My thoughts on competitiveness

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by omega4, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    After reading a number of threads in this sub forum, I think I might be the only one who thinks that some players take their league tennis way too seriously.

    I like to win in life as much as the next person. But with the exception of my job and career, it isn't like winning in league tennis is the end all be all of my existence.

    I mean, it's not like we're playing in a million dollar tournament. So I think why don't more players lighten up and just have fun playing quality tennis?
     
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  2. Joeyg

    Joeyg Semi-Pro

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    Trust me, dude. You are not the only one out there.
     
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  3. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    Thanks for the support.

    And just to clarify in general, I have nothing against those who do take their league tennis extremely seriously. To each, their own.

    For me, if I should catch someone blatantly cheating during a league match, I'll say something politely to the offender. However, I will NOT insist on replaying the point or making an incredibly big deal about it.

    I'll just mention the offense just to let the cheater know that I'm not clueless as to what they're doing.

    But as to inadvertent rules violations (e.g. foot faults), I'll let most of those slide as long as it doesn't happen on EVERY service point.
     
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  4. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    You are definitely not in the minority. Tennis has a very high percentage of strange people who are wound tightly. There are at least three people on five courts of my tennis league who I do not like playing with or against and I tend to like everyone. Some of these people I just let slide with their bad calls simply because I am there to have fun. Do I want to win and compete? Sure. I also don't want to get into it with a guy who is a cheeseburger short of a Happy Meal.
     
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  5. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    I'm with you. As I don't have an pro tennis career aspirations (or delusions?), I'd much rather play with someone who is fun with a pleasant disposition than a great player who can't even crack a smile or manage to carry a conversation other than mumbling a few words.

    The same goes for my playing golf. I find playing a round with a good natured, fun novice more preferable than with a great golfer with a personality of a stone. The latter type of player can make a 4 hour golf round seem like a 8 hour round.
     
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  6. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    I am out there to get some exercise that is more interesting than a treadmill. It is also very social, which is a bonus. Winning a match is not important to me. I never argue about calls and I never get upset if my opponent is too good/bad.

    I do want to play well and compete, but at a rec level, there are just so many players better than you, winning a lot only proves that you are avoiding players who are better than you. That is really nothing to brag about.
     
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  7. fleabitten

    fleabitten Semi-Pro

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    Ummmm, right. Read a few more threads my friend. ;)
     
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  8. dizzlmcwizzl

    dizzlmcwizzl Hall of Fame

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    I think you will find most tennis folks (even on TT) are extremely generous and friendly on the court while in social situations. League tennis however is a small subset of most players court time.

    I have played a lot of league tennis, but in some years league tennis has represented less than 5% of my court time for the year. I suspect that if a player gets 5-6 league matches per year, then these matches take a lot more importance make them a little more an@l retentive.

    Personally, if it were the world according to DIZZ I would want teammates that were great to hang around and have fun with in non-league play. But once the league season begins and matches start getting recorded for posterity, I want someone who cares if they win or lose.
     
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  9. dizzlmcwizzl

    dizzlmcwizzl Hall of Fame

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    Additionally I bet people who play 60-70 league matches per season are a lot less rigid in league tennis. They are there just to use league tennis as just a way to get matches.
     
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  10. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    I like this world of DIZZ. I also care about winning and losing when it matters.

    I just don't think league tennis matters enough to me where I'd treat others poorly or be a jerk about it. It'd be different if I were playing in a tournament where millions of dollars in prize money was involved, but I'm not.
     
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  11. SwankPeRFection

    SwankPeRFection Hall of Fame

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    No joke here... One time we played a team who had two short Asian guys who would constantly foot fault no matter what. It's how their service motion was. And the foot fault was in by a good 6 inches or so. I laughed at the match, which we lost, but told them that if they make it to state they'd lose their ass for all the foot faults their doing. They disagreed. Fast forward to the end of that season and them making it to state and losing every single match they played. :lol: Turns out, people were getting ticked with it during matches and called in officials to make the calls. Foot fault city.
     
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  12. OrangePower

    OrangePower Hall of Fame

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    You my friend are a prince among men. You are definitely the only one seeing as the rest of us on this forum are all just lowly cretins.
     
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  13. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    I was just thinking a little more about my league. Maybe all leagues are like this, but you play three sets and switch partners at each. Most wins moves up and least wins moves down with the other two staying on that particular court. There are people that have all of the game scores figured out and know exactly what they need to move up, stay, or God forbid move down a court. These guys will be the first ones to want to quit at 4-4 if a time limit is coming up because they have it figured out. For me, I never really care about any of that. At the end of the night, it's always a surprise to me whether I stay or move to a different court. Some guys take it personally if they move down and blame others. "Man, I hate playing with Eddie in the first set. He plays once a week and it takes him a set to warm up." Part of me wants to remark, "Man, I hate playing with YOU because you coach and whine. Let's get this done." I'm too nice for that. Haha
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2013
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  14. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    I would have done exactly what you did. It's a shame that those 2 players didn't have the grace to thank you for sharing your observations and also for not calling foot faults on them.


    Ha ha. No, I'm also a lowly cretin but I don't get worked up over league tennis play (which I see as a good way to meet some great people over a fun sport).


    I feel exactly as you do. I wonder if players who are so intent on "gaming" the system are also the same ones who insist on splitting a meal check down to the penny (I just round to the nearest dollar or tens of dollars and offer to pay the greater amount if it's not an even split).
     
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  15. Mongolmike

    Mongolmike Professional

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    Loser.






    (just kidding.... lol!)

    As I have posted in other threads, I like to interact, joke, make friends, make the right calls as best as I can.... (but don't mistake that for lack of desire to win)... I'm just by nature an friendly extrovert and that is reflected in my on-court demeanor.

    Some doubles partners I've played with are all serious about stuff, with no friendly stuff allowed... so I dial it back, but I will still compliment opponents on great shots, hand them the balls on changeovers, etc... I just cut back on the joking or chit-chat.

    What this does for me is I have a huge list of people I can call to play, or have no problem finding partners for tourneys, or often get invited to play or recruited to join leagues or club stuff. You reap what you sow.
     
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  16. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    Quote for truth.

    Not the "loser" part LOL.

    The rest of what you said!

     
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  17. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

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    I can't stand foot faulters. And why do the culprits think it's no big deal? If foot faults are okay in a match, then might as well say balls slightly out are still in. Lines are there for a reason. Mini rant.
     
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  18. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Let me splash cold water on this little love fest: Losing sucks a lot.

    Or, more accurately, losing a lot sucks.

    I was on a losing team as a 3.0 in 2006. We finished 0-11. We won two individual matches. By the end we looked like whipped puppies. It was no fun. If you lose all the time, you never get a rush, and it is dispiriting.

    At that point, I decided to captain myself. We have had rough seasons, but we usually finish around the middle or better. I think our ability to be reasonably competitive is important. Folks don't want to lose all the time.

    Sadly, I have friends who would like to join the team, but I do not want to take on people who are not competitive. They do not understand this, ("this is supposed to be for fun!") but it is more complicated than that.
     
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  19. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    Cindy, all that says is that people on your team were playing at the wrong level.

    "Competitiveness" has little meaning in an artificially stratified system like USTA tennis.
     
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  20. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    I think it depends on what's being lost, which will differ from person to person.

    Losing a league match or tournament doesn't matter as much to me as losing at work in the corporate world or where money (e.g. prize money tournaments) is involved.

    While I will enjoy winning in league matches to some extent, I enjoy meeting new people over a fun, friendly match of tennis even more. So from that perspective, I feel that I've already "won".

     
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  21. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    I think Cindy is looking for players with the right "attitude", namely one of competitiveness and a desire to win.

    Others, like myself, enjoy winning but don't let losing affect us negatively, as we've already "won" by meeting new people over a fun tennis match.
     
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  22. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    I am reading Allen Fox's book on the mental aspects of tennis and competition. He talks a lot about why tennis is stressful. He mentions that the stress can increase depending on how much is invested. Examples: 1. if you are playing low level and only practice 1 a week so you can go out for beers afterward, then you will have a lower level of stress. 2. if you take weekly lessons at $40 a pop and practice 3 days a week and play league matches 2 days a week, you will likely have a higher level of stress because you have invested a lot of time and money into improvement and some of your ego and self-esteem is tied into the results, 3. if you are a pro trying to make a living and scrambling for $ to remain on tour and compete, stress will be very high.

    You get the gist. Even at rec levels, you will find high levels of stress depending on personalities and how much of themselves they have invested into tennis. I like to win and matches can get competitive and stressful, but I am in my mid-50s and balance that with 1. I am not getting paid, 2. as long as I compete well, losing is not the end all, and 3. I don't want to be an a**-hole on court. So, to me, balance is the key - compete hard to win but play fair and be nice and remember it is just a game for most of us.

    The book is Winning the Mental Match - about 1/2 way through it and I like it. He discusses several ways to deal with stress, choking, ...
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
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  23. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    I'm highly competitive in everything I do and want to be the best at whatever I do, so I'm highly competitive in tennis. That's why I spend a lot of time practicing, not just playing hit and giggle tennis. That's why I achieved a decently high level at tennis. Even though I know I will never be even close to the level I used to play, I still strive to improve given present circumstances. It was never about winning or losing matches - if someone wants to win matches they can be a 3.0 sandbagger - it has always been about achieving as high a level as possible.
     
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  24. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    I think these are words that many would do well to live by, as far as league-tennis is concerned.
     
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  25. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    I think that's great and to each their own.

    I only have an issue with a person's competitiveness when it adversely impacts my or others' enjoyment of the game. That's when I think a person selfishly puts his own well-being over that of others.

    Of course, the circumstances surrounding the event have to be taken into account. I think personal highly competitive behavior is better suited for money tournaments than a league-tennis where a team is comprised of a diverse levels of playing proficiency.
     
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  26. Joeyg

    Joeyg Semi-Pro

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    Let me clarify my position a bit. I love a tough match. I also hate to lose any match. I feel that USTA league tennis went sideways the moment they allowed a player to play on multiple teams. As far as I am concerned, team camaraderie went away and that is when you started to see matches become a blood sport played by mercenaries. The "COME ON", FIST PUMPING mentality pretty much started then. I am sure everyone knows at least one captain that recruits from everywhere and tries to get players to under rate their playing abilities. These slimeballs (and the players they recruit) are the real reason I stepped away from league tennis.

    Just my two cents!
     
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  27. jc4.0

    jc4.0 Professional

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    I play league tennis because it forces me to be more competitive, and try my hardest to win.

    I would never cheat or do anything unsportsmanlike - but I might try harder to figure out my opponents and do whatever it takes shot- and strategy- wise to win on that particular day. I also wouldn't "try out" shots that aren't my strongest - which I would definitely do if playing a friendly match.

    We won today in three tough sets - I adjusted my game throughout, playing my own strengths and probing the other team's weaknesses.

    It's great to win, but they were quality opponents and it could have gone either way - wouldn't have ruined my day to lose to them. The thing to keep in mind is that even if you lose a league match - it's more fun than showing up at a lame job.
     
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  28. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    I don't mind if the other team exhorts themselves demonstratively so long as it doesn't stop them from being friendly before, during, and after the match.
     
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  29. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    This is the attitude that I'll take towards league tennis.

    I'll do my best to win, but I won't let that interfere with meeting new friends and having fun playing a quality game of tennis.
     
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  30. kylebarendrick

    kylebarendrick Professional

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    Perspective helps: If I were to win nationals at 4.0, it would mean I still stink compared to "real" tennis players. Same goes for you 4.5s and 5.0s...
     
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  31. OrangePower

    OrangePower Hall of Fame

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    Completely agree with you about multiple teams and mercenaries.

    I actually think it takes a lot of skill to build a mercenary team. The captain has to be a great networker, salesman, manager, etc. But I would personally not want to be on such a team as it would kill off a lot of the enjoyment I get from team tennis.

    I don't see it as a reason to stop playing league tennis though. On my team we have a great dynamic, and we have a lot of fun. Of course, we get beaten by the super-mercenary team, but so what? We still end up with most matches being competitive, a lot of good tennis, and good times with teammates, even though our chances of advancing out of our local area playoffs are slim to none.
     
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  32. Tennis Truth

    Tennis Truth Rookie

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    If I would survey the teams I play on, I highly doubt anyone would say they are playing to "meet new friends."

    If that is your main goal, or even in the top three, you might be better off taking a dancing class or something.

    Or just play socially, in mixers or mixed doubles nights or something. But this is not really a typical league tennis attitude.

    We have all run into people who take a league match too seriously, but maybe the OP is on the other end of the spectrum.
     
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  33. Mike Y

    Mike Y Rookie

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    I disagree with what you are saying. I am as competitive as they come, but if I have a close league match, I often offer to play again sometime, and then I have a new person to hit with.
     
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  34. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    If your main goal, or even in the top three, is to win at league tennis or be ultra competitive, I hate to break it to you but at the end of the day, you're victories and league standing mean absolutely nothing in the grand scheme of things.

    You might be better off improving your skills so that you can actually compete at the pro level where victories actually mean something and result in tangible rewards, like, you know, vast sums of money.
     
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  35. Buford T Justice

    Buford T Justice Semi-Pro

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    What do you mean? I like the plastic tennis bag tag! Lol

    I agree.....seems like something about tennis makes a lot of people ultra competitive. I just don't see this in other recreational sports to the same degree. I run and play on a men's baseball team in a league that has quite a number of former pros playing in it. And, I very very rarely ever see any boisterous chest pounding " I think I am better than I am" that tennis seems to be stricken with.

    Example----

    Not once have a heard a guy brag about how many bats he can break! In tennis, it appears a badge of honor to be able to destroy a string bed in 2 hours (I'm not talking about Steam 99S here either). It doesn't make any sense.

    The reality is....if you are really really really good at any sport, you are not on a web board or local tennis complex telling people about it (there's no need as its obvious.).
     
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  36. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    Arnold Schwartzenegger had something similar to say.

    "The better you get, the less you run around showing off as a muscle guy. You know, you wear regular shirts-not always trying to show off what you have. You talk less about it. It's like you have a little BMW-you want to race the hell out of this car, because you know it's just going 110. But if you see guys driving a Ferrari or a Lamborghini, they slide around at 60 on the freeway because they know if they press on that accelerator they are going to go 170. These things are the same in every field."
     
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  37. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    Completely agreed.
     
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  38. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    I don't think so. Winning and losing keeps them excited about the game. They will never play at the pro level so that is not an issue.

    It is only a problem if they lose their temper or cheat or are nasty to others, and that happens sometimes, but not as much in real life as portrayed by anecdotes on this board.
     
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  39. skiracer55

    skiracer55 Hall of Fame

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    Works for me...

    ...some interesting things to note about this thread...which has passed through the TW fora a few times, in different guises:

    - The OP started by saying "After reading a number of threads in this sub forum, I think I might be the only one who thinks that some players take their league tennis way too seriously." So this is also my take, looking from the outside, at the way some league players look at USTA life on a tennis court.

    - However...and there's nothing wrong with this...some replies shift over to "This is how I think you ought to treat league tennis." As in where Cindyspinx says "Let me splash cold water on this little love fest: Losing sucks a lot.

    Or, more accurately, losing a lot sucks.

    I was on a losing team as a 3.0 in 2006. We finished 0-11. We won two individual matches. By the end we looked like whipped puppies. It was no fun. If you lose all the time, you never get a rush, and it is dispiriting."

    ...to which Gameboy replies, and this might be the central issue of wins and losses in USTA leagues:

    "

    Cindy, all that says is that people on your team were playing at the wrong level.

    "Competitiveness" has little meaning in an artificially stratified system like USTA tennis."

    In other words, as NLBwell says, above, if ya wanna win, sandbag like there is no tomorrow.

    - The kind of interesting codicil to all this is another thread that goes round and round, which is "USTA leagues need to change because [and you fill in the blank, where cheating, sandbagging, unsportsmanlike conduct, and so forth, are just the start of the list].

    The thing is, the USTA league approach to tennis probably isn't going to change now or any time soon...which means if you don't like what you see in USTA leagues, you can leave, as JoeyG notes:

    "Let me clarify my position a bit. I love a tough match. I also hate to lose any match. I feel that USTA league tennis went sideways the moment they allowed a player to play on multiple teams. As far as I am concerned, team camaraderie went away and that is when you started to see matches become a blood sport played by mercenaries. The "COME ON", FIST PUMPING mentality pretty much started then. I am sure everyone knows at least one captain that recruits from everywhere and tries to get players to under rate their playing abilities. These slimeballs (and the players they recruit) are the real reason I stepped away from league tennis."

    It's not a jailbreak...there is life outside of USTA leagues on a tennis court, even if you want to play competitively...try age groups, for example, which tend to be highly competitive but with real sportsmanship, IMHO.

    My winter sport is Masters alpine ski racing. There's sort of an NTRP equivalent, but what most racers care about, in terms of pure results, is how they do in their age group and how they do overall in the whole field...and it's not just kids who top out the Elites (top 15, regardless of age, across all age groups, men and women). I'm 64 and every time I step into the start gate I'm racing against at least 3 or 4 present or former Masters National Champions, and we all know whoever wins our class is probably going to make top 5 in the elites.

    And yep, none of us Chronologically Challenged ski racers like losing, but what we really like is going faster on skis than most people can legally drive their cars...and a few beers after the race...so we all get along pretty well.

    There's also one major difference between tennis and ski racing: yeah, you have something to lose on a tennis court, namely: a match. In ski racing, sometimes you lose more than the race. You end up in the ER. I've broken ribs, an arm, my collar bone, dislocated my shoulder, torn cartilage in my knee, torn my rotator cuff...let's see, I think that's about it. Which is not much, really. One of my teammates was on the podium and dumped it three gates from the finish in the National DH two seasons ago...and ended up with a broken tib/fib, torn patellar tendon, blown ACL, and a compromised tibial plateau. But he's done his rehab, and is back on the snow this year.

    So ski racers compete fiercely, but they also know that ski racers are a family, and you embrace your friends when they get hurt.

    Or die. Harold Westcott was one of the Senior Citizens (read: even older than I am) who retired and followed his passion, which was to be the best ski racer he could be.

    Which he did. He had a breakthrough downhill race, best race he ever skied, best result, and everybody knew it and was overjoyed for him, even the guys he waxed. Next day, same course, he dies during the race. It's not a tragedy, however, because we all know he had a big smile on his face...
     
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  40. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    Possibly perhaps. I do know some golfers who can only sustain their interest in golf by betting money so what you say is true for some.

    Personally, I will play a sport (e.g. golf, tennis) because I'm interested and excited about them. Otherwise, I won't play them. I don't need an ulterior motive like gambling or the need to win to keep me interested in doing something.

    This applies to games and sports though. When it comes to work and career, I'll do something that I don't necessarily thoroughly enjoy simply to bring home a substantially large paycheck (i.e. golden handcuffs). Gotta pay the bills after all and pay off the credit cards after buying all that golf and tennis equipment.
     
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  41. omega4

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    More power to you.

    Personally, I can't see how any "leisure" sports activity can be fun when it involves potentially injuring oneself to the point of dying without any monetary payoff (e.g. professional skier).

    Then again, I've never been and will never be an "adrenaline junkie".

     
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  42. dizzlmcwizzl

    dizzlmcwizzl Hall of Fame

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    I hate it when people make this argument. It adds absolutely no value to a tennis discussion board. As is true in almost everything in life you do, nothing means something in the cosmic scheme of things.

    If you spend 15 hours a week volunteering at homeless shelters I will give you that this amounts to a substantial contribution to society. But unless you invented physics, get sainted, or develop a cure for cancer ... in 1000 years no one one this planet will even know you existed.

    So please, just let us enjoy our perversions. For us, one of which includes obsessing about our league tennis experience and posting about it on the competitive tennis discussion board.
     
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  43. spot

    spot Hall of Fame

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    And there is a difference between playing tennis and playing league tennis. If I don't care who wins or not then I will just go play pickup tennis with friends. For me to get up early and drive 45 minutes to a match then I do it because I like the camaraderie of being on a team and I want the team to be successful. I wouldn't play on a team that didn't care about winning- in that case I would simply play pickup tennis on the schedule that is convenient for me.

    The important thing is balance. Our teams are competitively run and we play the best players as often as they are available while the lower lines will play less. But we also value the social aspect and regularly have 6 courts full for practice nights and have 15 or 16 people going out for drinks afterward. People may be disappointed if they lose a match but they will still going to stick around and cheer on the team even if they lose. This balance has been very successful and twice we have split the team as we have had more and more people want to join. Now we have 3 teams that operate together and it works out great.

    But someone who doesn't care about winning in league tennis would likely hate our team. Its just about finding the right team balance for you. Though it sounds like for you then playing flex league would be a better choice overall since you get no benefit out of the league aspect.
     
    #43
  44. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

    Joined:
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    You DO know that you can continue to enjoy your "perversions" as you put it by ignoring this thread, right?

    Please allow us to continue discussing why some people enjoy their "perversions" as you put it when at the end of the day, it means absolutely nothing in the grand scheme of things.

    My point is that I think winning league tennis victories (via ultra competitiveness) is fleeting whereas the friendships I make (e.g. from league tennis) will last forever.

     
    #44
  45. omega4

    omega4 Rookie

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    Location:
    Atlanta GA
    I'm all for balance. I like to win. The difference is I won't let winning or losing get in the way of making new friends and enjoying my time playing some quality tennis.

    In other words, you will NEVER find me sulking off in a corner or throwing a temper tantrum because my league tennis team lost its matches or didn't make the playoffs.

    The fact that I'll make new friends and enjoy my time playing quality tennis with good people means that I've already "won" in something like league tennis.

     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2013
    #45
  46. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Like I've learned from a chess coach, one only competes to himself, so as long as one does his best and makes progress, one should be happy.

    Now, personally, I need to do a better job of learning how to relax, b/c I tend to play way worse in match situations. And then I get upset b/c my level of play has dropped, win or lose.

    I think that it take a few years of playing (at least for me) to handle that and build confidence (it has happened in other sports as well).

    Some things help, like recently a tip that keeping moving all the time, between hits, helps staying relaxed and also that video about hitting with "minimal effort". Plus the fact that power should come last.
     
    #46
  47. Tennis Truth

    Tennis Truth Rookie

    Joined:
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    Is the OP trolling here? Who writes that they are the only person who thinks some people take league tennis too seriously? Seriously? There are numerous threads about this topic.

    Where I live, playing league tennis is NOT the best way to "make new friends." Most of the teams are from different towns, and there is travel involved.

    A much better idea is to make friends who live by you, and who play at the same places you play.

    Of all of the potential ways to "make new friends," while playing tennis, I think league tennis would be at the bottom.

    Try taking a class or clinic. Sign up for a group lesson. Go to a social mixer. Talk with the pro who can probably set you up with potential partners.
     
    #47
  48. Tennis Truth

    Tennis Truth Rookie

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    Here are MY thoughts on competitiveness

    1) There is a relatively small percentage of people who take it too seriously, and who can make a match less fun for some people.
    2) The vast majority want to win, and play fairly.
    3) There is another small percentage who take league tennis less seriously than most. These people play for a different reason than most on their team. They may just want to get some exercise, or make new friends, and they don't really care about the match result. They feel that if they get along well with their opponent, that is a "win" for them. These people usually win less, because they don't really care about the result.

    It may also depend somewhat on the level of play. At higher levels, people have been playing longer usually, and I see less bad behavior. It can still happen, but there are fewer players at the higher levels, and if you are a jerk to too many people, no one will want to play with you.
     
    #48
  49. AR15

    AR15 Professional

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    You don't have to act like a jerk to be taking your league tennis too seriously. I recently had an older player tell me that he had played for years and years, and sadly just realized that in all those years he really never got to know or develop friendships with the people he played with and against.

    When I heard this, it made me think of all the times I played, and didn't take the time to really talk with and enjoy the people I was playing with. I'm making an effort to change this, by putting my tennis in perspective, and bringing more than just my tennis to the courts with me.:)
     
    #49
  50. TheCanadian

    TheCanadian Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2011
    Messages:
    479
    This is why I've stopped competing. I have enough stress in my life and I don't need to get into fights with jerks about some meaningless match in the grand scheme of things. We're not even playing for money.

    My last experience was playing a heavy top spin, clay court specialist with extreme grips who wins his matches because he gets the ball back and is in excellent shape. We played two games on clay for about 25 minutes. At the end of it, I went to get my towell and was towelling off without drinking or sitting down when he told me: "this is no time for a break!" I looked at him and said, "are you going to count the seconds? I'm just here to have fun." When I walked up to the line to serve, he turned around and his back was facing me. I picked up my things and left. This guy has a reputation in my neck of the woods for being an ass. I told him that while leaving and he walked up to the fence and grabbed his genitals like a monkey in a zoo.

    So, he constantly gets into insane fights over line calls (he frequently walks to the other side to check marks...I thought that was against the rules...can somebody verify?), and was many times very close to getting into fist fights with people. I'm not a soccer hooligan.

    I don't need this hassle in my life.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2013
    #50

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