Need to make some changes

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by dolphinsrus, Apr 8, 2014.

  1. dolphinsrus

    dolphinsrus New User

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    Tennis is not treating me really nice lately. Don't misunderstand me, I love it as much as any player here, but I end up my matches with physical pain. Would love to hear from other players how to deal with these issues (I know I am 42 and no longer a youngster) but I want to keep playing 2 or 3 sets in good condition like I did few months ago:

    *Knee pain: I play on hard courts and lately playing with pain on my knee. My own diagnostic is that I have jumpers knee from overusing it. So I play with a knee brace, but still my knee bother. I have this condition for 3 months. Is there any exercise to strengthen the knees and get rid of the problem? I used to run 10 miles on Saturdays, but can't do it lately because of the pain.

    *Tennis elbow is coming back: I feel a little bit of pain on my elbow again. Thus, I am also using a brace. I got back to my soft string and low tension. Icing it and theraband. Hope this goes away. Any other advice?

    *Plantar fasciitis: This has been bothering for years. Come and go. Is there any exercise you guys recommend to get rid of this once and for all?

    *More stamina: Lately I feel tired during matches -even on the first set-. Last year I used to play 3 sets without issues. Any recommendation to improve my stamina and get more energy?

    As you can see I refuse to retire. Love the game so your input is crucial. Thanks.
     
    #1
  2. Ace47

    Ace47 New User

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    Hey Dolphin,

    Both your tennis elbow and plantar fasciitis can be healed with a blood flow stimulator. Your blood carries oxygen and nutrients to repair damaged soft tissue, the amount of time it takes for it to heal on it's own is usually too long for anyone that is still active to avoid re-aggravation in the process. Depending on the source of your knee pain it could help with that too. The best part of using a blood flow stimulator is that it works in prevention as well as healing if you use it before playing. As for the stamina I'd recommend herbal supplements, I use Maca Root before going to the gym and that gives me a ton of energy... I've put links to the blood flow stimulator below as well information on your injuries.

    http://www.kingbrand.com/Plantar_Fasciitis_Treatment.php?REF=52PV1
    http://www.kingbrand.com/Tennis-Elbow.php?REF=52PV9
     
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  3. Alexrb

    Alexrb Rookie

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    Clearwater, FL
    My father is in a similar situation. Problem with him is, he will continue to ask for advice but never make any changes. I hope for your sake you aren't the same way.

    On the knee pain: I'm sure you've thought of this, but am just curious. Why not exclusively play on clay? I know quite a few older people in my area that do this. If a little inconvenience would allow you to play tennis for more years, why not?

    On the fitness: Cross train on surfaces that are NOT hard. My father plays basketball and tennis on hard courts, and then walks and runs on concrete. No wonder his knees hurt. IMO you don't get more dumb that that. Ex. swim/bike/run on grass.
     
    #3
  4. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    > *Knee pain: I play on hard courts and lately playing with pain on my
    > knee. My own diagnostic is that I have jumpers knee from overusing
    > it. So I play with a knee brace, but still my knee bother. I have
    > this condition for 3 months. Is there any exercise to strengthen the
    > knees and get rid of the problem? I used to run 10 miles on
    > Saturdays, but can't do it lately because of the pain.

    Work on getting your quads stronger. A simple exercise is to sit in a chair, and hold one leg out straight for 45 seconds to a minute. Then do the other leg. Another is to lie down with one leg straight and the other at an angle. Push down on the floor with the leg at an angle as hard as you can for 45 seconds. Then do the other. Another exercise if you have a gym is to do leg extensions.

    Stretch the hamstrings.

    Do balance exercises. Stand on one leg for 45 seconds. When you can do this easily, do it with your eyes closed.

    Don't run or play tennis with worn shoes. I changed my last pair of running shoes after 360 miles (I keep track of mileage on shoes). Note the wear on your tennis shoes to determine when to replace them. If things feel a lot better with new shoes, then you might be using them for too long.

    Wear aftermarket insoles for additional support and cushioning. I use New Balance Ultra-Arch Insoles but many others like Superfeet.

    > *Tennis elbow is coming back: I feel a little bit of pain on my
    > elbow again. Thus, I am also using a brace. I got back to my soft
    > string and low tension. Icing it and theraband. Hope this goes
    > away. Any other advice?

    Try the Flexbar. Massage the medial and lateral. Stay away from pullups and curls. Have a teaching pro check out your technique - your backhand if it's lateral and your serve and forehand if it's medial.

    Consider a more flexible frame.

    > *Plantar fasciitis: This has been bothering for years. Come and
    > go. Is there any exercise you guys recommend to get rid of this once
    > and for all?

    Stretch your calves every day.
    Use a night splint when it flares up.
    Make sure that you have good cushioning (see above).

    > *More stamina: Lately I feel tired during matches -even on the first
    > set-. Last year I used to play 3 sets without issues. Any
    > recommendation to improve my stamina and get more energy?

    Distance running.
    Losing weight if that's an issue.
    Adequate nutrition before and during a match.
    Hydration.
    Interval training.

    > As you can see I refuse to retire. Love the game so your input is crucial. Thanks.

    I'm in my mid-50s and have had all of these issues. I have no problems playing five sets but I workout a lot to support my tennis.
     
    #4
  5. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    OP,

    Wow, your post could have been written by me. I'm dealing with everything that you have, except tennis elbow.

    My knees aren't as strong as before so basically I'm trying to lose some weight, taking it easy for at least the first 30 minutes of playing but it's difficult because I'm very passion and can't wait to run hard!

    I used to have Plantar fasciitis on the left foot, then it went away quickly. Now I have it on my right foot, been over 1 month already. It feels painful and causes awkward walking after playing but then it gets OK after many hours. I don't know why I can't heal it completely.

    I don't know what to for these ailments except tryiing to lose weight, stretch more before playing, tell my mind to take it easy so it won't drive and crash the body. It's tough cuz I'm quite competitive.

    For plantar fasciitis I roll my foot on a ball when I sit in front of computer.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2014
    #5
  6. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Now that I'm 48, I need to take care to do more off-court work to keep everything in better shape. If I ride a bicycle two or three times a week, I get much better overall stamina and my knees typically remain issue free. By that I mean no soreness or creaking while on the courts OR when I get out of bed the next day.

    I took a pounding this spring when I started pre-season workouts with a local boys high school team I help to coach, but now that I'm back on my bike, I'm feeling a whole lot better. I think that a little running and sprinting away from the courts can also be a plus for better movement, but too much of that can rack up more pounding on my legs. No impact when riding the bike, so that along with a little running on the grass practice fields at the high school have struck a very good balance for me.
     
    #6
  7. Devil_dog

    Devil_dog Semi-Pro

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    Subscribed to this thread. I'm in my mid-40s and very interested to know how the rest of us "old" fellas deal with aches and pain. Thanks.
     
    #7
  8. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    The most important thing, if you're carrying extra weight, is to get rid of it in your 40s as it becomes progressively harder in your 50s and 60s (so I'm told about the 60s). Getting rid of extra weight will give your joints more room to maneuver.

    Stuff like changing your shoes when the cushioning is gone even though the shoes look fine. Hitting the gym to beef up muscles that atrophy that can result in injuries. And watching the nutrition closely.
     
    #8
  9. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    When you have tendon injuries and continue to stress the injured tendons a condition of poorly healed tendon and new tendinitis might occur.

    You should stop playing tennis immediately until you can get a better understanding of what is going on.

    Start by Googling: common tennis injuries
    There are half a dozen comprehensive references that cover 80-90% of the injuries on this forum, including most of yours if you have the most common injuries. You need to see a well qualified Dr for diagnoses.

    Search this forum for the injuries that you list for long recent threads with many references.

    Understand what tendinitis (with inflammation) is and also tendinosis (with defective healing).
    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=442912&highlight=tendon+injury+nuthouse
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2014
    #9
  10. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Did you have plantar fasciitis? Tennis elbow?
     
    #10
  11. sovertennis

    sovertennis Semi-Pro

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    Having had all these ailments at some point (and several surgeries to repair my khee, feet and elbow--successfully), I'd like to add this: get used to some amount of discomfort if you're playing solely on hard courts. To help offset it, follow the advice in the previous posts, especially regarding improving your overall strength and, importantly, flexibility. If you're going to start running, then only run on trails, dirt roads--no pavement. Biking is good (I do a lot of it), but it tends to tighten up the hips and lower back. Someone has advised to make sure you have good shoes. I put those heel cushions in every pair of athletic shoes I own in order to reduce impact.

    I'm I bit older than you and am holding up pretty well, but I've learned that I can't, for example, play two long matched in consecutive days, and that in order to stay healthy for tennis I have to do a lot of cross-training. Good luck.
     
    #11
  12. Ace47

    Ace47 New User

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    I had tennis elbow as well as ganglions in my wrist. Once my elbow healed I was hooked, I bought the wrist cold wrap for my ganglion and the foot wraps for my Mom who had plantar fasciitis.
     
    #12

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