need advice for 10 years old boy

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by alberto007, Apr 3, 2006.

  1. alberto007

    alberto007 New User

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    Here is the situation:
    Currently my son is ranked No.1 at our tennis club. He currently uses a Fisher racquet that weights 10.6 oz strung. Now, he has a powerfull forhand and 2 hands backhand. He loves to hit with a lot of spin. His pro says that is tiem to change racquets, something more heavy since he has a lot of power. We were looking at racquts specs and we came out with the following choices:
    1. Yonex RDX-300
    2. Yonex RDS-003
    3. Babolat AeroPro Drive (i think is to heavy)
    4. Head Flexpoint Radical
    Now, weight of these racquets are between 11.0 and 11.1 oz except the Babolat that has 11.3 oz. Head size 98 -100. Head lights. Can you give me an advice which racquet that he should use? I am a current user of Yonex rdx 500 (3) and just bought rds 001 (2). I love Yonex racquets but i am not the one who is going to use the racquet eventhough I know how my son tennis shots are very suitable for Yonex frames. Thanks in advance.
     
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  2. billyboybeacon

    billyboybeacon Rookie

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    I have spent alot of money thinking a racket was going to be better...take 3-4 rackets out for a 2 hour demo, one or two will bubble to the top..03 red would be one I have him hit..
     
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  3. betiYonex

    betiYonex New User

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    Hy friend.
    I´m reading you and seeing myself.
    I've had the same problem with my son.
    We are four tennis players and teachers and also Yonex fans. I´ve been sponsored by them.
    I hit with RDX 500 mp and my brother in law (23 years old) with RDX 300 mp .
    My 11 years old son was hitting with an old RQ1400 customized to 26" till two months ago. I am his trainer. He is a good tennis player but now hi is sticked with soccer and don´t practice tennis the regularly and frequently i'd like. But it´s his decision and I respect.
    I´ve switched him to a new YONEX frame, but I thought RDX300 is a bit heavy for him. He hited OK and powerful, but was unable to play with the variety of strokes he used with a lighter racquet. We agreed to go for a RDX100 mp (in Europe) with 270 gr (¿?oz) and half an inch longer.
    I was affraid about the extra length, but the first week he noticed in the service motion but now he has adapted.
    In my opinion the crucial point is the head speed he can impart.
    I think it´s better for him in the long way to continue developing all different strokes than getting powerful and stable shots from the back. At their age is easy to win with firm forehand and backhand, but ¿in the future?
    Think as father, tennis coaches usually tries to get kid champions and retired teenagers. It´s usual to see teenagers without the weapons to survive and win over more complete players.
    To get the power try with a softer string or lower tension.
    Other problem is concerned with the grip size. Stay alert with it. The RDX100 exists in grip 1 (4 1/8) and RDX300 starts in 2. Adult frames with incorrect grip size may hurt him.
    Hoping to help.

    Regards
     
    #3
  4. alberto007

    alberto007 New User

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    thanks

    Thanks for your imputs:
    I want to add something:
    I bought the RDX300 and string @ 55 lbs. Since we are going for vacation to North Carolina, my son will go to tennis capm. He is going to try with the new racquet. After that, well, If he does not like it, I guess it will be time to do more reserach. I live in Venezuela, I can not demo racquets, therefore I just do the ebst i can with the specs and the help of the forum. I will keep you posted regarding his experience with the new racquet. Only concern that ir ead was that his variaty of shoots can be hurt, I hope not but again, we will evaluate and I post the results here.
    Regarding the friend whose son play football. Well, I asl my son, if he wants soccer or tennis. He made his choice :) but I will never force him to persue a sport that he will not give 100%.
    I want to thank you for your imput.
     
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  5. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

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    I have a 13 year-old son who was #2 in the 10's and #1 in the 12's, all with a Wilson Hyper Hammer 26". There's a reason that they have the player height/racquet size scale, and I'd highly recommend you consider it. Unfortunately, many do not. My son was able to stay on top of his competitors in large part because he had not moved up to a heavier racquet like the rest of them. He was able to generate racquet-head speed, maintain maneuverability, and last three-setters because of the size and weight. I saw many boys his age struggling to play with popular racquets in the 11+ oz range. They cannot maintain their form, react as quickly, or control the ball as well. Even when he moved to an adult racquet last year, I took him up an intermediate step to the Babolat VS NCT Tour, which is still a lighter-weight 27" racquet at 10.3 oz. Remember, you can always add lead tape if needed, but you cannot make the racquet lighter. I trust your pro is on top of this and knows your son's capabilities (his size, weight, strength, strokes), but I've also seen pros suggest kids move up too quickly. Make sure he has a stick he can fully control and you will avoid poor strokes and potential for injury.

    Good luck!
     
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  6. 10SDad

    10SDad Rookie

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    One other point. I purchased my own stringer which allowed me to vary/test his optimal string tension. I was able to temper his increasing power with both the Wilson and the Babolat by testing/increasing his string tension and varying the string type. That has allowed him to stay with the racquets that fit him physically, while maintaining his balance between power and control. The higher tensions have only benefitted his ball control.
     
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  7. ruth

    ruth New User

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    w-line are good demo them.
     
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  8. pached

    pached New User

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    W-Line is for women and girls. The poster's son is a boy.
     
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  9. Midlife crisis

    Midlife crisis Hall of Fame

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    I agree with this. My 12 year old son is 5'3" and 125 lbs, and he's been weight lifting for over three years. He has the weight lifting ability of a smaller adult but still isn't able to handle a racquet much above 10.5 ounces or so when he has to make a swing on a shoulder high or higher ball. Like 10sdad, I also see other kids struggling with near 11 ounce frames when I'm sure they don't have the isometric or functional strength that my son has.
     
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  10. doriancito

    doriancito Hall of Fame

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    look for the AeroStrike at babolats webpage and you might like it my brother who is 11 just bought one and just loves it, it has a good weight and balance, it could fit your son
     
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  11. DRtenniS1112

    DRtenniS1112 Semi-Pro

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    U seriously have had ur son lifting weights since he was 9. I hope this isnt anything too strenuous.
     
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  12. tangies08

    tangies08 New User

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    Do not make the mistake of getting your son a 11.5+ ounce racket. While it may seem solid there are no 10 year olds I know who are strong enough to use a racket like that effectively. Getting good racket speed, which is what he should be focusing on, is extremely hard with a heavy racket like that, esp. for a 10 year old. If he is switching rackets he should try out something like the Prince Shark or Babolat Pure Drive
     
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  13. FuZz_Da_AcE

    FuZz_Da_AcE Rookie

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    Is your son the no.1 junior, or the club champ? if he is the latter, he is obviously hitting the sweetspot rather often, and should be rewarded for it, therefore although i like the yonex racquets, i say the flexpoint is a good chioce. but go and demo them to be sure!
     
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  14. Midlife crisis

    Midlife crisis Hall of Fame

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    It was pretty unusual at the time, but in the last couple of years there have been studies showing that weight lifting, if performed correctly, is beneficial for kids as young as six or seven. For him, we started because he was pitching in little league and the weight lifting was for body balance and injury prevention. I think that the proper way to go about it is to look at it from the body balance perspective, and take any functional gains in athletic ability as just a side benefit. To push a kid to lift in a way to maximize their functional ability is probably not good at that age.
     
    #14

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