Need reccomendation for wood racquet stringing

Discussion in 'Strings' started by Thunderace, Jul 14, 2006.

  1. Thunderace

    Thunderace Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Messages:
    106
    Hi, I just bought a wood racket (Maxply Fort) and this is my very first experience with a woodie! I'm very exited to try it out...
    ...But I have no clue with the strings and the tension. I bet a full gut job would be the best thing to go, but I can't afford the price right now. What do you suggest? A good multi should do the trick also...
    Most importantly, what tension should I apply???
    As a reference, I normally string my Diablo Mid with a soft multi (no hybrids), Klip Excellerator, TNT2 or NRG at 50 lbs, so on the lower side of the spectrum... given this, how low should I go with my new wood babe?
     
    #1
  2. Thunderace

    Thunderace Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Messages:
    106
    I need a good old RECOMMENDATION of course, not a reccomendation or whatever, lol...
     
    #2
  3. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,240
    The tension range on the Maxply Fort is 53-57 lbs. Here are the comments from the USRSA website on this frame;

    "Note: Shared holes: 7T,8T,10T & 7H,8H,9H. W-slot will accommodate short side to ensure proper X placement."

    This means that you have a main and a cross sharing the same hole at these locations. I believe the W-slot is a channel cut into the outside of the frame on one of the bottom shoulders. I think a soft multi would be fine in it. You might want to use some power pads where the holes are very close together.
     
    #3
  4. Midlife crisis

    Midlife crisis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,577
    My current practice racquet is a Maxply Fort. I strung it with pre-stretched NXT OS at 52 pounds on a lockout machine and that feels just about right for me. I typically prefer tensions on the higher end of the range.

    The most important thing is to orient the short side correctly. The short side should be the side with the continuous channel cut into the head of the racquet. If you reverse this, you'll have strings that sit outside of the frame, which means one good scrape against the ground and that string will break.

    I got this frame used and so some of the holes already had these little plastic "power pad" like pieces glued to it. There are quite a few places where these could be useful, but I recently strung up my Jack Kramer Autograph without these and it also worked fine.
     
    #4
  5. Thunderace

    Thunderace Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Messages:
    106
    Thanks for the recommendations. :)
    Hmm, power pads, how can I get some? I don't think I can buy pads per se. Do you cut leather pieces from belts, or so?
     
    #5
  6. Thunderace

    Thunderace Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Messages:
    106
    Actually, as I look at it the W-slot is located in the upper hoop, where the bumper guard of a graphite begins (10 o'clock).
     
    #6
  7. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,240
    Midlife Crisis did a better job of described the W-slot or channel. Anway, just make sure that's where you install the short side string. You can buy strips for making power pads from GSS or you can make your own out of leather strips or old belts or even left over synthetic grip material(the cushioned type).
     
    #7
  8. TennisProPaul

    TennisProPaul Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    Messages:
    691
    post a picture
     
    #8
  9. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    12,545
    Location:
    at the bottom of every hill I come to
    I string all my wood rackets at around 58 pounds, +/- 3 pounds.
     
    #9
  10. Thunderace

    Thunderace Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Messages:
    106
    Gut?
     
    #10
  11. spt

    spt Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Messages:
    126
    If you want the true feel for what players in the 70 and 80 were dealing with, you need to buy some Leonia 66. The only three real choices were that, stay-tight (a blue spiral nylon) or VS Gut. You also had blue star as a choice but unless you could get the "super blue star" the regular stuff was bad even back then. Also, they cut super blue star at 22' and 11' instead of one piece or two 16' pieces.
     
    #11
  12. Thunderace

    Thunderace Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Messages:
    106
    Leonia 66 is a pretty cheapo piece of crap if I'm not going wrong, real dead feeling. No clue about the blue star thing.
    Yes I know I should go gut (Bab VS) but simply cannot afford it! I'll stick with my multi and keep the tenison loose, bout 50 lbs or so. Can't wait to hit with this thing!
     
    #12
  13. Midlife crisis

    Midlife crisis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,577
    I have a strip of power pad material that I got probably 20+ years ago, but I also know of a stringer who re-uses old leather grips. He cuts the bevels off the sides of the grip and then can get two lengthwise strips for powerpads. One grip is enough to last a lifetime, apparently.
     
    #13
  14. Midlife crisis

    Midlife crisis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,577
    And then you have to finish it off by wrapping two sets of that colored thread above the top cross and below the bottom cross. Gotta have that authentic look. . .
     
    #14
  15. theace21

    theace21 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2004
    Messages:
    3,263
    I loved blue star, it would fray like gut...Didn't last, stretched like crazy. Good times. I still got one guy that only will use Leonia 66 - I have tried to get him to try something different - he won't!!! I have a few sets on hand just for him. I have been stringing for him for 25 years!!! Customer is always right!!!
     
    #15

Share This Page