My Technique in a Better Light

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Topspin Shot, May 7, 2014.

  1. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    #1
  2. aimr75

    aimr75 Hall of Fame

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    Your racquet handle has developed a goitre

    your serves look pretty good.. kind of Cilic like from that distance. FH is much less loopy from the drop feed
     
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  3. Ballinbob

    Ballinbob Hall of Fame

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    Idk if it's the angle but your serve looks scary good haha. Much better lighting on these vids too
     
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  4. Jim Lefty

    Jim Lefty Rookie

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    I dig how much back arch and leg bend you get on your serves!
     
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  5. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    Was that your attempt at 1hbh? Except that everything looks solid. But the grip? You can NOT be serious! Lol
     
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  6. Zouph

    Zouph New User

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    I am also very curious what you did with your grip and with what reasoning. Looks interesting! Like an super ergonomic mouse.
     
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  7. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Video Considerations

    For the serve, try the view with the camera behind the server. Your forehand shows a nice trajectory for the ball as it travels away from the camera. For the serves put the camera high on the fence and see if the ball traveling away shows for the serve too.

    Nothing seems in good focus. Except maybe the camera is focusing on the net ribbon T? Putting you in the center and the net ribbon off to the side might help the auto focus (if central) put you in focus. It might be your camera as you mentioned? But your backhand video seems the best. Why? Check the lens surface and clean if necessary. Shoot in bright sunlight. You can always tell when looking at a video if it was shot in bright sunlight because sharp shadows are cast. If a cloud covers the sun the shadows disappear or become less sharp.

    The motion blur with this lighting is excessive. You can't see the racket approaching the ball (stop around impact).

    Overcast lighting levels vary a lot. Late in day also the lighting drops a lot even in direct sun light. Try bright direct sunlight to see how fast a shutter the camera's automatic exposure control will select, it might help reduce the motion blur a lot.
     
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  8. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    On your backhand video -

    I believe that the initial acceleration for the 1h backhand is the key for a high level backand. I think pro players get that by starting with their upper arm jammed on their chest and turning the upper body.

    Yesterday, on Tennis Channel, Almagro hit a high pace backhand winner down the line. They showed nice camera views after the shot. I used the DVR to stop and view his backand from the view from behind. His upper arm was tight against his chest and his upper body turned a lot. See if you can find a video that shows this part of the backhand.

    When I look at your backhand I see space between your upper arm and chest. Needs more and better videos.

    According to my view, in your case, if you turn your upper body this space will decrease a little and not accelerate your upper arm as I think I'm seeing the upper arm accelerate in the Almagro video. Maybe Almagro's arm is also semi-straight when he starts the upper body turn.

    This issue needs some better videos to see how tight your upper arm is. It also needs some more pro videos to establish that the upper arm is actually tight against the chest and also exactly when during the stroke it is tight.
    Justine Henin. Other camera angles would be better for this issue.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdDwMj3_WMA

    You can also experiment by keeping the upper arm pinned on the chest when you start your 1hbh with upper body rotation.

    Maybe someone who has a high level backhand can comment on this issue or take a video.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
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  9. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Wrist Flexion on the 1hbh and Tennis Elbow Risk

    On your one hand backhand video there might be an issue that could lead to Tennis Elbow.

    If the wrist is held in flexion (hand bent down) the risk of tennis elbow increases. If the wrist is held in extension, as the pros do, the risk of tennis elbow decreases. This is according to references by Knudson. See especially his book discussion, Biomechanical Principles of Tennis Technique, D. Knudson.

    You can look at pictures of pros hitting one hand backhands and see that they do so with extended wrists. Amateurs more often do 1hbh's with their wrists flexed. It is claimed that as a result the occurrence of Tennis Elbow is much higher among amateur tennis players than among pro players.

    Look at the extended wrists in these pro pictures.
    Google: one hand backhand pictures
    https://www.google.com/search?q=one...IHI2zyATbloLIBg&ved=0CCgQsAQ&biw=1321&bih=632

    You have a special racket grip so it may not be the same. But probably the forces before and at impact and the degree of wrist flexion are the most important things.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2014
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  10. Fxanimator1

    Fxanimator1 Semi-Pro

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    1. For your one handed backhand, on your take back I would not have the racquet face as open.
    2. On the follow through open up your chest more.

    From looking at your "grip" I can't really see because of you bulbous handle, but try and turn it over more. as in knuckles on the top bevel. I think that will fix number 1. Try to get more of your hand behind your handle in other words.

    This is a video me hitting a one handed back hand, but I'm sure a video of Dimitrov would be a better example.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEaXm4ZdJV4&feature=youtu.be
     
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  11. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    What do you think of the issue of the upper arm and how it presses against the chest? Your arm appears to be pressing on the chest as you start your forward swing. It's done in a very smooth way.

    For the initial acceleration some players might have picked up which muscles to use naturally with feel but others/most use other muscles. ?

    If the mind set is to use the weaker shoulder muscles instead of body turn for the initial acceleration that might prevent some players from getting a higher level backhand.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
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  12. Fxanimator1

    Fxanimator1 Semi-Pro

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    You are correct my upper arm is tight against my right chest muscle, but any power comes from my legs and hips and torso. You can tell that my weight has fully transitioned to my front foot for power, and the follow through is nothing more than me NOT trying to stop or slow my swing after contact. But I'm still and always will be tweaking things for better results.
    I am not sure if racquet weight and balance play a part in this issue but, I use a Pro Staff 90 BLX, I've been using Pro Staff 85's, and 90's since '92, so maybe I am just used to that feel.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
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  13. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Agree on your sources of 'power'*, the bigger, stronger and slower muscles are the sources of power. Most of that power goes elsewhere but a portion can be transmitted into the arm and racket.

    The shoulder transmits more of that power to accelerate the arm and racket effectively if it is tight against the chest. But if it is not tight the transmission is not as good. That is how it looks to me.

    I have experimented recently and have begun to study high speed videos of pro players and believe that an important part of the 1hbh is to have the upper arm tight against the chest.



    * "Power'. For tennis strokes, I understand and can measure velocities much easier than 'power', which I can't understand well or measure.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
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  14. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    For the high level backhands the players have more shoulder turn and according to Justine Henin 'look over their shoulder' at the incoming ball.

    You might compare your shoulder turn on videos of your heaviest paced backhands to those of the pros.

    (I have a hard time 'looking over my shoulder' as much as Justine Henin does.)
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
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  15. Fxanimator1

    Fxanimator1 Semi-Pro

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    Maybe I can explain the "feeling" better. I perform my back swing by turning my core and racquet arm around toward the back. The tight arm against the chest feeling, is not because I'm squashing my arm against my chest, but because I've started uncoiling my core and my arm happens to be in the way and lagging behind...which results in my racquet arm sling-shotting into contact. I don't know all the technical wording, but that is the feeling of what torque feels like to me.
     
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  16. Fxanimator1

    Fxanimator1 Semi-Pro

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    I left my mid-twenties many, many years ago. That type of flexibility is not as easy to come by as it once was...
     
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  17. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Did you come by that part of your stroke naturally and self-taught or by instruction? Did you do another sport first that may have had a similar motion. Which sport? Baseball?

    When things 'lag behind' it probably means some muscles are being stretched because the mass of a body part and racket have to be accelerated. Your sling-shot analogy - It's like tying a rubber band on an object with mass and pulling it fast. At first, the object accelerates slowly but after a lag time the object gets moving. If you don't pull fast enough on the rubber band the object flies by at a higher velocity.

    Maybe you stretch some shoulder and arm muscles and they give the higher velocities later in the stroke. First core turn forward, some stretching, at impact arm and racket at a higher velocity. Shoulder feels relaxed entire time because those muscles were only stretched and later provides some high speed force from pre-stretch...... ?
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
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  18. Fxanimator1

    Fxanimator1 Semi-Pro

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    This stroke came very naturally for me, the coach I had for several lessons 25 years ago thought I should use it as a weapon and thought it would be best to work on other parts of my game. I still use, what is considered a small racquet 90 sq in., but it feels comfortable to me and I rarely miss the center of the strings and I can't imagine switching to something radically different at this point.

    Other sports I did was boxing in the Army, which uses the leg's and core heavily for power. I think I translated that way of getting power to my tennis strokes (meaning core rotation and power derived from the ground up).

    I think your last sentence is a good description for the shoulder, it is getting stretched for a quick moment in time, but then feels very easy at impact and follow through.

    I hope the OP can gain some kind of knowledge based on how this thread has gone?
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
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  19. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Sorry, haven't been on in a few days, don't have much time.
    Your pivot of the front foot seems to lose power for you. You slide the front foot back, while swinging the backfoot forwards, for a weird scissors kick. If you keep the front foot stable or planted, you will gain power by not rotating backwards.
     
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  20. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    You got a nice serve there
     
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  21. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    They were slices. Despite never slicing in any of my previous videos, I do use the shot in match play. :)
     
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  22. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    Slice backhand, not topspin. My topspin is hit with two hands.
     
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  23. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    On the serve you mean?
     
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  24. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    Thanks. I set the phone to record on higher brightness. I never knew I could do that.
     
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  25. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Imagine the forward drive you'd get if your push off was with your lead foot, so you drive your body into the court, still twisting and rotating as your right foot comes around.
    Now, your lead foot, the left, is scissoring back, allowing your body to pivot into the serve.
     
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  26. 5point5

    5point5 Banned

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    I'd say mid-tier 4.5.
     
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