New to tennis; new to strings

Discussion in 'Strings' started by i_need_rice, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. i_need_rice

    i_need_rice New User

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    Hi I've been playing tennis for a year or two now but just started getting into competetive tennis now. I need a new racquet and I've already decided on one (Prince Ignite Team) but I don't any idea about strings.

    I'm a freshmen in high school and I'm 5'0, 103 lbs, so I'm not gonna be breaking strings often. What string will last me about 4 months that will keep tension?

    Also could someone explain how long each string types last? Like polys, multi, synthetic, natural gut, etc.
     
    #1
  2. TearSNFX

    TearSNFX Rookie

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    My advice to you is buy cheap strings and try different mixes and tensions.

    I usually have my students use a nylon string that costs 16 bux by Forten to find out what tension they are comfortable with before I start experimenting on string mixes. No complaints so far with my process of narrowing down what works for them.

    I have found that younger students prefer 52~55 range / high school 55 ~ 58 range / and college students tend to be all over the place. I string racquets as low as 38 and as high as 72 for this crowd.
     
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  3. coyfish

    coyfish Hall of Fame

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    16 dollar string isn't cheap lol. . .

    To the OP:

    I would get a decent multifilament or synthetic gut. You could even do natural gut if you are willing to spend that much but at your level I don't think its worth it (assuming your low level since your just buying a racquet). Either of those will keep tension and last a good while

    Poly lasts longer but it goes dead (loses tension) after a little while and its geared for string breakers or more advanced hitters looking for lots of control.

    Most beginners choose a basic synthetic gut and string it in the middle of their recommended string tension (on your racquet).
     
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  4. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    Last edited: Jan 24, 2010
    #4
  5. obnoxious2

    obnoxious2 Semi-Pro

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    nylon = big nono. Go with a nice multifilament strung in the high 50s or low 60s to get better control.
     
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  6. Jonny S&V

    Jonny S&V Hall of Fame

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    I personally don't mind nylon, it's a great string that doesn't give you anything but doesn't hurt you either. If you don't have a string preference, I would recommend this.
     
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  7. armsty

    armsty Hall of Fame

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    Kevlar for sure.
     
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  8. coyfish

    coyfish Hall of Fame

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    #8
  9. i_need_rice

    i_need_rice New User

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    Thanks for all the responses guys.

    I think since I'm still a beginner that I don't want to be spending so much on natural gut. So I'm gonna get a multifilament.

    A couple of questions...
    1) How are the colored ones compared to non colored? Like the Head RIP Control 17 Black.
    2) If I played about 5 hours a week, how often should I replace strings?
     
    #9
  10. i_need_rice

    i_need_rice New User

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    #10
  11. coyfish

    coyfish Hall of Fame

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    With a multi you don't really need to replace them until they break.
     
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  12. rain-

    rain- New User

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    Would that be the same case as using a poly?
     
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  13. coyfish

    coyfish Hall of Fame

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    Poly is usually thick / strong. As I mentioned its geared for big hitters looking for durability and control. The bad about poly is that it has less feel and goes dead fast. It can also be hard on the elbow. So for a lower level player it doesn't make sense to use it.

    It depends on your level / style on how fast you break strings. Im a 4.5 and I will break a full bed of multifilament in 3-5 hours. I hit hard with heavy spin so I use poly so I don't need to restring my racquet everytime I play. If you don't hit that hard yet then you don't have to worry about breaking strings. I just assumed your were lower level since you are just buying a racquet. Please correct me if im wrong.


    Just go ahead and string with a middle priced multi or syn gut and you will be happy. I wouldn't go overboard analyzing.
     
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  14. GPB

    GPB Professional

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    As a beginner, just use some basic synthetic gut (or cheap multifilament) strings... DO NOT use poly, and don't spend a ton of money on your strings, either.

    Save your money now and work on your game!
     
    #14

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