New stringer ... please be gental

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by yourmailman, Apr 29, 2012.

  1. yourmailman

    yourmailman Rookie

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    Originally posted this in the strings forum to get feedback on the string choices. Posting it here now to hopefully get feedbacl on stringing before I actually get started.

    I recently purchased a stringing machine and am getting ready to start stringing my own racquets.

    I have watched countless videos on the web and I think I have the basics down.

    I decided on Gamma Zo for the mains and Dunlop S-Gut for the crosses (both 17 gauge like I use now).

    Has anybody tried this combo?

    Also, before I start on my current playing racquets, I plan on using the strings that came with the stringer for practice.

    Any helpful hints?
     
    #1
  2. COPEY

    COPEY Hall of Fame

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    Not sure what racquets you're stringing, but when you run into a blocked grommet and you have trouble feeding the cross string through, cut the end to as sharp a point as you can, apply a lubricant (I keep a tube of chapstick on my tool tray), then using longnose pliers, force the string through.

    I believe Jim E. recommends using a piece of scrap string in between the string that's blocking the grommet and the frame. In other words, when doing your mains and you're at the point where you're going to be blocking a hole for a cross, place a piece of scrap string in between the main string you're about to tension and the frame. When it's time to feed the cross string through the blocked hole, use the scrap string to pull up (or down) on main string to facilitate easy throughput for the cross. Hopefully that makes sense.
     
    #2
  3. yourmailman

    yourmailman Rookie

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    It does indeed. Thanx for the advice.
     
    #3
  4. tovli

    tovli New User

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    Listen to the hints about using pieces of string (there is plenty extra on the roll, or use some cutout from your racquet), and pay very close attention to using the correct tie-off holes, they will probably already be larger than a non-tie-off hole.

    (I took a lot of extra time trying to get the final tie-off string through the wrong hole, even destroyed the pathfinder awl to accomplish it. The fact that I even needed it (didn't on the other three knots) should have been a hint that I was messing up.)

    My First Stringing:
     
    #4
  5. gmatheis

    gmatheis Hall of Fame

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    Just pay attention to what you are doing and you should have no problems ... stringing really isn't that hard.

    The one thing that i ran into was when I had to tie off through a hole that already had a string going through it. Just cut the string tip at an angle and grip the string with your needle nose pliers about 1/8" to 1/4" from the tip in order to push it through.
     
    #5
  6. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

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    I believe Zo is a co-poly. That may be a real pain for a first time stringer.
     
    #6
  7. yourmailman

    yourmailman Rookie

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    Yeah, that's why I am going to practice first before I use the co-poly.
     
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  8. gilly2571

    gilly2571 Guest

    Practice with a very cheap natural gut. When you are done, know that you have just completed the toughest job there is and it can only get easier. (That is if you didn't break the string, bend it over, have it slip in the clamps, etc.)
     
    #8
  9. yem

    yem New User

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    My first bit of advice(i post this every time)is to invest in a starting clamp. They are so useful.

    Learn the pro or Parnell knot to tie off, they are much easier after you learn them.

    Make sure you weave one cross ahead, it will make it much easier to weave the crosses and it also makes it easier to catch mis weaves.

    Straighten crosses as you string, straighten the one you previously tensioned(example, you have just tensioned the 4th cross. When you release the clamp to move it to the next string, straighten the 3rd string).

    If you have a drop weight, be ready to adjust the starting angle based on how much a string can stretch. For a poly like Zo, the bar should be angled at least in the 2-3 o'clock position.


    Have fun and good luck!
     
    #9
  10. Wuppy

    Wuppy Professional

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    yeah get a starting clamp. I don't have one and starting is a nightmare.
     
    #10
  11. tyu1314

    tyu1314 Semi-Pro

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    Mistakes i made when i first started:
    -misweave cross
    -broke the knot by tension it
    -skip the wrong hole
    -flying clamp came off

    Only preweave one cross. I made a silly mistake when i strung my fourth or fifth racquet, i preweave the all the crossess, and it is really painful to pull the string through the main.:shock:
     
    #11
  12. Smasher08

    Smasher08 Hall of Fame

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    Agreed that starting clamps are very, very useful:

    - For tying knots
    - For bridging
    - For starting mains and crosses
    - For reducing the number of knots you need to learn to one

    My worst and most consistent mistake at first was misweaving crosses. Took about 4 stringjobs to get it right!

    I also find a String Thing pretty useful for straightening out your newly-strung crosses.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2012
    #12

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