Modern vs. Classic

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Shroud, May 9, 2013.

  1. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Try this, more SW and slightly more stiff than the Dunlop:

    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Gamma_RZR_98_T/descpageRCGAMMA-GR98T.html

    You don't have to buy them. You can first demo them.
     
    #51
  2. Shroud

    Shroud Hall of Fame

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    I really cant demo them.

    First off the string will be ALL wrong. The tension will be ALL wrong, the grip will be all wrong, the weight will be all wrong, the balance will be all wrong....

    Maybe I am wrong here but I am betting TW wont like me messing up their demo rackets with my mods!??

    So right now I am buying cheap and giving to friends when they suck.

    It was interesting. I thought that the weight and balance if kept identical, along with similar string and tension would minimize differences, but right now it seems that rackets really are different even with the same balance and weight.
     
    #52
  3. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Flex................
     
    #53
  4. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    And weight distribution, torsional rigidity, where and how it flexes, and the differences in feel that come from different compositions, materials, layups, beam shape, beam width, head shape, head size, throat design, handle technologies, etc.
     
    #54
  5. GoudX

    GoudX Professional

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    First things first, lose the Kevlar! That is the most outdated part of your set up, Polyester strings are the much improved modern replacement. They offer more spin than any other string, they have a similar low power to Kevlar, they don't break as easily as gut/multi strings, and they won't give you tennis elbow as easily as Kevlar.

    In fact the POG mid, with Polyester strings, and no lead, might be all you need to try.

    If you still want to change racquet, I suggest you take the racquet question to the racquet forum, to get a bit more insight. Here are some suggestions to get started with. They are all about 12oz, have open string patterns and are ideal for a modern game, but with an 'old school' feel:

    • Head Prestige Pro (open string pattern, classic feel, may be too stiff)
    • Head Prestige MP (closed string pattern, actually 95sqin, very spin friendly, flexible)
    • Babolat Pure Storm Tour (muted babolat feel, Sampras changed to this one from his ProStaff, lower spin potential than the above)
    • Wilson 6.1 95 16x18 (Fairly stiff, high SW and weight, hits bombs from the baseline if you can get good swing speed, only try with a soft string as it can be an arm killer, my arm was fine but if you try it with Kevlar at high tension your arm might explode)
    • Wilson ProStaff 95 (Open string pattern, flexible old school feel, will need lead)

    Also, if you are changing your game and shots to a modern baseline game, it might be a good idea to try a slightly more modern baseline style racquet.

    • Prince EXO3 Tour 100 is the just about the best racquet for preventing tennis elbow, and from what I have heard it has similar spin to the POG.
    • Prince Warrior, essentially a slightly lower powered, arm friendly version of the Pure Drive.
    • Haven't tried the Head IG Radical Pro, but I have heard great things about this as a baseline racquet with controllable power. Fairly flexible.
     
    #55
  6. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Shroud, before you go ahead and buy the Razr 98, think about this: it has a flex of 62. "Modern" rackets have a flex of 65 or greater. You did not like the 60 RA of the D200 Tour, the Razr is just 2 points more. Search for it in the rackets section to find discussions about it before putting money into it believing me, as the Tour did not work out for you.

    The racket with the best torsional rigidity which BP refers to and which is what I suspect you want is the KPS 88. The property is called twistweight in TWU parlance. This racket seems to be discontinued. The other one which never ever gives is the PS 85, which is obsolete for today's game.

    If you are really picky, you may want to spend more money and have Bosworth or Angell custom-build one for you.
     
    #56
  7. Shroud

    Shroud Hall of Fame

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    Interesting post goudx.

    THe Kevlar did give me te. Been playing kevlar for years but put it at the max range with gut at 63/65 and played alot. That did it. My racket at 61/63 didnt hurt me, but the other one did and well I was using it because I hit better with the higher tension.

    I DID try poly. I had the pog strung with lexilon alu power ruff and some technifibre nx or ng 17 cant quite remember. UGH. that was awful. It was really really springy. I hit for a few hours with it and man I couldnt get it to work. Some shots were great but it was springing on most shots but not all. Very hard to be consistent.

    Maybe that is just a bad combo. What do you recommend? doesnt poly lose tension anyhow?

    Now I am sold on the kevlar but not at 63 like I had it, but at 28lbs. It gives the board feeling but with some softness and comfort. Arm is great with the lower tension.

    I am skeptical about oversize rackets. I cant say that I have had great results. The Prince white was 98 I think and man there wasnt much control.
     
    #57
  8. GoudX

    GoudX Professional

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    Can't say I'm a string expert, I have always enjoyed using Babolat Pro Hurricane in a hybrid with Prince synthetic gut at 55lbs. It is a bit of a cliche, but I always end up coming back to it as it has good spin and durability, and a full bed of a stiffer polyester gives me TE.

    Poly will die, but a Poly Hybrid with a Synthetic/multi will last quite a while, but you appeared to have an issue with this set up. Maybe try asking the string forum for a less lively poly suggestion, but if the TE has cleared up it might be worth keeping to your current set up.

    In terms of racquets, if you don't like 'tweeners' (powerful 100" racquets like the White and Pure Drive), the best control baseline/all court racquet I have ever used is the IG Prestige MP (which is why I am using it as my racquet), but that isn't the newest racquet design anyway.

    By the way, it may be worth demoing groups of potential racquets, just to see if the feel and *ping* sound is within your acceptance.
     
    #58
  9. PimpMyGame

    PimpMyGame Hall of Fame

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    My only advice is to spend money on a good coach before spending on equipment. The coach will be able to recommend rackets, strings, grip size etc once he has assessed your game and you are both clear on which paths to take to get to your goal.

    There are lots of lovely, shiny new rackets out there and I like many others on these boards have spend a lot of money in the past chasing equipment.

    There are a lot of us who eventually settle for something we are comfortable with, which ultimately is quite close to where we started. Like sureshs, my weapon of choice is a Dunlop 200Tour and I have both the 4D and Bio versions. If those were taken away tomorrow I would default to a 6.1 PSC. I love the thought of a new, lighter, more even balanced racket to play a modern game but whenever I pick one up I realise that they don't suit the way I play.
     
    #59
  10. GoudX

    GoudX Professional

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    While you shouldn't get trapped in the mindset of 'this racquet will solve this problem with my game', having a racquet that makes you want to play often is helpful; and using a racquet which feels well suited to your game is important because so much of tennis is mental. The way the racquet 'feels', and the differences in the shot produced, will change your perception of the game and change the way you play. Finding a racquet that makes you want to play regularly, and which encourages you to play your best tennis, can help a lot.

    For instance, I eventually settled on the Prestige MP, because it has a number of properties I like: it is a low power racquet, with a low swingweight and high static weight. While I can play similar shots with other racquets, very few other racquets encourage me to swing as confidently at the ball, as it *feels* like the low power, decent topspin potential (low swingweight) and good stability (static weight), will allow me to take a full swing consistently. The power of confidence should not be underestimated in Tennis.

    Other players gain confidence from a racquet like a Pure Drive, as they know that they can rely on the power and topspin to grind down an opponent, or maybe a Prostaff 85 leaded up to 18oz, because they know that their accurate serves will zip straight past their opponent.
     
    #60
  11. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    what about that Wilson Steam S... spin racket? Have not
    heard much since that exciting introduction.
     
    #61
  12. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    #62
  13. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    thanks for the link.

    Seems to have some very nice reviews, but I'm just not hearing much about it
    other than a thread like that. Not seeing it recommended that much really.
    Maybe not listening to the right people??
     
    #63
  14. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    #64
  15. GoudX

    GoudX Professional

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    Yet to see the Steam 99s on a court. Maybe next year, once the word has spread a bit.

    Had a hit with it against a rebound wall and it seemed surprisingly unremarkable. That said, I couldn't take full swings, and it is quite different from my racquet a modified 360g, 310SW, 9pts headlight Prestige MP.
     
    #65
  16. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    I haven't seen anyone with a Steam 99S either.

    I checked two other sites. One gives a 5 star and another a 4.5 star rating from the reviews.
     
    #66
  17. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    Sounds like a great stick...

    Thanks Goudx
     
    #67
  18. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    It is way overrated, gives a lot of spin but way to much power and eats through strings faster than any racket I have used. Even if the string doesn't break it loses tension way to fast. I consider it a granny stick, just to much power. The best shot was the back hand slice it can hit wicked slices.
     
    #68
  19. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    I'd sure like to give it a try with my poly.
     
    #69
  20. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    It was way too light for me.
     
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  21. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    I would add some 10 & 2 lead tape and adjust from there. :)
     
    #71
  22. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    I am relatively new to lead-tapism. Slowly getting into it.
     
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  23. Shroud

    Shroud Hall of Fame

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    Lead tape done right can transform a racket

    Though I don't use it myself. But adding weight is a good thing for most frames

    Just be sure to maintain the right balance
     
    #73
  24. mr_fro2000

    mr_fro2000 Rookie

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    Your situation sounds very similar to me... I was away from the game for 10-15 years, and was probably around 4.0-5.0 at the time (although not sure). This was in high school.

    So got back into playing a year ago and came here and saw a ton of posts about “the modern game.” After reading many comments, I basically concluded that I was pretty much hitting modern (or close to it) my entire life.

    If you are hitting semi-western to western grip forehands, are you sure you’re also not already hitting modern forehands? If you’re not, I can’t imagine that you’re that far off.

    To address some of your other points, do you feel you really need to go ‘modern’ at all? If you are looking to play for recreation and pick up where you left off, maybe you stick to your original strokes. I know some old dudes that absolutely kill it w/ their old-school classic game.

    Racquet wise, I used to use a prostaff classic 4.2 si (the stiff version of the prostaff classic). Recently transitioned to a donnay pro one 97 which I absolutely love. Its light but swings heavy and has a great, ‘dense’ feel. Is also a few points headlight. Highly recommend it.

    Good luck!
     
    #74

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