Moving from eastern to SW/FW

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by kidwithshirt, Aug 24, 2007.

  1. kidwithshirt

    kidwithshirt New User

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    After playing for 3 month, i finally decided that it's time to develop some solid topspin on my hits

    After some research, topspin is mostly generated by the windshield wiper motion

    I played around a bit my forehand, twisted my grip a bit, and i just keep slamming the ball to the ground

    maybe my set-up wasn't right. At least the wrist position and elbow position is different from eastern, i assume

    If any of you pros have been through this process, why not share some tips
     
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  2. lkdog

    lkdog Rookie

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    You have to hit the ball further in front of you, and your stance should open up to allow you to get through the shot and follow through on your left side with racquet above shoulder or even below shoulder pointed down.
    Will take some time to get used to.

    Check out the hi-tech tennis site.

    http://www.hi-techtennis.com/
     
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  3. kidwithshirt

    kidwithshirt New User

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    yo ikdog, i signed up with hitech last month and my account expired, no more cash left in my paypal and parents wont pay >.<

    Anyway, how far should i bend my double-bend?

    Somehow the contact surface isnt there when i need it, so the ball always go down
     
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  4. lkdog

    lkdog Rookie

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    Try this site. It is free.

    http://www.procomparetennis.net/index2.asp


    As far as how far to bend your double bend-experiment a bit.
    A big key is holding the double bend through the hit. Don't wrist the stroke and don't let the racquet's head get ahead of your wrist until the follow through.
    Check your follow through. Many people like to finish along your left side and below you left shoulder.

    Aim higher over the net (like 3-5 feet) until you get a sense that you can start controlling height and depth and pace by how much spin you are imparting.

    This is a different swing pattern than the more straight arm forehand like Nadal.
     
    #4
  5. kidwithshirt

    kidwithshirt New User

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    I saved a couple pages from Hi-tech

    There's no need for me to keep looking different sites. The modern-forehand is very typical, not much significant variance between players. So i will try to play more instead of watching/reading more stuff

    Btw, what's the word on SW vs. FW? I m sure it's heavily discussed
     
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  6. lkdog

    lkdog Rookie

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    I use a semi western. Can flatten the ball out when needed.
    Never got used to feel of full western and low balls and approach shots are tough. It does put some hellacious spin and weight on the ball when you get it going.

    Good luck.
     
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  7. Hobomagic

    Hobomagic New User

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    May be a little off topic but i dont suggest you switch to Full western. I used to go back and forth between the grips. Full western prevents you from getting enough pace on the ball unless your phenomenal. Semi-Western Grip is has more than enough spin. Too much spin isnt good either.
     
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  8. Vision84

    Vision84 Hall of Fame

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    I just switched to a SW from an Eastern. To fix the problem of hitting them into the net my coach had me practice hitting topspin lobs for a while with it. The other thing that keyed in with me was to swing through the bottom of the ball and not the middle of the ball. It may seem silly but it really worked for me.
     
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  9. lkdog

    lkdog Rookie

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    Not silly at all. The feeling on hitting a heavy ball is that you "catch" the ball and throw/push it over the net.
     
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  10. Sean Dugan

    Sean Dugan Rookie

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    Hard to diagnose without seeing you hit...but if you keep hitting the ball into the ground, the plane of your swing probably isn't adequately upward to compensate for how much more the face of the racquet is closed at impact with a SW or Western grip versus an Eastern grip.

    With a SW, your ideal contact point is a bit higher and more out in front than with an Eastern; even more so for a full Western

    Also make sure you are keeping your head still/down during your stroke and you are not "looking up." Akin to topping the ball in golf; same effect.

    With a SW versus and Eastern make a concerted effort to "hit up" on the ball more and see if that helps. Go for a bit more net clearance to account for the added topsin. I second that for hard court tennis, a full western probably isn't the best move. Try the SW first and see how you make out with it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2007
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  11. Trinity TC

    Trinity TC Semi-Pro

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    You might have to adjust the angle of your racquet face as you are preparing to swing through the hitting zone. Being off by as little as a degree or two will slam the ball into the ground.

    Be patient and don't cut the follow through short in an attempt to initiate the windshield wiper motion. Tell us how it works out.:cool:
     
    #11
  12. paulfreda

    paulfreda Hall of Fame

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    With Full Western it is very difficut to hit it long because the face is so closed. This means you can swing up to your hearts content which will give lots of topspin.
    Take your FW grip and try hitting long by 2-4 feet.
    That should cure your smothering the ball in to the ground.

    One tip; you must suppinate thru the ball to get the face square at contact.
    Suppinate means turning your forearm clockwise.
     
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  13. jasoncho92

    jasoncho92 Professional

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    Just play around with the grips lol. Ive tried all the grips and its pretty fun to put topspin on the ball with continental and stuff. But open your racket more if youre hitting the balls into the ground
     
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  14. kidwithshirt

    kidwithshirt New User

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    I m kind of worried of getting low balls with the western grips

    I know it's very possible but i think my game will suffer a bit (at least until i master the grip)

    I am okay at a forehand slice, so that might help a bit
     
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  15. Wheelz

    Wheelz New User

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    Is it that harder to generate top spin with a Eastern forehand grip ?.... or SW ?
     
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  16. kidwithshirt

    kidwithshirt New User

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    i m switching grips so i can generate top spin

    eastern is good for beginner that hits flat
     
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  17. Wheelz

    Wheelz New User

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    I think it's a bit harsh to say it's for beginners since alot of pros played with Eastern.

    How's your switch ? I also like to hit with a SW since I get more spin (coming for Eastern) and that I more then often hit it too far then short in the net.
     
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  18. burosky

    burosky Professional

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    This SW or FW topic has been going on for a while on different posts in this forum. One thing that a lot of players don't realize is that if you change a component of stroke you may have to change the other components as well. The components I'm referring to is the grip, swing plane, point of contact and follow through. Two that are closely related are the grip and contact point. Change one and you have to change the other.

    The contact point is different for the eastern, SW and FW grips. Using one point of contact for each of these grips will produce different results because the grip changes affect the angle of the racket face at contact. The swing plane and follow-through is not that far behind because it affects the stroke as well.

    This is just a reminder to people here who are looking to make a change in their stroke. It is not just a matter of changing your grip. You also need to learn what you need to change in your swing plane, point of contact and follow-through in order to hit the proper stroke.
     
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  19. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Federer hits very close to eastern and produces more topspin than most players.
     
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  20. hiro11

    hiro11 Guest

    I recently switched to a SW/windshield wiper forehand after attending a tennis camp for a week. The pros were all pushing it there and I figured I'd give it a shot as I've never felt comfortable on the forehand side (I used hit a fairly flat, eastern grip forehand)...

    What a difference. The SW/WW just felt much more natural and relaxed. It also allowed me to, for the first time, generate some fairly nasty topspin.

    It takes a while to get used to the forehand, the key to me was the keep the arm relaxed. I found letting my pinkie drop off the grip helped. I'm almost holding the grip only with my two forefingers and thumb. I also had a lot of trouble with the spin dropping the balls into the net. Opening my racquet face a little by going slightly more eastern on the grip and brushing the racquet up more vertically helped. I still find it difficult to generate much power on short balls or high balls but I'm getting better. You really have to jump with this shot to get over the ball when you're late to a high ball.

    If you get one right in the roundhouse and rip it, the shot feels great to me. Incredibly satisfying. It's weird, I learned to play tennis in the eighties and it goes against everything I learned: you use a flexy elbow, slight wrist snap, wrist rotation, open stance, even weight distribution (maybe even on your back foot) etc. But once I got the hang of it, I love it.
     
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