murray's forehand

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by pushing_wins, Aug 8, 2012.

  1. pushing_wins

    pushing_wins Hall of Fame

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    on the body vs arm swing spectrum, its more body than any other player.
     
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  2. TTMR

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    Not quite. Soderling, Djokovic more so.
     
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  3. pushing_wins

    pushing_wins Hall of Fame

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    this kinda confirms how we all "see" strokes differently and it affects how we learn and play.

    i would say soderling is on the opposite end. he is all arm, thats how i see it.
     
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  4. TTMR

    TTMR Hall of Fame

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    It seems to me that it's an optical illusion generated by his proclivity to put his arm way back, but his power is generated by the huge angle between his shoulders and hips as he begins his body rotation. His is the most "body" groundstroke I've seen, with his arm being very passive in the swing. Of modern players, Nadal I think would be the opposite, where the arm is heavily involved in the swing, but even here his power is mostly generated from the body.

    You're right though. Everyone "sees" strokes differently, which is why we have coaches and "teaching pros" on here constantly providing contradictory quasi-scientific analyses and explanations for idiosyncrasies among professional tennis players.
     
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  5. TennisLovaLova

    TennisLovaLova Hall of Fame

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    Pusher's fh basically
     
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  6. TTMR

    TTMR Hall of Fame

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    Because pushers are known for putting their whole body into the shot starting with the legs through the torso and arms, right?

    I've determined that on this forum, a pusher is someone who either defeats a poster, or defeats the poster's favourite player.
     
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  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    It's already been determined a pusher can only beat up to 4.0. After that, it's counterpuncher or baseline grinder.
     
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  8. TennisLovaLova

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    I was joking.
    Murray is the new goat imo
     
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  9. tank_job

    tank_job Banned

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    Surely the less you use your arm in the forehand (and the more you use your body), the better your forehand is?

    Therefore, since Murray's forehand is known to be weak, he must be arming it.

    What is Federer's forehand? All body?
     
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  10. ace_pace

    ace_pace Rookie

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    Murray's forehand isnt that weak, its just that he doesnt have as much topspin as Fed, Nadal and Djoker :)

    Srsly though, if you think Murrays forehand is good, you should take a look at Federer and Nadal, they use their body effectively. Next time you them, watch their torso and hips. They drag their arm.
     
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  11. rkelley

    rkelley Hall of Fame

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    It's early in the morning for me and I'm confused (common occurrence), but I gotta ask, is this thread serious? Am I missing something?

    Assuming it is, and assuming I'm not, all of these guys, Murray, Solderling, <insert favorite pro>, etc. are all fundamentally using core rotation and the kinetic chain to generate the power. They might step in more or less, or plant the back foot more or less, but the power is from the core and the kinetic chain. No one's arming the ball. It's just not possible given the spin and pace pros (and many others) hit with.
     
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