"modern" version of wooden rackets?

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by Figjam, Apr 11, 2010.

  1. Figjam

    Figjam Banned

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    Hey guys im looking for a small head racket similar to the old wooden ones, but for the more modern playing style. IE not over 13oz preferably graphite. but small head, 80 or smaller. and a yoke not a mono beam.

    any sugestions?
     
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  2. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Modern rackets play nothing like wood rackets.
    Your best bet is to get a old school graphite in good condition, they have the power to complete with todays rackets and more heft and flex like the wood rackets. If you must use a model sold in the stores today then I would suggest a racket like one of the head youtek models, they have nice feel and are some of the more flexible modern rackets made for top players.
     
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  3. pshulam

    pshulam Hall of Fame

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    Head Graphite Edge ~80 sq in
     
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  4. Enlightened Coelacanth

    Enlightened Coelacanth Rookie

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    Dunlop Max 200 G as used by McEnroe after his switch from wood.
    It's as close as you'll get.
     
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  5. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    +1 ten char
     
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  6. kalic

    kalic Professional

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    Rossignol F200, IMO
     
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  7. Tennis Man

    Tennis Man Hall of Fame

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    Head Graphite Edge
    Head TX Edge
    Head Flash Edge

    Wilson Ultra Graphite PWS
    Wilson Ultra I
    Wilson Ultra II

    check my threads ;)
     
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  8. SirSweetSpot

    SirSweetSpot Banned

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    PK Copper Ace
     
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  9. Dream_On

    Dream_On Rookie

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    Wilson PS 85

    God knows haha
     
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  10. Don't Let It Bounce

    Don't Let It Bounce Hall of Fame

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    Yep, this has always been for me the benchmark of "wood racquets made from graphite".
     
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  11. FedererClone

    FedererClone Semi-Pro

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    also the Head TXE - 81 sq in
     
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  12. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

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    yep.. :) see my signature.
    It is similar to the max 200g, but you can buy these for $10-20.. not ~$150 like the 200g.

    The copper ace is around 11.8-12.2 oz. so, it is well below the OP's 13 oz limit. but the head size is 90 sq in (not 80) and flex is ~50. It holds its own against the following modern racquets that I own:
    wilson K95 (18x20) team - flex 59
    babolat Pure storm GT ltd - flex 59
    Volkl PB10 - flex 59

    I use the copper ace more than the 3 racquets listed above. Volkl PB10 is my 2nd choice.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2010
    #12
  13. PrinceMoron

    PrinceMoron Hall of Fame

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    Babolat PDGTR

    No really - it is so different to a wooden racket that you have no motor memory interference, nothing to confuse you brain. It is like playing a completely different game. Anything else you are just going to be thinking yeah this prestige tour is quite flexy but still not like my wooden racket, oh this PS85 has tons of control but still feels stiff....

    If you really want a wooden racket, why not just get one... Head Vilas or a clone is always a good choice. Loads of Prince Woodies around still.
     
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  14. schu47

    schu47 Rookie

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    Have you considered trying a wood composite? They were the racquets in the late 70s-early 80s that started to incorporate layers of graphite, boron, fiberglass or other materials among the wood laminations. The composites were a step up from wood in frame strength, playability and power, but still had the feel of a wood racquet.

    The Pro Kennex Golden Ace is a good one, as are the Snauwaert La Grande and the Head Vilas. In fact, a number of manufacturers had wood composite models.

    They're pretty easy to find online and not terribly expensive, and they really do bridge the gap between the old woods and first graphites.

    I don't think you'll find a graphite racquet that plays like wood -- even the earliest graphites have a completely different feel, IMO.
     
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  15. Polaris

    Polaris Hall of Fame

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    PK Copper Ace and Head Graphite Edge are both wonderful racquets. I've played with both, and enjoyed both.

    Head Graphite Edge is the best racquet I've played with so far, and if it wasn't for the fact that I need to cut grommet strips to custom sizes in order to replace the old ones, I would never play with newer racquets.
     
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  16. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Excellent advice and spot on.

    The durafiber rackets may have been the most flexible rackets ever, they are not easy to find. Take a look:

    http://woodtennis.com/durafiber/duraFibers1.jpg
     
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  17. Autodidactic player

    Autodidactic player Semi-Pro

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    Head Vilas.

    [​IMG]
     
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  18. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    The head vilas was actually even smaller than the starndard woody, probably about 60sq". It is quite a challenging racket to play with but powerful if you have the stroking accuracy to consistently hit the dime size sweet spot.

    Most modern players would have a much better chance playing with the later midsize open throat wood rackets.
     
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  19. Autodidactic player

    Autodidactic player Semi-Pro

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    Actually 68 square inches
    . It's really quite entertaining to play with this racket. I can't hit much spin with it, nor generate much power, and since I'm WAY slower than I was when this racket was new, I'm really left fumbling around for a way to win points. OK, maybe I should say frustrating instead of entertaining! :)
     
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  20. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    How about an Adidas Ivan Lendl if you can find one somewhere out there. I can't find mine but I remember while I used to play with it it had a wooden racquet like quality to it. Someone also told me that it's kind of like a wooden racquet in feel and flex. Maybe on par to the Dunlop McEnroe that was already mentioned here.

    I like that wooden Head racquet that Auto posted. I like woods that are split shaft like a modern racquet. I have a wood made in Japan, circa 1982 probably that is like that. I forget the brand off hand. Oh yeah called Skyline.

    I'm almost positive about 10 years ago Wilson came out with some commemorative racquet that was of wood but shaped modern like that Head that was posted. I think they went for about $100. I can't find any info on them or any used ones anywhere. Maybe someone can shine some light on this racquet. Wish I had bought one back then. Oh it cane in a box with a clear plastic window so you can read it and see it.
     
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  21. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    On YouTube there is this young girl playing using a Lendl. She's a pretty good shot and the tone of the Lendl sounds very cool. Check it out.
     
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  22. Don't Let It Bounce

    Don't Let It Bounce Hall of Fame

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    I remember the one I think you're talking about, The Jack Kramer Millenium Edition, mainly because with the limited production run Wilson wouldn't give them to the teaching pros on the advisory staff! (A colleague asked the Wilson rep, and while I don't remember the precise answer, I do remember that the answer included an audible chuckle.) They were way more than $100, though, if that's the same racquet you're remembering. They were basically 95 sq" hypercarbon Pro Staff 6.5's (don't know if it was the same mold as the 6.5, though), 21 mm beam, and the cosmetics of both racquet and case were like the Jack Kramer Autograph wood racquet. It wouldn't play like a wood, of course, but it was certainly as pretty as one. There is a pair of them on The Bay now (item 250642100646), with the starting bid set at a paltry $375!
     
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  23. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    The Adidas Lendl GTX Pro was anything but wood-like in its feel. When it was introduced, it was one of the stiffest racquets yet made. The only thing about it that might be remotely wood-racquet like is the longer, octagonal shaft; however, its mould-mate, the Kneissl White Star Pro Masters (and White Star Pro, White Star Lendl Pro, and Masters 10) featured this, as well as the rest of the concurrent Kneissl composite line-up, and many of the Fischer composite frames of the era (commencing with the Superform).

    I played with the Adidas Lendl GTX for the better part of 1985, and it was a very stiff frame; very un-wood-like, and very much the antithesis of the mentioned Dunlop ("McEnroe") Max 200g.
     
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  24. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    Bounce, exactly that is the one I was thinking about. All this time I thought it was wooden but it was not, just looked like it. Yeah it must have been way more than 100 dollars but for some reason I was thinking it was. That was a great looking racquet. I think that Dunlop recently made one that looked like wood but was not, not sure the model. Split shaft to look modern but still looked kinda wooden.
     
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  25. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    retro, it's been awhile since I played the Lendl so maybe I forgot that it was not like wood. I thought it was stiff in the throat and flexible in the head which kinda gave it a wooden feel to me. But maybe my memory is wrong.
     
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  26. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    I am borrowing a Volkl Power Bridge 10 Light right now. I normally play my Jim Courier Wilson but thought I'd try different racquets. I tried a bunch now and so far the Power Bridge 10 Light is the best of the bunch. It's not very stiff. It's light. If I recall wood racquets are not light but they are flexible. This Power Bridge is amazing. I was making shots like I never did before. I do have a pretty good 1 handed backhand. My forehand is pretty good too. But with this racquet things just got way better. The serve was okay. I have to get used to this. But may I suggest that the person who wants a modern version of a wood racquet to demo the Power Bridge 10 Plus
     
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  27. WilsonPlayer101

    WilsonPlayer101 Professional

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    Even my form improved by just by the use of this racquet. I could not believe it but it's true. I beat my friend 6 - 0. Usually we are pretty even. I am a decent but not great player but this racquet upped me a notch in skill on the court.
     
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  28. mrw

    mrw Semi-Pro

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    Head Graphite Edge

    THE BEST RACQUET EVER MADE.

    IF grommets were available, I would use it exclusively
     
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  29. Centered

    Centered Hall of Fame

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    Your best bet is to use natural gut in a heavy flexible graphite racquet that has a small face. Wooden racquets are rather soft and springy. Gut string is the softest and most elastic string. Gut string will help to make the racquet feel a bit softer and more elastic.
     
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  30. tennis005

    tennis005 Professional

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    Try the Pro Kennex Redondo. Small face, flexible, and heavy.
     
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  31. ChocoLab

    ChocoLab New User

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    Agree with these. Unlike many graphite rackets, even back then, these were very flexible and had that characteristic dead feel when you missed near the top of the frame.
     
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