Mediocrity

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by r2473, Mar 25, 2014.

  1. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    I'm as guilty as anyone of what Coach Sommers is ranting about. With his stuff in particular, certain progressions are pretty hard, so I find myself spending more time with the stuff I know I can do and avoiding the stuff I'm having trouble with.

    How about you? Do you have a training plan (be it for tennis or anything)? Is it well thought out and progressive or just a random collection of "internet wisdom"? How good are you at sticking with your plan? How far have you progressed along the path to your goals?

    https://www.facebook.com/GymnasticB...5172437173130/788399497850419/?type=1&theater

    It continually astounds me how many people consciously choose mediocrity. They claim that they are seeking excellence, but they won’t follow proper progressions. They don’t want to train hard. They refuse to follow the advice of experts. They whine about being bored.

    The mediocre insist on freedom from structure and stress. They float about like a butterfly, sampling a little of this and a little of that. God forbid that a trickle of sweat might mar their placid, content faces. They need to be tickled and entertained. They need constant validation; someone eternally whispering in their ear ... you are special ... you are unique. They wallow in a sea of unearned self esteem.

    And then one day they realize that all of their training has been a sham. Really nothing more than a glorified edition of adult t-ball where everyone always wins; when in reality no one has.

    And they moan about how ‘hard’ they have worked with nothing to show for it.

    Get a grip, people. Strength does not work that way. You must earn what you get. If you want to get strong, pay the price. Stop prancing about on the sidelines and buckle down. The knowledge is here; use it.

    More sweat. More sacrifice. Less ********.

    End of rant.

    Coach Sommer

    [​IMG]
     
    #1
  2. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    Always remember the words of Senator Roman Hruska (R-Nebraska) in 1970 when he rose in the Senate to speak in defense of Judge Harold Carswell, nominated by Richard Nixon to a seat on the Supreme Court. Judge Carswell had been criticized as a "mediocre" jurist not worthy of a seat on the court. Senator Hruska responded that "there are a lot mediocre judges and people" in this country and "they deserve a little representation too, don't they."
     
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  3. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    I'm usually pretty good about having one shot or other to be working on at any one time. Helps with overall focus, etc.
     
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  4. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I liken his reference to "mediocrity" as something akin to the "good life".
    Try a bunch of stuff, unlimited time and money, and go on to something else.
    Why WORK at one thing, when another might attract your interests.
    See something you might like, give it a try! Give it a year, or 5, whatever, until you get bored.
    Life can be good, or it can be work. Your choice.
     
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  5. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    I do the random wisdom thing. :) It's not that I don't know the value of a proper training, but there are a couple thoughts that get in the way. 1. In a subtle way I (we all) believe that I am more talented than the next guy and I just need to do enough or only as much as he does, then that's enough to beat him. It's ridiculous that I have to spend way more time and money to win this. 2. No time and money to afford this kind of training :)
     
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  6. Legend of Borg

    Legend of Borg Legend

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    I don't consider tennis a big goal nowadays.

    It's small fish compared to mental health.

    Also, I don't know who this coach is but he sounds like a d1ck.
     
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  7. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    I'm better than mediocre but not as good at reaching my tennis goals as I'd like.

    I was tracking my progress and doing logical things to get better: practicing more often, finding good hitting partners, using video to improve my form, setting qualitative and quantitative training goals. And then I got injured and things went out the window. One good injury means a major setback. Now I spend more time doing rehab than outright training.

    Now I'm thinking about just tossing out my training plans and following sureshs's "secrets.":twisted:
     
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  8. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    If you really want something, it makes sense to work hard for it.

    But it doesn't make much sense to work hard over trivial things. He's a coach? Sports is all one big zero sum game, for every winning team, there is a losing team. Sports, even Wimbledon or the Super Bowl are only entertainments. I wonder if the coach has his priorities right?
     
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  9. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Age old question, master of ONE, or jack of all trades?
    In life, the practical side, it's usually considered a jack of all can trump a master of ONE subject, because the jack can do it all, bring crossover to the equation, and never feel stumped by any equation.
    The master of ONE subject is the king of his trade, but knows little about anything else, therefore constantly flummoxed by life's easiest questions.
    Life is not all about ONE thing.
     
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  10. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Most people are mediocre.
     
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  11. jhhachamp

    jhhachamp Hall of Fame

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    True, but in modern times, if you are the master of one thing, and that one thing happens to be a popular sport, acting, performing, etc...you will make a heck of a lot more money than someone who is well rounded but not great at anything.
     
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  12. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Is money the end all?
    Would freedom and independence play a role?
    Most specialists need lots of money to pay for help in areas they don't know.
    McGiver can make do just fine.
     
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  13. goober

    goober Legend

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    Adult club tennis player are not training for excellence except for a very small minority. The goal is not to be a 5.5 level player. It is mostly some combination of exercise, social and competition. It's recreation. You have to pick and choose what you want strive for excellence in. Everybody, including the OP, is mediocre at lot of things they do in their life.
     
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  14. Spin Doctor

    Spin Doctor Professional

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    The problem I find with fitness trainers, instructors, coaches etc. is that they seem to have no concept of people having, you know, a life.

    I've had trainers tell me to do weights 3x week, core 3x week, plus stretching and cardio. How the hell am I supposed to do all that AND fit in the sports I play? Then I have tennis instructors telling me I need to play tennis 5x a week to see the improvement I want (which means giving up all my other sports, which I don't want to do). And how do I fit in gym time if I'm playing 5x a week while holding down a job? They seem to have no concept of the fact that people have other hobbies, demanding jobs, social lives, rest, errands to run. etc. etc.
     
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  15. shindemac

    shindemac Hall of Fame

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    It's about setting goals and improving. If I'm in the gym and my bench doesn't go up, then I need to reassess why I am in the gym and putting in all these hours. Maybe my workout routine or diet needs to be adjusted. Same w tennis or anything else in life.
     
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  16. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    For the adult player its all about bang for the buck - not maximizing excellence. What works give you the most results for the shortest amount of time. What kind of practice can keep your tennis game sharp and help you make progress etc etc.

    I think the reverse is a more significant problem - not doing anything because you don't feel you can be excellent. People who don't pursue any hobbies because they don't feel they can be the best.
     
    #16
  17. sovertennis

    sovertennis Semi-Pro

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    Staying fit is, to me, very important, to I do quite a lot of aerobic activities, and try to stay flexible via yoga. But I'd remind Coach Sommers that we're "playing" tennis, we're not "working" tennis.
     
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  18. maggmaster

    maggmaster Hall of Fame

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    My goals are extravagant so my training must be as well. If your goals are more modest then you don't have to train as hard.
     
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  19. tennytive

    tennytive Semi-Pro

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    Even at mediocrity I'm just mediocre. :?
     
    #19
  20. maleyoyo

    maleyoyo Rookie

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    In my goal setting journal dated 2004, I wrote my goal in tennis was to one day come back and beat those arrogant tennis players at a local tennis park I used to go to who made me look silly every time I played them. I still remember their comments and attitude when I played doubles with them.
    I moved out of the neighborhood years ago, and I returned to the park last summer to play every week for a month. I beat all of them in singles except 2 guys but it was very close. I did make most of them look silly this time.

    My original goal was 3 years, but it actually took 9 years.

    Life is good.
     
    #20
  21. USS Tang

    USS Tang Rookie

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    If you like doing something, do it, then do it again;
    If you're good at it, try to get better:
    If you improve, compete against the best in your chosen field;
    If you win, don't take yourself too seriously (there will always be someone better);
    If you lose, drink a beer and be content with yourself, knowing that you gave it your best.
     
    #21
  22. Kobble

    Kobble Hall of Fame

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    Cockroach Sommers

    I can't stand him, and, yes, I know well who he is. He is a salesman in a pretty obnoxious way. I believe in bodyweight training, and I am getting back on the ball again. Sommer is very cocky for showing next to minimal knowledge about strength and conditioning. A lot of people also have been plateauing in the planche on his 60 second system and he didn't really have any answers. I am not sure what he preaches now.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTwTYKUhC3E

    One of my things I read about training planche was from some person who talked with some Russian/European gymnasts. They said they would go to the end of a pool, and kick up in a straddle planche and fall in...over and over again. Until, one day you didn't fall in.

    Universal volume recommendations are ********. I have some bodyparts I make progress on 40 total reps for 130 seconds of TUT. Other bodyparts, I can't make any progress using less than 80 reps at over 200 seconds TUT. Truthfully, I am sick of having to bust my *** using 80+ reps to make any progress, but that is the way it is, for now.
     
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  23. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

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    I might be mediocre... but my mediocre is still f**king awesome :D
     
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  24. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    Just kick up into a straddle planche, huh? Sounds easy.
     
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  25. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    Sounds easy to me.

    What's a straddle planche?
     
    #25
  26. LakeSnake

    LakeSnake Semi-Pro

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    I think Sommers had a planche progression on his website, I think? I never got past the frog thing!
     
    #26
  27. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    The planche is a circus move that people talk about incessantly on the internet, but nobody comes within a million miles of actually doing anything that even resembles one in real life.
     
    #27
  28. maggmaster

    maggmaster Hall of Fame

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    It takes a lean, hard, trained person to do a planche even just for a few seconds.
     
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  29. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    The OP is much ado about nothing. You can't comment on how well one has met a goal without knowing what the goal is.
     
    #29
  30. Kevin T

    Kevin T Professional

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    I can hold a planche for over 3 minutes, no problem...wait, I thought planche was a fancy/French spelling for plank. Never mind. :)
     
    #30
  31. Power Player

    Power Player G.O.A.T.

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    It sounded like a warm meal, and I was going to suggest that I could make one if I had the proper youtube instruction.
     
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