New wood and graphite racquet from Lacoste

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by goran_ace, Jun 3, 2011.

  1. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    Check it out on the Lacoste Tennis FB page:

    https://www.facebook.com/lacoste.tennis

    gorgeous racket. I'd like to have one on my collection just to look and maybe give it a quick hit here or there, but probably $$$$$ and not something you'd really want to use everyday.

    here are the specs

    weight 320 G
    headsize 630 cm^2
    balance 33.00 cm
    rigidity 70RA (wow. really that stiff for wood + graph?)
    string pattern 20 x 16 (they have their numbers reversed for M's and X's)
     
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  2. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat Legend

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    I wonder how it can be wood/graphite and be so stiff and light. Also I have never seen a wood/graphite racquet with grommet strips before.

    I wonder if there is any real wood in that racquet and it not just fake simulated wood done by paint like on the Jack Kramer millenium edition.
     
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  3. SFrazeur

    SFrazeur Legend

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    Funny. A wood/graphite racquet to commemorate René Lacoste, the inventor of the T-2000.

    -SF
     
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  4. SFrazeur

    SFrazeur Legend

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    ProKennex had the "Core" racquets with a wooden core running in the hoop. Wonder if it could be a similar thing?

    -SF
     
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  5. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat Legend

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    Yeah, they had a strip of ash. Snauwaert's composite graphite racquets also had a strip of Ash running through the whole frame.
     
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  6. Buckethead

    Buckethead Banned

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    VS, today I saw this Prince Woddie racket, really pretty over size and heavy, do you know anything about it??

    Also, can you post any links or break down about the construction tech of the Dunlop max IMF?
     
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  7. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat Legend

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    The Prince Woodie is about 100sq.in. Made up of Ash and Maple reinforced with multiple graphite inlays and graphite overlays. came out in about 1980. Was very popular there for a few years.

    The Dunlop Injection Molding process was:
    First there is a casting of a low melting point alloy core that is in the shape of the racquet. The alloy core is then put in the injection molding machine. A Compound of GRAPHITE and NYLON is Melted and then injected around the alloy core. Once the graphite and Nylon is cooled the Alloy core is heated up so it melts and then poured out of the frame. This leaves individual string holes that have pillars inside the frame. There are no holes drilled in these injection molded frames by Dunlop. The manufacturing for IMF racquets was exclusively done by Dunlop in their factory in England from 1980-1992.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2011
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  8. Buckethead

    Buckethead Banned

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    Interesting way to make rackets from what I have seen in videos these days.

    What are the pros and cons of this method?

    I read at TW that the sheets of graphite/epoxy are hand formed (would mixed be a correct word in this case?).

    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Reviews/MW200G/MW200GReview.html

    Why was the factory shut down??

    Thank you.
     
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  9. vsbabolat

    vsbabolat Legend

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    Pros and cons of Injection Molding?

    In Injection Molding you have Graphite and nylon chips that are melted and Injection around the alloy core.

    There are few inaccuracies in that article. The first Injection Molded Frame was the Max150G. A standard size frame that came out in 1981. The Max200G came out in 1982 which was the midsize version.

    The factory shut down because the Injection Molding Frame were discontinued. The cost of producing IMF racquets became too costly do to the Health and Safety Laws of the U.K so I was told. Also with the IMF racquets you could not get the combination of lightness and large head size 95sq.in. Dunlop did try a couple of IMF in 95 head size frames with the Max800i and Max500i. I remember the Max500i being really heavy. Maybe it would work today with today's carbon fiber in the larger head size
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2011
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  10. dje31

    dje31 Semi-Pro

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    I've personally lobbied for the return of wood to tennis racquets in the past, not necessarily as the primary material, but as part of the mix.

    Tons of ski manufacturers today find it to be a viable / useful component in use with modern material and composite design. Given that numerous tennis MFRs are also involved in skiing---Head, Volkl, Kneissl, Fischer, Rossignol (in the past), Wilson/Atomic---it seems logical to reconsider its use in modern tennis racquet design.

    PK dabbled in it a few years ago with the Core lineup. Strange / ironic that Lacoste would be the one to reintroduce its use...but kudos to them for doing so. I know I'm intrigued, and hope others follow suit.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2011
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  11. dje31

    dje31 Semi-Pro

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    Heck, you could probably use balsa wood as the core, which is lightweight, flexible, easily renewable, grows relatively quickly, and is the softest of the hardwoods. There's your built-in vibration damping, probably as light or lighter than the foam cores of old.

    Wrap your nano-tube graphite matrix around that balsa core and Bob's yer uncle!

    It's been part of sandwich construction for decades now. Thanks, wikipedia!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ochroma_pyramidale

    Admittedly, spruce, ash and sitka are/were the more common wood cores used in ski construction.
     
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  12. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Well, I don't know about all these wood composites...tough to get the raw materials. Wood doesn't grow on TREES, ya know! ;)
     
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  13. mctennis

    mctennis Hall of Fame

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    I don't and won't have a facebook account so the info wasn't available to look at with this link.
     
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  14. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    What, you don't want another internet addiction?! ;)

    -Fuji
     
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  15. mctennis

    mctennis Hall of Fame

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    Nope, I'm not 14 years old.
     
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  16. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    Don't worry too much about it, your not missing much! :)

    -Fuji
     
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  17. mctennis

    mctennis Hall of Fame

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    That's what I figured. Just something else to waste time on.
     
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  18. Rorsach

    Rorsach Hall of Fame

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    Here's the pics:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  19. Rorsach

    Rorsach Hall of Fame

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    And some more:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Apparently it's going to be "commercialised" in 2012.
     
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  20. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    ProKennex Core1 No. 22 TW Racquet Review


    Has racquet technology come full circle? We've gone from wood to aluminum to graphite and now...back to wood? Well, sort of. While Pro Kennex's newest racquets incorporate a wood "spine" around the hoop, the wood is fused with carbon graphite in an attempt to combine the best features of wood and graphite. By not extending the wood spine to the edge of the racquet, two independent graphite cylinders are created, one on each side of the spine. This is done to provide a more natural feel, while dampening vibration. According to Pro Kennex, "when you strike a ball with a Core1 racquet each of the independent graphite cylinders creates a separate, opposing shock wave. When these two opposing shock waves meet at the wood spine they counteract or cancel each other, eliminating all of the harsh negative impact shock and vibration. The wood spine then transmits only the remaining clean, responsive, organic feel to your hand. It's lightweight power with feel!" This should appeal to traditionalists trying to re-capture the benefits (and glory?) of wood in a graphite world.

    The first generation of Core1 racquets consists of the No. 22 and No. 24. Both are game-improvement models designed for beginners and intermediates. The Core1 No. 22 is 29 mm wide and has a 115 square inch head. The No. 24 is 31 mm wide and has a 120 square inch head. Both racquets are 27.5 inches long and feature a wood-grain cosmetic to play up the wood beneath the graphite. We playtested the Core1 No. 22 for two weeks and have these observations.

    Groundstrokes

    Despite weighing only 9.3 ounces, the Core1 No. 22 has a medium swingweight of 324, giving it good heft from the baseline. Gran begins, "the Core1 No. 22 was a pleasant surprise. From the first groundstroke, I was very comfortable with this oversize plus racquet. I attribute that comfort to a good balance to weight ratio. It's maneuverable, yet does not sacrifice power, which is unusual for a sub-10 ounce racquet. It really is easier (less effort) when playing with a racquet that does in fact generate some power for you. Eileen offers, "when hitting practice groundstrokes, or when I had enough time to set up during a match, I really enjoyed this racquet from the baseline. Under pressure, it felt a bit heavy and I had a few problems getting it around. It provided a nice combination of power and control and had a nice, solid feel. I could have perhaps used a little more power."

    Dan says, "the first thing that caught my attention was the generous sweetspot offered by the Core1 No. 22. It has a firm feel throughout the stringbed, including the top but doesn't have that empty, hollow feeling provided by most light, widebody racquets. Players with shorter or medium swings will have best results with this racquet. When I took a full swing, the ball rarely stayed in the court. However, this racquet provides more than adequate spin control and I was able to generate excellent slice and topspin. Mark continues, "this was the stiffest wood racquet I've ever hit with; the most powerful, too. During baseline rallies I was afraid to hit out with it and needed to apply substantial spin to keep the ball in court. Fortunately, the open string pattern allows for good spin. Unfortunately, the frame is very wide (29 mm) and I frequently "framed" the ball when trying to apply spin."

    John comments, "I found the Core1 No. 22 to be very stiff, moderately lightweight and extremely powerful. I had no problem generating more power than usual and surprising topspin thanks to the open string pattern. Although I couldn't actually feel the wood core, I was impressed with the racquet's damping properties. It was relatively shock and vibration free. Don adds, "I found less power than expected, possibly due to the racquet's light weight. With my medium-fast swing, I was able to keep the ball within the lines by applying moderate topspin or slice. I really enjoyed hitting slice backhands with this racquet. It had a solid feel for being a stiff, widebody racquet." Drew offers, "An abundance of power - this racquet was obviously built for players with slower swing speeds than I have. I could rocket my groundstrokes, but getting them to touch down in bounds required spin and hitting lower over the net. I hit some great winners but had my share of fence-rattling errors. The Core1 No. 22 stood out on slices - I could impart tremendous underspin. Someone who thrives on hitting funky spins could have some fun with this racquet."
     
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  21. 000KFACTOR90000

    000KFACTOR90000 Professional

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    hope its got a really thin beam. my favourite graphite/wood composite is also the one with the thinnest beam, works really well with poly
     
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  22. Praetorian

    Praetorian Professional

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    I love it. It is so non-cookie cutter, that I need one just for collecting. I hope it plays well, as it would be a bonus.
     
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  23. mctennis

    mctennis Hall of Fame

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    I hit with the Core racquets and thought they were duds. Interesting theory and concept but nothing I'd be willing to use. At least with the PK brand. If Lacoste comes out with one in 2012 I'll be glad to try it out. maybe they've come up with a better hitting/feel to the wood composite racquet. It does look nice though. I just hope it isn't crazy expensive either. That will surely kill its sales. Anything Lacoste comes out with is expensive IMO.
     
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  24. dje31

    dje31 Semi-Pro

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    I think it would take one of the big guys, esp. the ski folks, to pull this off in the way it could/should. It's not that far removed from what Volkl is doing w/Organix, which is cellulose (wood pulp/fiber/leftovers) based.

    I'd guess that the cellulose is easier to work with than a true spine or laminate application.
     
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  25. michael_1265

    michael_1265 Professional

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    +1
    It does seem a little odd
     
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  26. dje31

    dje31 Semi-Pro

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    The paintjob reminds me of the Adidas Stan Smith shoes...mostly white, with green trim.
     
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  27. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    You have to give Pro Kennex a lot of credit. When everyone else was making stiffer and lighter, PK was making frames that were easy on the arm. Maybe they were a generation ahead of their time.
     
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  28. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    the cosmetics is superb. anyone know how much it will cost?
     
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  29. mctennis

    mctennis Hall of Fame

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    I just wish they played better. Great idea though and I agree with you. Maybe they are way ahead of their time.
     
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  30. galain

    galain Hall of Fame

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    I thought the Core 1 #6 was the best racquet I had hit with for a long time. I really found it a different (in a very positive way) feel.
     
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  31. classic tennis

    classic tennis Semi-Pro

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    This prototype is odds on to be from Kunnan.
     
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