Max 200G

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by OTMPut, Jan 25, 2014.

  1. OTMPut

    OTMPut Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2008
    Messages:
    2,338
    I saw this in a seconds shop. Seems to be in a decent condition.
    Price is $55. Is it worth that much?

    What do you think?

    I play an occasional charity tournament with a Borg pro, may be I could use this next time.
     
    #1
  2. Tamiya

    Tamiya Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2013
    Messages:
    798
    Location:
    AU, SG, MY
    There's quite a few around if you keep your eyes open.

    I might pay that much if its a straight stick (no warp) thats been
    fully restored with fresh restring, good leather grip clean & fed,
    has original cover in good condition, paint isn't too flaking etc
     
    #2
  3. swizzy

    swizzy Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2013
    Messages:
    949
    Location:
    mostly at the baseline
    good condition? fair price without the shipping required to find a 200g normally.. go for it. amazing racket.
     
    #3
  4. hrstrat57

    hrstrat57 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    1,772
    Location:
    RI
    Agree if in top nick you are good to go!
     
    #4
  5. OTMPut

    OTMPut Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2008
    Messages:
    2,338
    Thank you guys!
     
    #5
  6. MrRandom247

    MrRandom247 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2015
    Messages:
    220
    Location:
    Perth, Australia
    Juts grabbed a 200g Pro with original cover in 7/10 condition for $7.
    Decayed Wilson grip needs replaced.
     
    hrstrat57 likes this.
    #6
  7. joe sch

    joe sch Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    5,154
    Location:
    Hotel CA
    Its a GOAT racket made of flexible old school graphite that plays more like a woody with the grafil injection.
    BTW, lots more power than a Borg pro and 85si vs 65 head size.
     
    #7
  8. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2010
    Messages:
    8,138
    Location:
    Sweden
    That is rather expensive to me, but still well worth it. Like Joe says it plays a bit like a wood but only if you play soft. The fun trait of the manufacturing process is that it becomes heaps stiffer if you put some mustard on the ball. Combine that with its weight and you get a racquet which absolutely destroys the ball. Very fun racquet to play with.
     
    hrstrat57 likes this.
    #8
  9. swizzy

    swizzy Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2013
    Messages:
    949
    Location:
    mostly at the baseline
    definitely a racket that needs court time and not hung on a wall.. hits a heavy ball with great finesse as well.
     
    #9
  10. hrstrat57

    hrstrat57 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    1,772
    Location:
    RI
    Ha ha zombie thread, the OP needs to update us on how he likes his 200G
     
    #10
  11. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Messages:
    10,460
    Longtime max 200g guy here....loved it from 1983 until 1993 or 1994. I always felt that it had the softest touch but seemed to play firm when hitting hard. Is this because of the injection moulding process?
    Is there any real science behind this?

    I only wish they were more durable. And that i had kept more of them. Even the worn ones still feel awesome. Not to compete with, just for pure enjoyment.
     
    #11
  12. Backhanded Compliment

    Backhanded Compliment Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2011
    Messages:
    4,070
    The science is real I think... basically a dynamic stiffness because instead of a laminate it was a nylon/graphite material that didnt deform as much on hardhits... that makes it seem stiffer and controlled. I still take mine out on days when I want to be reminded of how awesome a flat forehand can be.
     
    #12
  13. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Messages:
    10,460
    ^respect the research!^

    Yeah, i hit with mine today. Cracked a very large, flat fh and a few treacherous drop-volleys.
     
    #13
  14. chrischris

    chrischris Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2010
    Messages:
    3,268
    Great racket .. despite it small head size it has a huge effective sweetspot.
    Ball Dwell time is awesome. :)
     
    hrstrat57 likes this.
    #14
  15. Racketdesign

    Racketdesign Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Messages:
    486
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    The only thing cooler than hitting with them was moulding them ;) Crude yet genius method of manufacturing a racket for its time!
     
    #15
  16. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Messages:
    10,460
    You must be Paul. I have been in touch with your excellent man here in the US, Andy.

    So many quenstions for you, man:

    Do you think foam-filled Angell frames can incorporate some of the incredible injection moulded feel?
    What was grafil?
    Some were made in W Germany, right....some in England? How and why?
    How are your frames made?
    Do you hit with a 90, 95 or hundred? Which stiffness do you use? 315g?
    Do you still have a few good max 200Gs and 300Is?
     
    #16
  17. suwanee4712

    suwanee4712 Professional

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2007
    Messages:
    1,032
    I loved some of the things that the 200G did for my game. Being a flat striker, I really could drive through the ball better. Some of the best down the line forehands and strokes hit on the stretch I ever hit were with that racquet. It felt so clean coming off the strings.

    But it was a very heavy racquet and it all but wrecked my timing on volleys for a while until I adjusted to it. I can still see in my mind's eye some critical forehand volleys that felt so good coming off the strings only to smack the top of the net right in the middle of the tape. Painful!
     
    Backhanded Compliment likes this.
    #17
  18. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    10,862
    All IMF racquets were made in England. They had whole series of compression molded (conventional molded) racquets made in West Germany such as the Silver Max, Max Competition, Black Max II, Max Power, Max Power Competition, and so on...
     
    #18
  19. Backhanded Compliment

    Backhanded Compliment Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2011
    Messages:
    4,070
    I pull my 200G out ocassionally and I can hit DTL forehands and backhands with it that are simply on a different magnatude than other frames... I think, poor ball... We all called it "The Doom Log" when I was a kid and using it. Special combo of supereme control but massive power on tap. I probably should have been using the PS85 but Ive got an antio wilson thing based mostly on the fact that the other players around me used wilsons. The 200g complimented my return game like no other frame... I guess that's why I stuck with it. Well that and the massive thumping groundstrokes it produced.
     
    hrstrat57 likes this.
    #19
  20. Racketdesign

    Racketdesign Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Messages:
    486
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    Hi. Great to hear you have been in touch with Andy!

    Answers to your questions -

    Unfortunately its hard to replicate that feel without using a nylon base and tempering the frames.
    Grafil was one of the industry's first "marketing materials"
    I fluctuate between frames.. depending how ambitious I am feeling.
    I wish I had a container load... Given the right investment we could do it all again :)
     
    #20
  21. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Messages:
    10,460
    Thanks vs babolat and racketdesign, for your responses.
    Backhanded compliment...we have similar names and similar games...And we both used the 200g? Hmmmm. I might have to report us to the mods for being the same person with two different usernames.

    Well, i was always only an occasional flat hitter. More of an allcourt, attacking spin guy.
    So i guess we are just different enough. Mods can move along...nothing to see here.
     
    Racketdesign likes this.
    #21
  22. joe sch

    joe sch Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    5,154
    Location:
    Hotel CA
    #22
  23. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Messages:
    10,460
    Hello. Are you saying you could make a batch of 200G frames?
    Is there a way to make this frame in a 95 head? Or would it break too easily?
     
    #23
  24. SpinControl

    SpinControl New User

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2015
    Messages:
    12
    Used to have one in my teens, but the head twisted on a 65# string job.
    Knowing what I know now (wisdom; customer service), it should have gone back to Dunlop, but I just kept it.

    I liked the racquet; had nice power and touch.
    A little blocky, but surprisingly good at the net.
     
    #24
  25. Racketdesign

    Racketdesign Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Messages:
    486
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    Rackets moulded from a nylon/carbon matrix would definitely be possible again given the right amount of investment and design. Materials have moved on plenty since the 200G was produced so a 95 or larger head would also be possible.
     
    #25
  26. Ciaron

    Ciaron Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2014
    Messages:
    675
    Location:
    South Africa
    #26
  27. michael valek

    michael valek Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2004
    Messages:
    287
    i couold never get on with any of the versions except the first one. they didnt feel as solid to me. the best were the originbal paintjob pro versions. little bit lighter and more flexy, if i remember rightly. someone correct me........
     
    #27
  28. Backhanded Compliment

    Backhanded Compliment Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2011
    Messages:
    4,070
    Lol, my girlfriend thinks all of these posters here are actually me having a conversation with myself... she's an artist (whose work makes people question their sanity a bit) and of Scottish descent. She has a wicked sense of the absurd.

    Ive developed my more modern topspin game when I came back to the sport 6 years ago. I switched to a semiwestern forehand grip but I still love to flatten it out occasionally... I vary it a lot. I look like a viking too, so unless you are very Nordic looking we should be ok.

    ...and suddenly a lot of rather crazy tennis players started to get a lot crazier with just the theoretical possibility of this.
     
    #28
  29. Racketdesign

    Racketdesign Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Messages:
    486
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    Let's hope some of them fancy investing and getting involved then ;)
     
    #29
  30. 6-2/6-4/6-0

    6-2/6-4/6-0 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2011
    Messages:
    701
    Location:
    about 5000 feet up...
    Worked for about a year on the design problem of improving on the original IMF by making it easier to produce while removing the head size issues (collapsing frames over 90 sq in). What a fantastic exercise (I do product and intellectual property development as my day job in other fields). One of these days I keep thinking that I'd like to take the IP and give it a go...
     
    #30
  31. Racketdesign

    Racketdesign Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Messages:
    486
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    Just curious. When you say "worked" was that just something you did on your own or for a company?
     
    #31
  32. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2011
    Messages:
    287
    A gentleman who worked on the first generation of graphite racquets in the mid '70s explained to me once that earlier efforts to injection-mold tennis racquets all resulted in failure, and the engineers came to realize that it was impossible to cram enough carbon fibers into the matrix to achieve the strength per unit mass ratio required in a proper tennis racquet and still have a matrix that would flow during the injection molding process. The Dunlop engineers obviously figured out a way around that problem to make something that was more than workable. Nevertheless, the thick beam cross section, hefty weight, buttery flex (which many classic-fans here consider an asset rather than a liability), and the well known warping tendency of the 200G all suggest that those design engineers were pushing against some hard limitations.

    Would it be possible to explain in lay terms what exactly has changed during the past three decades that could have 'softened' these limitations?
     
    #32
  33. Racketdesign

    Racketdesign Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Messages:
    486
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    It would be possible but it's not something I'm able to discuss in detail at the moment.
     
    #33
  34. Don't Let It Bounce

    Don't Let It Bounce Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2009
    Messages:
    1,675
    I think there were larger versions of the Max 200G. Wasn't the Max 500i 95 sq in and the Max 800i 98 sq in?

    In 1992 Prince came out with something similar to the Dunlop Max series, in the sense that their Vortex rackets (97 and 107 sq in) were made of carbon fibers suspended in thermoplastic instead of in the usual thermoset resin. Like the Dunlops, they had the "dynamic stiffness" effect, they protected elbows in a way that makes the PK Kinetic rackets seem like Pure Drives strung with steel wire, and they absorbed vibration like they were carved out of a giant vibe damp – so well, in fact, that many tournament players complained of a lack of feedback. That led to the last generation of Vortexes being targeted at recreational players, and the very high production cost (they retailed for $400, IIRC) killed off the Vortex series after only a few years.

    Unlike the 80s Dunlops, the 90s Princes were not made by injecting the thermoplastic-carbon fiber mixture into a mold. The carbon fibers in the Dunlops had to be much shorter than in ordinary rackets – 0.5" long or shorter, so that they could flow through the nozzle of the injection machine – and Prince was after a way to use the usual long fibers, even in a thermoplastic matrix, so they could wind, braid, and otherwise use engineer magic on the fiber orientation.

    (If I've gotten any of the above wrong, hopefully Racketdesign will correct me; he was there!)

    It looks like both the 1982 Dunlop patent and the 1991 Prince patent have lapsed, if there are any brave venture capitalists out there who can overcome the production and marketing challenges Prince couldn't overcome.
     
    Racketdesign likes this.
    #34
  35. deco0028

    deco0028 Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2011
    Messages:
    144
    Hi
    I just picked one up for a ridiculously low price. I do not think the seller knew much about the racquet. Good condition Max 200g, made in England, with some patent numbers. I cannot see the grip size. It has a black Dunlop grip on it, I think it is black leather. I did not know these racquets came with various coloured grips, unless the grip is not original. Cannot tell what the grip size is, but it looks to be in good nick. I think I will restring it with a sun gut. Any ideas what is ideal tension on these?
    Thanks
     
    #35
  36. deco0028

    deco0028 Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2011
    Messages:
    144
    It weighs 395g strung with dampener, no overgrip. Wow, that is heavy. I play with a 362g Dunlop 4D 200 Tour, that is a step up in weight. Cannot wait to try it.
     
    #36
  37. Ciaron

    Ciaron Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2014
    Messages:
    675
    Location:
    South Africa
    It came in light brown (camel color) leather and black leather. String it at 55 pounds I reckon .
     
    #37
  38. deco0028

    deco0028 Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2011
    Messages:
    144
    Thanks, Ciaron.
     
    #38
  39. sarmpas

    sarmpas Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    1,034
    Location:
    Talk Tennis
    My bruv still has the 800i in his garage and I did have a 400i. The 800i was a completely different racket. Same racket line Max Xi/tech. however it has a variable width profile. Thicker in the head than the throat. Yes it is 98". Solid old school racket.

    The Max 400i, I had, had identical physical dimensions to the 200G/200i. The difference was I suspect in the stiffness rating.
     
    #39

Share This Page