie

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    I agree....there is some great information on this site and I have learned so much. I read all of the opinions and, if it sounds intriging, I may give it a try and experiment. If it works ....great....if it doesn't....nothing ventured, nothing gained......this topic was reminding me when everyone thought the world was flat....it was blasphemy if you spoke otherwise.....also reminds me of the global warming debate...
     
    #80
  31. drfredc

    drfredc New User

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    I recently restrung the Xs of a poly that broke after one or two sets (usually last 1-2 months). I figured somehow I nicked it during stringing. I mounted the racquet & removed the Xs.

    Then I gave the mains a tuning test -- plucked them to see how their tone/tension varied. Curiously, one side of the mains had a much higher tone/tension than it's opposing side -- they should be balanced. I balanced the tension out by 'pulling' tension around the mains. I'm not sure what happened to cause the imbalance in the mains, perhaps a couple hard hits on one side of the racquet moved the main string tension around?

    Anyway, I proceeded to restringing the Xs. I added an extra 2 pounds to the Xs tension, figuring the slightly tighter Xs would restore some minor tension to the mains as the Xs squeeze the frame to make it longer, tightening the mains in the process.

    It's worked fine for just over a month now, which is about the normal life of strings in my racquets.
     
    #81
  32. gerikoh

    gerikoh Semi-Pro

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    good grief! good thing i got 2 polys at this time
     
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  33. Hardcourt1

    Hardcourt1 New User

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    If you break your crosses it would be heck trying to weave mains in and it would casue to much stress on the raquet its worth the couple of extra minutes to just start fresh
     
    #83
  34. dak95_00

    dak95_00 Professional

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    I'm going to go w/ the engineering student on this one.

    First, I've never broken a x string. I don't know why but it has never happened. I've never broken a string that wasn't a main and just above the center of the string bed. I once broke 3 at one time and the sound was so loud that I was afraid to look at my racquet for fear that it had broken. I've never been one to cut my strings out right away either. I've left the x strings in a racquet by themselves for a lengthy period of time too before I got to restring the racquet too.

    The only argument that I read that might've made sense was about tension loss and consistency. The rest of you must be crazy. My racquets are over twenty years old, abused and still going strong and I wouldn't be above stinging my mains and walking away to come back hours later to finish the job. If my racquet hasn't broken from its landings on court, it' not going to break from an occasional 1 sided string job either.

    Prince Graphite 90s w/ Prince ProBlend at 63lbs both ways.

    How do you break a cross string?
     
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  35. bmichaelia

    bmichaelia Rookie

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    "How do you break a cross string?"

    I haven't either, but in some hybrids, especially the "Mojo" hybrid w Klip Legend mains and Isospeed Pro crosses, people commonly report breaking the crosses first.
     
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  36. YULitle

    YULitle Hall of Fame

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    He isn't wrong. Doing this is hazardous to a racket (period.) A 6 point mounting system does not off-set or negate the ill effects. A 20 point mounting system wouldn't (obviously exaggerating.) The fact is that you are removing the counter balancing force needed to maintain the structural integrity of the racket. ON TOP OF THAT, you are applying a greater relative tension on one side when you re-string the crosses. The mains have lost a tremendous amount of relative tension compared to the fresh crosses. so you're effectively over stressing it TWICE.

    So no, don't do it.

    If anyway offers this type of service to you, follow these steps:
    1. Grab racket
    2. Run!

    As someone said earlier, strings are cheaper than rackets. Just restring it.
     
    #86
  37. YULitle

    YULitle Hall of Fame

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    And by anyway, of course, I mean anyone. :p

    Not a Champion Speller.

    I also wanted to add that, my views are purely from a customer service stand-point. For those of you that string your own rackets: If the playability is the same to you, by all means, string however you want. String the crosses first before the mains if it makes you happy! From a customer service stand-point, I can't honestly re-string someone racket in that way because what I am providing for them is not what they reasonably expect. The feel will be different from the fresh string job they received prior. It just isn't the same.

    Again, if you don't notice the difference, or it allowed you to discover a better feeling tension, great. I just wouldn't ever string my customers rackets in that way.
     
    #87
  38. jamauss

    jamauss Hall of Fame

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    If you string 2-piece, and break the mains, how in the world do you save the X's and just replace the mains? Wouldn't it be impossible since the X's tie off around main strings? Is it only possible when you tie the X's on other X's?

    And I would assume this is pretty much impossible to save either mains or x's when stringing 1-piece, right?
     
    #88
  39. bmichaelia

    bmichaelia Rookie

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    Agree. Even if you could get around the tieoff problem, you still have the tension problem. Maybe through trial and error you could figure out the correct machine tension to use, to come close to the original tension that the mains ended up with, but it seems crazy to try. I don't mind replacing just the crosses on my own racquet, but would never try to replace just the mains.:shock:
     
    #89
  40. curazyass

    curazyass New User

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    Isn't it only possible to replace the crosses and not the mains? Regardless of racquet stress, if you pop a main, you have to replace the entire string bed. If you pop a cross, it's possible to just replace the cross. POSSIBLE, but not recommended.
     
    #90
  41. curazyass

    curazyass New User

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    So thats cool... I posted a reply.... and then I read the post right above mine - PRETTY much saying the same exact thing. lol. That's great.
     
    #91
  42. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    You can only replace the cross seperately.I see there are some more experts that know everything about just changing the x's but have never done it.

    Whatever you guys want to think go ahead, i have done this so many times on so many different racquets with many different tensions+ absolutely have had no problems whatsoever. But i know that doent mean anything to all of you that have never tried it but know so much about it.

    I mean i have done it over 50 times on many different racquets with no problems at all.But i guess that does not mean anything. I will say that this is not the best way to string, but the reason i would do it is to come up with best hybid set up i could with out wasting so much time + string.Once i find the right combo i string the whole racquet at once.

    In the past when i used nat. gut the syn. x,s would lose tension 3 times faster than the gut so after a week or so i would change just the x,s + it worked perfect.

    By the way going by a lot of what the nay sayers are stating, i dont think you should use a hybrid setup anytime, because the 2 different strings are losing tension at different rates.Doesnt this put undo stress on the frame also?
     
    #92
  43. YULitle

    YULitle Hall of Fame

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    tlm:

    No, the margin is much smaller than the one when you cut JUST the crosses out.

    0/45 vs. 45/50

    And not doing it doesn't make us less of an expert. We're basing this off of years of experience, NOT MINE, but those many many stringers who came before. Also, it's wisdom from the manufacturers themselves.

    But let's be clear, I don't know a thing about sky diving AND I've never done it.
    But I know that doing it without a parachute is dangerous.
    Not that just cutting out the crosses is just as dangerous, obviously, but the point is there. Personal experience isn't always the wisest path to knowledge. Sometimes we have to stand on the shoulders of giants.
     
    #93
  44. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    What years of experience? Years of never knowing anyone who has tried this+ nobody who can prove that it damages anything.For the 3rd time i will point out that this technique is for my own personel racquets, not customers.

    The manufacturers also say never go over the tension recomendations.Have you ever done that? One of my hitting partners strings his n code 90 at 70 lbs. with luxilon bb ace. The racquet says 60 lbs maximum, he has been doing this for 4 years now+ no problems at all.

    Would this also be another one of those things that should never be done? Is his racquet going to explode at anytime?This guy plays lights out with this set up+ he will not change even though he is going over the rec. tension.

    Did you read some of the posts by others who have tried this technique with no problems? Did you read the post from the engineer who thinks this puts less stress on the frame than stringing the entire racquet? Which i think makes good sense, by just relacing the x's you are actually putting less stress on the frame!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    #94
  45. racquet_jedi

    racquet_jedi Professional

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    I've heard that Luxilon strings lose tension pretty fast...
     
    #95
  46. YULitle

    YULitle Hall of Fame

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    tlm: relax

    Only doing it on your own racquets is always fine. ALL poor stringing practices are fine, if you only do them on your own. I think you'll find that I'm pretty consistent in that point.

    BUT, the years of experience is by people who don't just string for themselves. Who string 10,000 racquets a year. Who see more variety in racquets and strings and setups than you or I could possibly imagine. Stringing isn't as new as you are to it. People have been stringing racquets for a long time and there are still people in this industry who were around when it got going in a big way. And, one thing that you can be sure of is that there is doubt ENOUGH in the practices we are discussing to not suggest them.

    Does that mean that, if you string a racquet above the recommended tension OR just replace the crosses/mains, that the racquet will implode? No.

    But that doesn't mean that it's an acceptable way to string racquets in a professional way.

    Because it isn't.
     
    #96
  47. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    Like i said before i do this when i am trying new hybrid string setups+ when i am finding the best string set up on a new racquet. In the past i did it with nat. gut hybrid setups to get more time out of the gut.

    And also i said i had absolutely no problems, no racquets warping or cracking or anything.It would seem that if this is such a dangerous practice i would have broke a dozen frames by now.

    Stringing 10,000 racquets a year really has nothing to do with this discussion.The same goes with how long someone has been stringing.If someone has been stringing for 25 years+ doing thousands of racquets a year, but has never changed just the x's, they would not know anything about it.

    Stringing for money is all about production, it is when you string for yourself+ play tennis with your string jobs is when you find out what works+ what doesnt.Stringing tennis racquets is not exactly rocket science.How long do you think it takes to become a good stringer?

    I know that after even 30 stringjobs anyone could be a pretty good stringer. But after a couple hundred stringjobs+ few years under your belt you should be a very good stringer, if not then you shouldnt be stringing.I dont see how anyone could improve much as a stringer after a year or so of doing it, other than in how fast they can string.Which has nothing to do with quality.

    I use a full poly set up now + string the entire racquet, i have not changed just the x's on my new racquets in some time. I did a few times at the beginning when i was experimenting with hybrid set ups. That was my point, i have proven many many times that you can do this technique with no problems.

    I never said that it is the way you should string all the time.The original question of this thread was can this be done, which i have proven time+ time again that it can.

    I am very fussy about my string jobs, i take my time+ do a top quality job. I play tennis 5-6 days a week all year long, i use a new string job for almost every match, after 3 hours of playing a new string job it is only for practice after that.

    So i am stringing twice a week or so on the average.But when i change frames or string types i will often be stringing at least once a day.

    I have spent thousands of dollars in the last few years experimenting with all types of strings+ tensions.I am not one of those players that use a string for months or until it breaks. I fully understand how important the string is to how well a racquet plays.
     
    #97
  48. Clintspin

    Clintspin Semi-Pro

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    I just can't see how this would hurt the racquet. The first time you string any racquet it is mains loaded just the same as it would be mains loaded if you cut out the crosses only. I am not saying it is a great idea but I can't see it hurting a racquet. You see players break three mains quite often and leave the racquet in their bags for hours if not days. Yet, their frames are fine.

    I think if you mount the racquet and then cut out the crosses, not much is going to happen to the racquet.

    Anybody ever do this and see the racquet have space in between the mounting?
     
    #98
  49. YULitle

    YULitle Hall of Fame

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    Look, I don't think anyone here is saying that you can't do it.

    It's obvious that you can.

    But yes, experience has shown that it isn't a good practice, not to mention poor in the consistent repeatable playability department. End of story.
     
    #99
  50. vegasg

    vegasg New User

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    Read through this thread and am wondering about my following situation:
    I am a newbie when it comes to stringing and I did a poor job on tieing off the cross to the point of it actually came undone when I was playing last night. So I am faced with the prospect of restringing the whole thing or cutting the crosses and only redoing the crosses. I strung it Monday night, played Tuesday night and am planning to restring it tonight.

    I understand that this might lead to less consistent string job (and at this point my string jobs probably aren't very consistent anyway ) but how is the stress of cutting the crosses (and I wouldn't be cutting as much as unstrining) and immediately restrining different from the time it takes to start strining the crosses normally?
    g.
     

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