MAXXply's annual Wimbledon clothing policy rant 2014:

Discussion in 'Pros' Racquets and Gear' started by MAXXply, Jul 5, 2014.

  1. MAXXply

    MAXXply Hall of Fame

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    Wimbledon's clothing policy, as far as I understood it, was always "Clothing shall be predominantly white".

    Somewhere in the past fourteen years, that seems to have changed to "Clothing shall be exclusively white with the exception of small brand logos".

    Now, every player seems to be dressed for Phys Ed / gym class; the outfits are unremittingly bland and are a throwback to the late 40s and early 50s. Federer has commented already about the Club's rules; that's cool - their club, their rules.

    My point is that Wimbledon is suffering a big case of corporate and institutional amnesia by insisting on the strictly all-white policy to the exclusion of coloured trims and flashes. The longer it goes on the more entrenched that amnesia becomes.

    The club may as well go so far as to expunge the victories of past champions from Borg onwards, since their outfits transgress current policies and featured much more colour (and iconically so) than today's Wimby outfits. Yes, how about striking Edberg and Becker's titles too, because they dared to include geometric patterns and colours.

    Can you imagine the outrage if Fed or Rafa walked on court with a red jacket a la Borg or McEnroe 1980? Or McEnroe's Tacchini shirt c.1984? (the one with the red chest stripe)
     
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  2. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    I heard they now also ban bright colored undershorts, panties, and sports bras for the women, like they used to wear. And as Federer found out last year, you can't even have bright colored soles on the bottom of your shoes which almost no one will even see.

    It's terrible that now all the players wear all completely white so that it's hard to tell who's who's when watching matches on TV since they're all dressed the same. :(
     
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  3. newpball

    newpball Legend

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    Perhaps it is time to get rid of that old TV?

    [​IMG]

    :grin:
     
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  4. USASAgencyman

    USASAgencyman New User

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    The "White Sleeve"

    My only observation would be that Federer (or anyone prior with the same problem), should have asked that it be replaced with with flesh toned version, perhaps Ace regular bandages could be brought out in various skin tones.

    I see no value in fishnet or sheer; or lace topped even with a garter... No protection from the sun, dont'cha see. :)

    *****

    Seriously, it was a major distraction in white! I would not be able to concentrate on the serve about to come my way.

    As for whites, I guess I'm old fashioned enough to think they are OK, but some color trim is welcome to my eyes.

    B.
     
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  5. RUC

    RUC Rookie

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    Totally agree......just look up pics from the 70s thru 2000........Borgs iconic Green/Blue FILA....JMac and Tanner from 1979 - 1984 in the ST and even Conners with his RED/Whtite and Blue tops from 76 and 77........etc

    The "All White" rule is new and silly - seems like the current board members even more conservative than the ones from the 60s - 1999
     
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  6. MAXXply

    MAXXply Hall of Fame

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    I hope a player or players take a stand next year (with the backing of their apparel sponsors of course) and shock horror, start to feature coloured collars, coloured sleeve stripes, coloured shirt plackets (the centre strip of buttons on a shirt) and rainbow coloured stripes on shorts.

    I will campaign the AELTC Club to remove from the Honour Roll the Wimbledon titles of Borg, Connors, McEnroe, Becker, Edberg, Cash, Stich, Sampras and Krajicek until such time as coloured trims are permitted to return to apparel.

    Just picture Mac and Borg 1980 and they walked out onto Centre Court like I saw the Bryan Bros walk on moments ago for their doubles final - in collarless baggy a** gym crew shirts.

    Imagine Evonne Cawley 1980 Wimby champ in that GOAT-funky FILA burnt orange track top, and substitute it with a pathetic tank top a la Asics/ Sam Stosur. Or Becker's 1985 Ellesse two tone blue track top with a ... you get the picture - a blancmange of nothingness.
     
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  7. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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    [​IMG]

    So this is really not allowed no more? When did they change?

    lol I was thinking the same thing. One of my Tv's doesn't have a highdef box and it is difficult to see who's who. But on the HD Tv you can immediately distinguish everybody.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2014
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  8. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Can you tell who's playing who?


    [​IMG]
     
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  9. FedLIKEnot

    FedLIKEnot Rookie

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    I am all for tradition and it is one of the nice things about Wimbledon that it is so tradition rich but I would love to see the athletes able to wear some trim colors or maybe a collar a different color.

    In the past it seems white based shoes, shorts, and shirt was all that mattered. Now it is ALL white. It is of no surprise at this years slam all the manufactures produced all white kits, with white, grey, black, or gold trim (and even that being minimal). Tough Asics did have that blue green color in there shoes...
     
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  10. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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    No, that's why you should get HD.
     
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  11. USASAgencyman

    USASAgencyman New User

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    Apologies, but I must step in here...

    That is without question a screengrab of Billie Jean King playing some forgotten male supremicist in a media bonfire.

    I am so glad he is gone from history. The Errornet was not yet in its full glory during his 15 min of infamy!

    B.
     
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  12. JW10S

    JW10S Hall of Fame

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    1.) I'm amazed that some people can get so worked up over such trivial things that they feel compelled to run to their keyboards and write 'annual' rants. Get over it already, there are real issues to cry over--this is not one of them.
    2.) I love that Wimbledon is different from not only the other Slams but all the other tournaments. Different is a good thing. I love that it is played on grass, I love the 'almost completely white' rule, I love the traditions. The white looks good against the grass courts. The entire rest of the year players can wear colors. That they can't for 2 weeks is not a big deal at all. The tournament makes huge, and I mean huge, profits, so they clearly don't have it all wrong--you do.
    3.) I don't need the players to wear different colored shirts to know who's who. You've really got to be kidding me with that one. The men's doubles final must have been particularly confusing for you--you must have thought the Bryans were at times playing against each other.
    4.) There are still tennis clubs in the US and around the world that have all white clothing policies, so Wimbledon is not the only place you see this.
    5.) Wimbledon doesn't, nor does anyone else for that matter, care what you think--your infantile whining will change nothing.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2014
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  13. Verbian

    Verbian New User

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    Exactly this! It is expected to look 'classy' but just looks incredibly homogenous.
     
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  14. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    I have HD. It just makes everyone's clothing look even whiter. When they show the entire court during points, all you see are two guys all in white running around.
     
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  15. stringertom

    stringertom G.O.A.T.

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    It will be easy to determine who is who tomorrow without HD...one will look comfortable on grass, the other not so much.
     
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  16. California

    California Rookie

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    Great post.
     
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  17. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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    No, it doesn't. HD is an increase in resolution, allowing the viewer to see far more detail, contrast and sharpness.
     
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  18. baseline_monster

    baseline_monster Professional

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    For me its quite simple. Wimbledon is the best and most prestigious tournament in the world. In the 90s I remember alot of the clothing to be cool with good patterns for the time. But then it went to far, and that's why they have made it as strict as they have. A case of brands taking it to far has ruined it.
     
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  19. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat Legend

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    All-White Is the Style, Whether the Players Appreciate It or Not

    Wimbledon 2014: All England Club Tightens Its Dress Code


    By BEN ROTHENBERGJULY 4, 2014


    WIMBLEDON, England — Wimbledon has long required players to wear outfits that are “predominantly in white” or “almost entirely in white.”

    But this year, a 10-part decree was introduced in the competitors’ guide stating that “white does not include off-white or cream” and allowing only “a single trim of color no wider than one centimeter.” The almost-all-white rule now explicitly covers caps, headbands, bandannas, wristbands, shoes and even “any undergarments that either are or can be visible during play (including due to perspiration).”

    Richard Lewis, chief executive of the All England Club, said the time was right to make accessories subject to the policy used for shirts, shorts and socks. Small sponsor logos may include color, and medical supports can be colored if “absolutely necessary,” the guide said.

    The usually unflappable Roger Federer, a seven-time Wimbledon champion, sounded exasperated this week when asked about the rules.
    “White, white, full-on white,” he said. “I think it’s very strict. My personal opinion: I think it’s too strict.”
    If you look at the pictures of Edberg, Becker, there was some colors,” Federer added, referring to the Wimbledon champions Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker.

    The more specific dress code, which clothing designers and players were notified of months in advance, has been strictly enforced. In the qualifying rounds, the American Rhyne Williams was told to cover the black underside of his hat brim with white tape before he could continue playing. Even Martina Navratilova, a nine-time Wimbledon champion, was told that the pale blue stripe on the skirt she was wearing for an invitational doubles match was against the rules.

    Navratilova questioned how a tradition was being upheld if the type of clothing she had been allowed to wear for decades, some of which is in the Wimbledon Museum, was suddenly forbidden.

    “I think they’ve gone too far,” she said.

    The crackdown comes after years of clothing manufacturers’ adding more pops of color to Wimbledon ensembles in an effort to stand out in a sea of white. In 2010, Serena Williams wore an off-white dress with red trim and bright red undershorts. She described the outfit as a tribute to strawberries and cream, Wimbledon’s traditional snack.



    When she won her fifth Wimbledon title, in 2012, Williams accented her white dress with a headband, wristbands and undershorts in magenta. Williams’s opponent in the final, Agnieszka Radwanska, wore black undershorts. Victoria Azarenka, Williams’s semifinal opponent, wore undershorts that were bright blue. Marion Bartoli won last year’s women’s final while wearing a beige headband.

    One of the tipping points for the rule change might have come last year, when Federer wore white shoes with orange soles for his first-round match. Tournament officials told him that the color was too much and that he had to change his shoes for the next match.

    Tennis whites became a phenomenon in the late 1800s to prevent the appearance of unseemly sweat stains as the sport became increasingly popular at social gatherings.

    Continue reading the main story

    “One problem which simply had to be addressed very early on was that of perspiration,” Valerie Warren wrote in “Tennis Fashion: Over 125 Years of Costume Change.” “As increased skill at the game led to more movement on court, this in turn led to the dreaded problem of perspiration causing the appearance of embarrassing damp patches on colored fabrics. It was quite unthinkable that a lady should be seen to perspire!”

    Wearing white at Wimbledon was a matter of tradition, not stipulation, for the next six decades.

    Ted Tinling, a British player who pioneered fashions in women’s tennis after his retirement, made one of the first introductions of color at Wimbledon in 1947 when he sewed short trims of light blue and pink onto the hems of dresses for the British player Joy Gannon.

    In his memoir “Sixty Years in Tennis,” Tinling recalled the uproar caused by a similar dress he made for Betty Hilton the next year when she played in the Wightman Cup, a team competition held at Wimbledon. Hazel Wightman, the namesake of the event and a matriarchal figure in American tennis in that era, objected to the intrusion of color and even suggested that Hilton had lost because she was “self-conscious about the color on her dress.”



    During his five Wimbledon title runs, Bjorn Borg wore a white shirt with green pinstripes and a navy collar, which became a popular seller for Fila. Credit Associated Press
    The next day, Wightman asked the Wimbledon committee to ban the dresses, and in 1949 there were signs in the Wimbledon dressing rooms saying, “Competitors are required to wear all-white clothing.”

    Tinling would venture into color again in 1962, when he made Maria Bueno a dress with a lining in shocking pink. The next year, Wimbledon made it a condition of entry that the competitors’ clothing had to be “predominantly in white throughout,” a vaguely worded rule that was written in all capital letters and enforced unpredictably, but carried the threat of disqualification if a player failed to comply.

    When the United States Open became the first international tournament to allow colored apparel, in 1972, Wimbledon did not budge. Even a decade later, the competitors’ guide said, “The British Public still likes to see tennis and cricket played in whites.”

    Still, large swatches of color on shirts and dresses showed up at the tournament, and players enjoyed seeing how far the rule could be bent.

    “I had all white on, with white bloomers, but they had red ruffles,” said Chris Evert, a three-time Wimbledon champion. “They weren’t noticeable at all because our dresses were longer. But the guy, he lifted up my skirt and looked at the red and told me to go back to the changing room and change them.”

    Enforcement was inconsistent. During his five Wimbledon title runs, Bjorn Borg wore a white shirt with green pinstripes and a navy collar, which became a popular seller for Fila. Designers for the company assumed that they would not need approval in 2001 when dressing its players in an identical design as part of a retrospective collection, but the All England Club rejected the design, and emergency white shirts had to be raced from Italy to England.

    Continue reading the main story Continue reading the main story

    Continue reading the main story

    Martin Mulligan, a 1962 Wimbledon finalist who has worked for Fila in global tennis promotions for 41 years, said he appreciated the clarity but not the effect of the new regulations.

    “Clothing manufacturers really don’t like it because we all look the same, always,” he said.

    Danny Lieberman, vice president of apparel for Fila, said sales of white tennis outfits tended to lag behind sales of the same designs in more vivid colors.

    “All-white, generally in the United States, is not your best-selling collection,” he said. “People here like color.”

    Pat Cash won Wimbledon in 1987 wearing a black-and-white checkered bandanna, and he kept the accessory as he made the transition to the seniors circuit. Cash won the senior invitational doubles event at Wimbledon the past four years, but he pulled out of this year’s competition last week because of back pain and the new rules, which would have required him to buy new specialized shoes for his surgically repaired knee, as well as a new bandanna.

    “I think white is great,” he said. “But I think it’s a little bit strict and a bit old-fashioned. Tennis in this country, and I think a lot of places around the world, was seen as a bit square, and for many years it’s broken out of that. Now it has sort of gone backwards a little bit in that direction. We want the kids to pick it up and want to play tennis, not to think, ‘Aw, I’ve got to wear white and collars and all that to play tennis?’ “

    But Venus Williams, who has her own clothing design company, EleVen, and often sports some of the most distinctive looks at tennis tournaments, did not bristle at the stricter rules.

    “I think it’s a nice change,” she said. “I think everyone just kind of glows in white.”
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/05/s...tyle-whether-players-like-it-or-not.html?_r=0

    The clothing that Borg, McEnroe, Becker, Edberg, Evert, Navratilova, Cash, and Lendl wore at Wimbledon was iconic but under today's rule they could not wear any of it. They look classy and cool. I say if youre going to go all white then you should have a collar only rule for the men. The guys wearing the white t-shirts look like they are in their undershirts or in gym class.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2014
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  20. MAXXply

    MAXXply Hall of Fame

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    1---This is TT forums - one dissenter's idea of a 'trivial thing' is another person's idea of a 'real issue'. And judging by the ex-pro's comments in Ben Rothenberg's NYT article (thanks VSBabolat), it is an issue for them too, and in the same context as I view it - "How can something that was ok years ago and embraced by the Club, suddenly be made verboten?"

    2---Since when is the profit-earning capabilities of an enterprise directly equated with correct judgement on sartorial matters? Are you saying a rich man means they are always right about what they wear and a financially poor but well-dressed person is not? Conflating Wimbledon's 'profits' with being wrong (as you do) does not mean I am wrong for thinking 'All white' is bad - it simply means the AELTC knows how to turn a buck from smart commercial operations. You know, overpriced merchandise, food and beverage, international broadcast rights, corporate packages etc.

    3---Read my OP; I am not the person saying the clothing rules make it hard to distinguish between players on-court. Personally I don't have a problem identifying respective players on the TV screen, HD or no-HD. My express point is that the Club's retrograde clothing rules embody a selective corporate amnesia and mindset that, like a totalitarian state's attempt at instigating Year Zero, tries to make the past (specifically, colour trims and/or patterns and designs on Wimby clothing) suddenly forbidden and evil. Unlike Cambodia, the AELTC seems to have succeeded on that aspect of cultural re-versioning.

    4---I am not railing against other clubs' apparel policies and am aware they have similar rules.

    5---Infantile whining is taken to mean the histrionic antics of babies, toddlers and children. I disagree I am being infantile about the matter; merely expressing a view that does not sync with yours. I suspect a few others here would agree with my general sentiments just as there are people who would agree with yours. And given Navratilova and Cash in the NYT article plainly echo my original sentiments, I am satisfied others more eminently placed to speak on such matters hold the same opinion as mine.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2014
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  21. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    So more contrast doesn't bring out the colors more, including white? :???:
     
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  22. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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    With HD, if identifying players by apparel, you can see the brand of shoe players wear.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2014
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  23. ASH1485

    ASH1485 Semi-Pro

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    why can't they just wear white!!
    why do we have to go around a simple policy that wimbledon see as tradition?

    i am ok with all white, can't Tennis have a special tradition somewhere?
     
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  24. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    Who cares? I've never been watching a tennis match at Wimbledon and thought "Oh, but gee, the colors are so boring :("

    I like the strict rules. It makes the tournament seem more prestigious and sets it apart from the other tournaments.

    And, really, why are the players complaining? A team employed by their sponsors does all the work to get their kits ready. It doesn't have any effect on them.
     
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  25. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Maybe it's my eyes but I can't seem to even make out which player is which, let alone what brand of shoes they are wearing since both the clothes and the shoes are all white:


    [​IMG]
     
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  26. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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    That image is not HD, that's why.
     
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  27. newpball

    newpball Legend

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    In 4K you could see the straw that Djokovic ate.

    :grin:
     
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  28. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    Kudos to MAXXply! I agree. Most people think Wimbledon too stodgy and stoic even though they have been probably the most progressive major since Open tennis. This whole clothing thing is not only a step back, it really lessens the enjoyment of the tournament for me. With this dress code, you can go back to 1975, Connors wouldn't have been allowed to wear his iconic red, white, and blue striped shirt!

    To me, the height of ridiculous came when they made Federer change shoes last year. That is just uncalled for. They should go back to the "predominantly" white rule.
     
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  29. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Sure looks like HD to me. The problem is white is white regardless of the resolution. If one player had a colored stripe on his shirt or shorts, then you could tell the difference between the two. And the shoes are too small to tell the difference in brand between one all white shoe and another all white shoe. I don't care what kind of TV you have, from that angle, you can't tell what brand of shoe a player is wearing.
     
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  30. Al Czervik

    Al Czervik Professional

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    It's a shame. This was iconic stuff.

    [​IMG]
     
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  31. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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    Does it really? Now that's pretty revealing.
     
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  32. bjsnider

    bjsnider Professional

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    It will be nice when 4k is a reality, but that ain't happening soon because content cannot currently be delivered at that resolution due to lack of spectrum and hardware limitations on set-top boxes. Most computers cannot drive a monitor to that res yet.
     
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  33. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Yes, it reveals that my eyes are normal.

    For comparison, here's non-HD:

    [​IMG]
     
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  34. porchdoor

    porchdoor Rookie

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    The previous image is clearer than this one, yes, but I'm not sure it's high definition. There's a certain threshold in resolution that needs to be reached in order to be considered high definition, I believe (though I am no expert on this).
     
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  35. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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    So to you one of these is HD and the other is SD?

    You really are missing out on the HD experience. Buy an HD TV and upgrade your cable to HD, trust me you'll love it.
     
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  36. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    I have a HD TV and pay the extra $10 a month to my cable company for the HD feed. If you don't believe the first pic is HD, why don't you post a pic showing the entire court from up above that is HD?

    From that angle, I doubt you can tell the brand of an all white shoe no matter how good your HD TV is. It's just too small. If they show a close-up of their shoes or feet then of course you can see, but not when they show them playing a point from the above court angle.
     
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  37. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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    [​IMG]

    Djokovic near court clearly wearing Adidas, and this is from my tablet on youtube so it's downsampled, the Tv feed is much better.

    I think the cable company is pulling a fast one on you.
     
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  38. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Ha ha ha. That picture looks like bad SD to me, and is taken from a lower angle. The HD picture on my TV is much sharper than that, and so is the first pic I posted.

    You can tell Djokovic's shoes because of the 3 black stripes, but what if they were white stripes? Tell me, JUST FROM THIS PIC, can you tell the brand of shoes the guy on the other side of the net is wearing?

    And how about from even a close-up HD pic of this guy? Can you tell the brand of shoes?

    [​IMG]
     
    #38
  39. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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    If you think this is HD while the one I posted is SD means there can only be one conclusion:

    [​IMG]

    You should upgrade your computer too lol
     
    #39
  40. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    I think it is too white.

    Maybe say 98% white and let the designer have 2% to play with. This would exclude Serena's red underwear because that's way way more than 2% but allow Robredo's green trim on his polo shirt.
     
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  41. bigdaddyps

    bigdaddyps Rookie

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    Those stodgy uptight old British farts need to go away and let a younger generation take over.

    ALL WHITE? Really? Are they running an Asylum?

    Let the players express themselves. Individuality is great
    in a democratic society. This is the 21st century boys.

    Enough already.
     
    #41
  42. QuadCam

    QuadCam Rookie

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    adjust your contrast, whiteness, and black levels of your TV. Too may HD sets come with the levels that totally blowout the whites. somehow, tv manufactures think that blown out whites and super high contrast are natural. Ha. :confused:
     
    #42
  43. JW10S

    JW10S Hall of Fame

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    Every major sport, at least in the US, has their 'throw back' games where the teams wear uniforms from their pasts to acknowledge those who laid the foundations for those particular sports. For the whiners, who apparently have nothing better to do, just think of Wimbledon as tennis' 1 'throw back' event where homage is paid to the past traditions of the sport. The players can wear colors during the 100s of other of events on the calendar the rest of the year, it really is not a big deal. If the worst thing you had to deal with was having to watch tennis players wearing white, and this caused you major upset, you live a charmed life--some people have real problems to deal with. Ranting about it makes you look foolish, and yes, infantile. And BTW, Wimbledon is over, move on and get over it already...

    And btw, if 2 players are wearing kits from the same company, in the same colors (which does happen), how can you tell them apart when you can't tell who's who when they are wearing white kits from 2 different companies? Hhhmmm?
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2014
    #43

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