Need some advice from One-handers

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by gino, Mar 24, 2013.

  1. ultradr

    ultradr Hall of Fame

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    Well, Head Prestige line was the one with which I made a break thru in my 1 handed backhand and it became my best shot.
    But it was the 18x20, 12 oz one. I think it was because it had reasonable weight and
    excellent control. I would also love to try Pro Kenex though.
     
    #51
  2. gino

    gino Hall of Fame

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    I'm looking into picking up a few Microgel Prestige Pros. They seem more flexible then the previous prestiges that I have used. Also, I like the low SW
     
    #52
  3. robbo1970

    robbo1970 Hall of Fame

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    VVVV Dunlop 300
     
    #53
  4. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    gino, if you're really into Head products, disregard any remarks about Volkl and Pro Kennex, and don't look at the old racquetresearch site.

    Buy a Head of some sort.
     
    #54
  5. vegasgt3

    vegasgt3 Rookie

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    Best Racquets for a one-handed backhand that I've played are:
    Dunlop Bio 200
    Head Prestige Pro Youtek YG
    Yonex VCore 89
    Head Extreme 2.0 Pro
     
    #55
  6. gino

    gino Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for the suggestions. I think I'll end up going with one of these options

    Microgel Prestige Pro
    Youtek IG Prestige S
    Graphene Speed Rev/Speed IG 300
    Wilson BLX Pro Cobra
    Radical IG Pro
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2013
    #56
  7. TfReAk

    TfReAk Rookie

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    You should demo the Mantis pro 295. It was truly a delight to a one handed bakchand with that racket. In stock it's already very stable and has some good power, but it is also a very nice platform to customize.

    It's definitly worth a demo!
     
    #57
  8. gino

    gino Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for the advice. I think I am partial to HEAD and Wilson sticks. Wilson sticks always have provided me with better feel, but you can't compete with HEAD's quality control and diversity of traditional offerings.
     
    #58
  9. Radicalized

    Radicalized Semi-Pro

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    Disclosure: I'm not a racquet "tester." Every once in a while I'll try out someone's stick, but that is about it. This isn't a racquet model suggestion, just my input regarding a racquet's "final" specs, whether modified or "stock."

    My $0.02 regarding this almost lost art (1HBH) and protecting one's arm:

    High 50s to low 60s stiffness
    Mass: 12.2 to 12.5oz. for me now

    I like my racquet 10-12 headlight.

    I've always been of the belief mass protects more than hurts. My arm is two decades out from yours, but still hanging in there. Legs, too.

    I still use Liquidmetal Radical racquets for disclosure, both the OS and MP (despite what the signature says).
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2013
    #59
  10. gino

    gino Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for your input, Radicalized. Do you have an opinion on swingweight and how that protects/potentially injures the arm?
     
    #60
  11. Radicalized

    Radicalized Semi-Pro

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    This isn't going to be very scientific because:

    1) While I can weigh precisely and check balance, swingweight requires a machine (aside from DIY methods I'll disregard because I'm not sure how well I did it, nor did I have a number of "machine" swingweights to compare for "accuracy").

    2) I have to base my thoughts on the few racquets I've used with similar specs.

    3) Swingweight is obviously related to motion, but each player swings differently.

    4) Different racquets will have different swingweights depending how the weight is distributed. I don't have precise information on that.

    The numbers I would have to give you would be 320-330. Again, this is just an estimate from specs of racquets. So, that is disclosed as well, so you know where I'm coming from.

    I'm not a racquet "tester" as I've noted. A lot of players on here seem to have closets full. But I have played with a few, and changed the static weight and balance a lot.

    Basically, with what I said above, you need enough weight to overcome the force of the ball. I look at it this way. Here comes the ball at X miles per hour. The ball weighs X coming in. I want the racquet to have enough weight to handle that ball. In the collision, I want to win. However, at the same time, I want a headlight racquet to maneuver the frame into position. I don't want to have some frame that leaves me late to the ball, even if the racquet is heavy. Also, I play all around the court, so I don't want to have to be waving around this massive head to volley or whatever. But you still need frame stability and some mass to handle the ball without that force being applied to your arm. So, I prefer heavier, and quite head light.

    I guess I could turn this into a physics problem, but I'd rather just think of how it feels when playing.

    Also, I know I could get heavier stock racquets, but the result is adequate for me. Look, I'm a one-hander wielding a katana, not a two-hander wielding a broadsword.

    And of course, remember what I noted above regarding stiffness.

    And let me add, I like to slice a lot, even though I wouldn't call it a "primary shot."
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
    #61
  12. gino

    gino Hall of Fame

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    Thanks again Radicalized ^^^

    Does anyone have thoughts on the IG Rad Pro and maneuverability?
     
    #62
  13. KMV

    KMV New User

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    I've found the pro staff to be the best in terms of driving thru with a 1hb, returning serves and slicing. Radical is easiest on the arm but don't get the same weight of shoot and found it to be a poor stick to return serve
     
    #63
  14. RiggensAuroraHO

    RiggensAuroraHO Rookie

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    I absorb three things as your main idea from your initial post:

    1. Level of play
    2. 1HBH
    3. Golfer's Elbow

    Level of play definitely affects injury rate and severeness due to amount of training and degree of precision. 1HBHs have zero affect on golfer's elbow because you do not supinate while hitting 1HBHs, unless, you are dropping or unlocking your wrist at contact, which is somewhat inconceivable if you are attempting to hit a rally ball and not a drop shot. However, elbow health, level of play, string bed softness, and racquet stiffness, all do intersect. After reading the follow-up comment's, it appears that you are looking for a racquet which is easy on the arm, has more margin for error because of your level of play, and provides for a forgiving string bed.

    Would that be a correct assessment? If so, go for a more oval head shape; 16 mains; heavier in weight as opposed to lighter; looser string tensions; and syn gut rather than poly, especially on a DIII team's budget.
     
    #64
  15. gino

    gino Hall of Fame

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    Essentially, this is the perfect assessment. Thanks for your comments RiggensAuroraHO

    I guess it's preference between the Radical IG Pro and the Speed 300 at this point
     
    #65
  16. NE1for10is?

    NE1for10is? Semi-Pro

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    I agree. I am just getting over Golfer's elbow issues now and it has nothing to do with the 1HBH. It's all the serve and forehand from either too stiff a racquet and/or too stiff strings. If you're using poly strings I would go to a soft multi or natural gut until the symptoms go away. Otherwise, no matter how soft your racquet, you're probably going to have the elbow issue with poly.
     
    #66
  17. gino

    gino Hall of Fame

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    Well luckily Ashaway has just recently released Monogut Zyex which gives players like us with elbow problems a chance to use a string that plays like a poly but effects your arm like natural gut

    What do you guys think of the Radical Pro vs the IG Speed 300?
     
    #67
  18. Brocolt

    Brocolt Rookie

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    I played with the Pure drive for a few years developed GE and the broke my wrist. I was ble to play with the pure drive after the wrist injury then switched to the new blade and started to get wrist pain and now the only racket I can play with is the Prince exo tour. I get a little pain in the wrist but I can at least play. With any of the above rackets two hits and the wrist is toast. The prince has pretty much resolved all of the GE also. Strung with a Multi at 50lbs.
     
    #68
  19. gino

    gino Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for weighing in. I appreciate the advice, the Prince exo3 tour is another racket I looked into briefly.
     
    #69
  20. UCSF2012

    UCSF2012 Hall of Fame

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    Then your first solution is to put those new Ashaway strings in your 6.1 95. That way, you determine whether those Solinco strings at 56lbs is the problem. It may not be the racquet, it may be the strings.
     
    #70
  21. gino

    gino Hall of Fame

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    Yeah definitely a great first step. Ill follow up with you guys when I can return to the court (next 1-2 weeks) and how those strings feel.

    I feel like the only problem I have with my six.one is the stiffness and Wilson's QC drives me absolutely mad. I swear the one of my sticks feels so different from the other ones that I have based on skewed swing weight that can't really be fixed with customization.
     
    #71
  22. gino

    gino Hall of Fame

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    How do you guys feel about the Volkl C10 Pro 2012?

    Seems to fit my spec needs
     
    #72
  23. I Heart Thomas Muster

    I Heart Thomas Muster Semi-Pro

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    I played the previous C10 Pro and that thing was sweet. Great spin, comfort and stability.

    Other racquets you might consider (if they haven't already been posted)

    Pacific X-Force Pro
    Tecnifibre TFight 315 Ltd. 16 Main (will probably require some additional weight though)
     
    #73
  24. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    ^agreed the C10 Pro is sweet...just wish it was a little lighter (static weight).
     
    #74
  25. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Too heavy for a spinny player. Good for the flatter hitters. Didn't like feeling the racket bend on each shot.
     
    #75
  26. Supertegwyn

    Supertegwyn Hall of Fame

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    I play with the HEAD Youtek IG Radical Pro (16x19) (two handed) and I love it, real great feel. That's just me though.
     
    #76
  27. gmorera

    gmorera New User

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    I'm 50 years-old, flat hitter, long swing and one-handed BH. I started to suffer also elbow issues and after testing many rackets, i moved to the volkl c10 pro 2012 model with Prince Premier control 16g at 25 kg. no more pain and i'm playing better than ever.
    I'm enjoying tennis again.
     
    #77
  28. NE1for10is?

    NE1for10is? Semi-Pro

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    I also use the Head Youhtek Radical Pro with X1 Biphase. No arm pain and I'm playing the best I've played in years.
     
    #78

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