New to USTA

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by Dasol, Oct 23, 2012.

  1. Dasol

    Dasol Rookie

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    Hi,

    I am totally new to USTA, since I am from Korea. I am thinking about signing for USTA because I am looking for a team or people that I can play with.

    I am wondering how the procedure would be if I sign up for the membership. When I sign up and pay the money, then does someone contact me to find a team? Also, what is NTRP? If I say I am a 3.5 player, then a team which consists of 3.5 players would contact me?

    Sorry for this basic questions, but please understand I am totally new for this, and I appreciate your help in advance!!:)

    Thanks!
     
    #1
  2. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    If you want to play USTA league matches, join the USTA. If you just want to find people to play with, there are many websites for it.

    Nobody will contact you just because you joined the USTA. You need to find out what leagues are in your area (USTA website can help with that) and try to get into the teams.
     
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  3. michael_1265

    michael_1265 Professional

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    You need to find out how your area USTA is organized, and that will give you a good idea on where to start. You will probably be looking to get on a spring men's team.

    Here is how it is set up in my area:
    http://www.richmondtennisleagues.com/

    Where do you live?
     
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  4. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    I think a better bet for you at this point is to visit your local tennis club and inquire about club league play. You will have a lot of fun and advance your game. That's where you will meet people who ALSO play on USTA teams and you might get recruited that way. That was my path, anyway.
     
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  5. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    I also vote for joining a local tennis club. It's hard to navigate USTA without help from someone who's already in the organization. It's not a user-friendly system and it takes a couple of seasons of play in order to really adjust to the grind.
     
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  6. tennis24x7

    tennis24x7 New User

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    Do not Join USTA.

    They don't do anything and pay millions of dollars to no good people like Patrick McEnroe who is just riding the coat tails of his brother. I can't believe he is being paid a million dollars a year for nothing, I am sure his brother would say "You cannot be serious":twisted:
    Save your $ and join a local non USTA league.
     
    #6
  7. goober

    goober Legend

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    You have to find out what the tennis situation is in the area you move to. USTA may or may not be big there and other tennis venues may be more popular.

    First thing to do when you get to your new place is scope all the local tennis centers and check out what leagues and clubs are available. Contact your USTA league cordinator to tell them you are interested. Go the USTA website and see what leagues/teams/flex leagues have been playing in your area. See how active the leagues are and how far you may have to drive to play matches. You could check out websites like tennis meetup and tennisopolis, but those tend to be mostly casual players.
     
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  8. Spokewench

    Spokewench Semi-Pro

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    I do not know where you live; but what you need to do is find out if there are leagues in your area. Go to the USTA website www.usta.com; go to tennislink area; find out what district your town is located in; look up the contact information for the league coordinator of that district. Contact the league coordinator either by email or telephone and ask them if there are leagues in your area, that you are looking for a team, what level you think you are; and they will help you find a team; then you will need help to self rate yourself. Sometimes it is hard to find you a team as a league coordinator because they cannot make a captain take you as a team member, but they can help get you started in the right direction. Don't give up and be persistent if you don't get on a team right away.
     
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  9. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    You will get Tennis mag and Inside Tennis mag for free (well, I am not sure why I get the second one). And local chapter newsletters.
     
    #9
  10. Dasol

    Dasol Rookie

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    Thanks guys!!

    It is more complicating than I thought, and I am not sure whether it would be easier to find a hitting partner than to join the USTA.

    I am living in Princeton, NJ, and I think there are several local clubs where people get lessons and play leagues. Are those clubs related to the USTA?

    So, the first thing I can do is to join the USTA and to find a local coordinator who can help me navigate which team I can join, right?

    Is it also possible that I cannot find a team though I pay for the membership?

    Thanks!
     
    #10
  11. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    Anyone here from Princeton, NJ who can help point him in the right direction?
     
    #11
  12. OHBH

    OHBH Semi-Pro

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    #12
  13. OHBH

    OHBH Semi-Pro

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    #13
  14. CHOcobo

    CHOcobo Professional

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    If you're just looking for someone to play with, don't join the USTA for that. There's few websites that are pretty active with people looking for people to play. I'm also looking for someone to hit with and I found many many site for people like us but 90% of the sites are very inactive or people that just don't reply. I very doubt your in MN. lol.
     
    #14
  15. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    My recommendation:

    1) find a team
    2) practice with the team
    3) if you like practicing with the team, join USTA

    If you get to #3 and don't like practicing with them...repeat 1 & 2.
     
    #15
  16. Dasol

    Dasol Rookie

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    Ok,
    So, to find a team, I should first visit a local club here, right? And which websites for finding a hitting partner are active?
     
    #16
  17. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    I think you need to pursue two separate tracks.

    First, call your local club(s). Ask about playing opportunities: ladders, club teams, clinics, etc. Ask about costs and whether membership is required.

    Second, contact your local USTA league coordinator. I suspect someone here can give you the link. Ask about when the USTA league seasons begin and what they cost. See if they have a list of available players you can get on, or if they can give your name to captains who need players.

    Then decide based on your time, budget, interests.
     
    #17
  18. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    tennisopolis, meetup, craigslist
     
    #18
  19. ian2

    ian2 Semi-Pro

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    Dasol, USTA is great if there is an active USTA league scene in Princeton, and if structured organized competition is what you are looking for. But I'd suggest that you first scout local public tennis courts and find players at your level to hit with. Or join a club if you can afford it. Either way, this would allow you to jump into the local tennis scene immediately, and eventually decide whether joining USTA is even worth it. This is not to discourage you - personally, I love USTA and had been playing USTA leagues and captaining for years (in Colorado).

    Out of curiosity I looked up ptp.org site that another poster suggested, and found this gem... pretty hilarious in my opinion. Good to know that at 4.0 I'm a tennis semi-god. On the flip side, at 3.5 "minor technical changes are possible" but at 4.0 "it is too late for major technical changes in game". LOL.

    Adult Skill Levels

    BEGINNERS I:For players new to the game. You learn about groundstrokes, volleys and serves from our certified instructors. This is the best way to learn about the game of tennis with instructor intensive lessons.

    BEGINNERS II:For players new to the game, but may have taken the lessons in the past or even the last session. This level will offer you an extreme amount of instruction of the basics to get you to a level where you can begin to play games.

    ADV. BEGINNERS: For players who have general knowledge of grips and strokes but are still struggling to hit the ball with consistency. The instructor's lesson plan will include all strokes that give you a better grasp of rallying and playing points. The goal here is to have you playing at a consistent level with friends and family.

    INTERMEDIATE: (3.0) For players who have demonstrated a more consistent stroke and knows basic game strategies. Instructors work on stroke confidence and hitting for direction, spin and pace.

    ADVANCED: (3.5 & above) Player has very consistent match play experience. Instructor passes along strategy and court positioning tips. Also works on how to understand and utilize strengths and court position. Must be physically ready for a great workout.

    Sp ADV (3.5): This player has been approved (by try-out) to be in this level. Player has aggressive and consistent match play experience. While their strokes are strong, minor technical changes are possible along with strategy tips and how to exploit opponent's weaknesses. Must be physically ready for a great workout.

    Sp ADV (4.0): This player has been approved (by try-out) to be in this level. Player has very aggressive and consistent match play experience. It is too late for major technical changes in game, but still looking for strategy tips and how to exploit opponent's weaknesses. Must be physically ready for a great workout.
     
    #19
  20. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    Short answer, join the USTA, if and only if you are going to be joining a USTA team/league. It is quite easy to do and can be done on short notice. Don't join it until someone tells you you need to.
     
    #20
  21. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    One of my longest running hitting partners is a guy I met thru Craigslist. Coincidentally he lived 1 neighborhood down from me and we play once a week. He plays no usta, but likes a match or two a week for fun.

    I also found a team by playing a tournament for fun and met some nice people that way.

    Found a team right when I moved by just showing up at the public courts and hitting the ball machine. Asked the pro how many players play at my level. Got in touch with them via email.

    Infinite number of ways to meet people.
     
    #21

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