NFL in London?

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by MEAC_ALLAMERICAN, Oct 16, 2007.

  1. MEAC_ALLAMERICAN

    MEAC_ALLAMERICAN Legend

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    Are you serious?

    Is the NFL that popular in Europe? :confused:
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    NFL commissioner says Super Bowl may someday be held in London

    By CHRIS KAHN, Associated Press Writer
    October 15, 2007

    SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) -- A future Super Bowl champion may someday be crowned overseas in a game witnessed predominantly by a foreign audience, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said.

    "There's a great deal of interest in holding a Super Bowl in London," Goodell told reporters Monday. "So we'll be looking at that."




    The commissioner said London's new Wembley Stadium would make a great candidate for pro football's biggest matchup, given the enthusiasm overseas for the game.

    The NFL has been expanding its overseas presence for years by televising games around the world. It's held preseason games in numerous countries in Europe, Asia, Mexico and Canada, and in 2005, the Arizona Cardinals and San Francisco 49ers played the first regular-season match outside the United States.

    The game at Azteca Stadium in Mexico City drew the league's largest crowd to date, 103,467.

    On Oct. 28, Wembley will host the first regular-season NFL game outside North America. It took just 90 minutes to sell the first 40,000 tickets for the game between the Miami Dolphins and New York Giants. Goodell said event organizers have sold 95,000 tickets in all.

    Goodell spoke about the possibility of a British Super Bowl after a luncheon Monday in Scottsdale sponsored by the host committee for the 2008 Super Bowl in Arizona.

    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/newthread.php?do=newthread&f=21
     
    #1
  2. HyperHorse

    HyperHorse Banned

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    This is some kind of joke, right?
     
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  3. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    No it's real.

    I don't really get it though as I don't think i've met a single person who likes American football, what's the point in bringing it to England?

    Wembley is an amazing arena tha could be filled 3 times over for the FA Cup final but I have no idea who would want to go and see the Super Bowl (other than Americans).

    Very strange.
     
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  4. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    Why not?? Baseball was a mystery to the Japanese when it first appeared there and is now their most popular game. Basketball emigrated from the USA and is now extremely popular in Asia and Europe, where there are professional leagues. Makes perfect sense for the NFL to do the same.
     
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  5. goober

    goober Legend

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    NFL Europe was a bust. They supported that for like 15 years even though they were losing money every year. $30 million in the last year. UK had two teams both of which folded or moved.

    I just don't American football will ever be big outside of America. It is hard to understand the game.

    Many countries already have sports that are somewhat similar such Rugby.
     
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  6. forzainter

    forzainter Semi-Pro

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    My dad is a HUGE NFL fan, ehs watched like 2 games ecery Sunday in NFL season for the last 16 years or something
     
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  7. Fedexeon

    Fedexeon Hall of Fame

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    People outside of America actually care about NFL?
     
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  8. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, but professional baseball in Japan was established before WW2. The NFL is in a weird situation where it dominates the domestic market, but it hasn't been successful in the international market. Whereas basketball's popularity in America has faded (now behind even NASCAR), but its popularity still proliferates the rest of the world.

    I think the problem is product differentiation. When I watch rugby, I naturally compare it to football. The opposite is true in Europe, and it makes it difficult for football to look like anything but "rugby with fat, steroidal guys and weird, constrictive uniforms" to a rugby audience. I suppose baseball and cricket have somewhat the same relationship.

    Just seems odd to me, I guess, especially since the culture that most matches the vibe of a soccer match is college football, especially college football in the ******* and south.
     
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  9. calvero

    calvero New User

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    does anyone know the prices for tickets? NFL is pretty pricey here, wonder if they reduced it in order to draw a bigger crowd.

    What is the seating capacity for Wembley? anyone know what the expected turnout is on Sunday? if 95,000 show up that will be more than any game in the US has drawn(not sure if any NFL stadium can fit 95,000?)
     
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  10. Fee

    Fee Legend

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    Yay, Miami gets to suck in an entirely different country! Woo hoo.
     
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  11. origmarm

    origmarm Hall of Fame

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    Funny article:

    MIAMI—While preparing for their upcoming game in London against the New York Giants, the struggling Miami Dolphins spent most of the week's practices trying to answer questions concerning differences in the football itself, whether the gaps in a British line were numbered backwards, and whether or not England has end zones. "All right…I know when you cross the Atlantic that the strong side is the weak side and weak side is the strong side, so you drive down the opposite side of the field," said Dolphins quarterback Cleo Lemon, who confessed he was concerned about the team's two-minute drill since he was not sure of the length of the British minute. "But, if I'm right-handed, I don't have to throw with my left, do I? And how do we get first downs since they don't have yards over there? I knew I should have watched NFL Europe when it was still on." Lemon added that he was worried that the ball would spiral in the opposite direction in England, although the coaches had reassured him he was thinking of Australia

    http://www.theonion.com/content/news_briefs/miami_dolphins_wonder_if

    Game is sold out btw, lots of people I know going
     
    #11
  12. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    Basketball has not declined in popularity in the US. One has to realize that the stagnation in popularity of pro basketball has been more than offset by the huge growth of the college game. College basketball is all over the various networks during the long season. One has to look at the sport as a whole.
     
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  13. origmarm

    origmarm Hall of Fame

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    Its 90,000 and it is sold out.

    They are running now (i.e. being resold at) between £70 and £180 so double that for USD. Got some for a client today at 85 for ok seats.

    Can't believe it sold out, thought it would be half empty
     
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  14. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    There's no such thing as bad seats at Wembley!

    I was right at the back for the Community Shield and they were great, would of been even better though if we could learn how to take penalties ;)
     
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  15. Dedans Penthouse

    Dedans Penthouse Hall of Fame

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    First off, what team would want to essentially forfeit a "home game" (Miami in this case) by moving it to a neutral site? That said, I heard that Wembley Stadium (apprx. 90,000) is sold out and that requests were on a level to sell out the game "10 or 11 times over" according to both uk.reuters and eurosport. Unfortunately, this NFL match-up looks like a 'dog' on paper and on top of that, Miami (0-7) lost one of their few stars on offense, running back Ronnie Brown, and Zack Thomas from their defense.

    I understand where your coming from with your "from the rugby afficianado's viewpoint" observation regarding "fat, steroidal guys in restrictive uniforms" but there is a method to that particular form of "fat guy" madness: "fat guys" by and large are the behemoths of the interior line (esp. offensive linemen and "nose guards" in a 3-4 defensive alignment), and given the fact that they play exclusively "IN THE TRENCH," they are not only wide-bodied (shoulder-to-shoulder), but their 'thickness' (chest-to-back) is condusive to absorbing the pounding that they have to absorb on EVERY PLAY. They're sort of like Sumo wrestlers--"fat" in appearance, but still, highly agile athletes. As for those uniforms, NFL football is played at a blinding speed--what if they played without (padded) uniforms? They'd get killed. Think of it this way: if wearing "no pads" would give a player a further "speed" advantage, why then wouldn't NFL players eschew pads altogether??....is it because they're a bunch of pansies??? LOL. As it is, a number of players (who wore pads) unfortuntely are now "living" in wheelchairs, having been paralized playing the game and absorbing a 'blinding' *and crippling* hit.

    The following is NO knock on rugby, a great game in it's own right, but its form of "flow" is largely horizontal (what with the lateralling of the ball VS. the forward pass) and even though you see some brutally tough (and courageous) play in rugby, you do not see the full-speed "from-opposite-direction" HEAD-ON collisions that you see in the NFL. Yes you'll see head-on collisions in rugby but it is usually at close quarters---more of a "thud" than a "SPLAT!" (ouch!). In the NFL you can sometimes see two players with world-class sprinter speed gathering up speed over a greater distance and colliding head on--again, think of the "head-on" involved in the forward pass where you have a pass receiver running a "slant" pattern over the middle versus the free safety who is lying in wait and who "breaks" on the ball--"arriving" just as the ball hits the receiver. These guys are beyond fearless....padding or not. If you've ever played football, you'd have experienced one time or another the "white flash" (when your brain short-circuits for a nano-second because of a hit) or a "stinger" (your 'nerve-endings' go on the blink after a hit). You want to talk about collisions??? think of the kickoff: why (again, if you've ever played football), is it referred to as "the suicide squad?"

    The "fat-guys-in-leotards" stereotypes aside, I'd like to see Chicago Bears kick-returner and pass-receiver Devin Hester flying down a rugby field. I suspect that one or two of his pursuers would get a nasty "wind burn" as he flew by them--and why not?--it's happened many times in the NFL. Again, to get back to those "fat guy" NFL types: to label NFL players across-the-board as "fat guys" would of course be a silly oversimplification, especially considering the blinding speed that is required to play many of the skill positions. Rugby players are called upon to perform more "all-around" tasks, (running, tackling, etc.) whereas the NFL brand of football is a very highly specialized game; i.e. players are suited (and built) for specific tasks, so it stands to reason that you're going to have a much wider (no pun intended) VARIETY of "body types" in the NFL vis-a-vis rugby. And as a result of "specialization" in NFL football, the offensive schemes in the NFL are very complex as are the defensive schemes designed to negate them. It is a mini game of war; a brutal game of chess.

    It is football.

    And football is life.

    'G'-men = 34; Fish = 13


    (desends from soapbox to a mixed chorus of indiffernce and boos from the local Chelsea and Arsenal fans) :razz:
     
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  16. Moose Malloy

    Moose Malloy Legend

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    What TV Network is covering it in England? Who are the commentators? I'm pretty shocked by the interest, maybe its not such a bad idea to have the Superbowl there, except for the time difference difficulties.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2007
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  17. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    It's Sky, not sure who the commentators are. I think they usually just have the American tv ones commentating on the game and Kevin Cadle in the studio talking to guests in the intervals.

    On Sunday we have .. Liverpool v Arsenal, Barcelona v Almeria and then Sevilla v Valencia! All back to back. Oh and the Basel final so I won't be watching the NFL but it does seem to be alot more popular than I thought it was over here.
     
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  18. jt2007

    jt2007 New User

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    not only can miami go 0-16, they can go 0-16 while losing on 2 seperate continents!on both sides of the atlantic:D

    if this happens I may boycott the nfl.
     
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  19. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Ironic considering it's a "national" league. Sure there are Canadian teams in some leagues, but those are teams. England has no NFL franchises.

    This will do wonders in promoting a one world idea in the minds of viewers. Soon people will accept a one world government. The NFL is just doing its part to destroy the idea of American sovereignty.
     
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  20. tbini87

    tbini87 Hall of Fame

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    didn't they actually sell a good amount of seats over there?
     
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  21. malakas

    malakas Banned

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    I am very suprised that this is sold out.Maybe because it's like a priemere or smth.
    But,apart from England maybe,NFL has no chance to be popular in Europe-where hardly anyone follows even rugby..:rolleyes:
     
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