NTRP 0 to 5 in a year? Is that possible?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Stergios, Mar 2, 2013.

  1. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Hi guys,

    I'm new here and new to tennis. So, I'll introduce my self.

    I've been waving in life for as long as I can remember my self. I can't help it but to try out what comes to mind more than twice. Though I never act impulsively.

    I've been changing hobbies, friends and jobs through out my life. Weirdly enough I was very stable in relationships but that's another story.

    Anyway, in summer of 2012 I was fed up with my job and I started to looking up for a new hobby to have some fun and mentally relax. I tried quite a few things, from rock climbing to skydiving. And then came tennis.
    I really hooked up with the sport and I started to play at least twice a week.

    I'm known for my extremities and tennis wasn't going to be of any difference. To make a long story short, in a few months time I decided to get rid of my current job (at least for a year), move to an apartment of 1/4 of the size and price of my previous one and get my extra time and savings into tennis, for a year.

    After studying the NTRP levels of tennis I had to set a bold goal, right?
    I want to know if it is possible to get to a level of NTRP 5 in just one year of intense training;

    I know it's a long post and a long shot too but I wanted to share it with you and make you feel it as i feel it... More over I would be very humbled to listen to any tips or suggestions you may have.

    Stergios
    ---------------------
    Dream like a child and work like a real athlete in life.
     
    #1
  2. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
    Messages:
    11,055
    Location:
    Stuck in the Matrix somewhere in Santa Clara CA
    Unrealistic. Sorry to burst your bubble but this is not possible. Most players will not even make it to a 3.0 level after 1 year. Most players will never get to a 5.0 in their life. If you are talented, get good instruction/guidance and work hard, 3.5 might be a more realistic goal for 1 year.
     
    #2
  3. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    36,365
    Location:
    East side of San Francisco Bay
    I concur with SA. He is a tennis teaching pro.
    I've been playing for over 29 years.
    To make a solid 3.5 in your first year would be almost too amazing to consider. You can PLAY at 3.5 tournaments, but that doesn't make you a 3.5 level player.
    For most, it takes THREE years of intensive, 4-5 day a week tennis to get there.
    I played 3 years of high school football and basketball. I learned to surf in competitive 1-3A contests within 4 years. I could ski ANY expert run at SquawValley within my 11th day ever of skiing.
    In tennis, with help from several pros, I was able to win only one C, or 3.5 tourney within my third year of 5-6 day a week tennis.
     
    #3
  4. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Hi SystemicAnomaly,

    Thanks for your comment. It really means allot. I don't know why but my heart is pumped up with extra blood as I reed your comments. I just can help it! I need to try this out!

    Although 5 it's just a number to me now, I feel an urge to push it as far as I can get it. At the same time I understand I might not know what I'm talking about...

    I'll try to put together a video of my progress since I started having lessons in December 2012 ...

    Thanks once again :)
     
    #4
  5. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    36,365
    Location:
    East side of San Francisco Bay
    Have you done ANY sports in your life?
    How long did it take to get to "expert" level in them?
    Can you jump onto a motorcycle and ride like the top local experts in 5 years time? NOT EVEN CLOSE.
    Can you grab a basketball and play well in local pickup games? NOPE.
    Can you snag a waterski and expect to compete in the local "expert" class? Well, you can pay the entry, but you would be the laughing stock and dead last.
     
    #5
  6. The Meat

    The Meat Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2012
    Messages:
    1,998
    Rooting for you!

    Just need a lot of hours on court, a good coach correcting you, and match experience to raise levels fast.

    Also, I had a friend who started tennis the spring before the start of the high school tennis season in late fall and he played for hours each day and got to 3rd seed rankings at my high school. Although he was very gifted in terms of athleticism and he was one of the brightest students in my high school.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2013
    #6
  7. millicurie999

    millicurie999 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2011
    Messages:
    402
    Go for it and prove us wrong. Make sure to Youtube it.
     
    #7
  8. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Hi LeeD,

    Owo! You should be very athletic and skilful indeed. I've been snowboarding for a few years in the past and saw many skiers trying to get it right. I also tried surfing last summer and I can say you must be strong and fearless to learn to surf well.

    Three and a half in three years for you? That should add some stress to my expectation I should admit.

    I'll keep you post it on my progress and if you have any tips that can help me stress this goal out I'd like to know them. My main straggle at the moment is concentration and focus in practice. As I'm putting a lot of brain activity :confused: in order to perform as much as possible right. Some times I'm getting mentally exhausted before I sweat! (Ok, thats not absolutely true but you get the idea) :oops:

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts,

    Stergios
     
    #8
  9. tennis ratchet

    tennis ratchet New User

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2013
    Messages:
    71
    if you're pretty athletic and good at other sports, you might be able to make it close to 4.0 in a year. i play with a girl who's pretty close to 4.0 in less than two years, with a lot of coaching, and i think spencer, the tw playtester, is a 4.5 who picked up tennis a couple years ago. trouble is it's not just fitness you have to worry about, but a ton of mental stuff that takes a long time to learn. good luck though!
     
    #9
  10. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Hi millicurie999,

    I'm searching out for videos of the past. Meaning December 2012 :). I already found a clip that I'm trying to learn to serve. I was pretty proud at the moment. Although it looks ridiculous!

    I'll get the camera out on Monday's session and I'll film a few serves as a comparison. In the mean time I'll try to find some clips with the strokes in them.

    Definitely on YouTube for better or for worst :).

    Cheers,

    Stergios
     
    #10
  11. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    36,365
    Location:
    East side of San Francisco Bay
    Snowboarding. I started in '93, at the age of 34. Got 17 days my first year, the same my second, and was staying within 3 seconds at our practice track at DonnerSkiRanch with MikeJacoby and MarkFawcett. One of my friends could almost stay with them, and he had half the snowboarding days as me. The practice track on the N run was 11 turns after a long straight start.
    As I mentioned, I did OK in a few contests my first 4 years of surfing, but my surfing was done mostly in big waves at OceanBeachSanFrancisco, the toughest place to surf in the US.
    But if you're tall, athletic, quick, injury free, can throw a baseball 300' in the air, and jump 40" vertical, with great hand eye coordination, and vision like an eagles, you can expect to WIN a big draw C tourney, or a 3.5 level tourney, by the end of your second year of tennis.
    From there, for most players, it takes more than twice as much practice to make 5.0.
    Oh, I'm from SanFrancisco. My tennis years, one high school varsity No1 WON the Canadian Open women's pro tourney. But the No.3 on the team was not close to my level at the time, a 3.5.
     
    #11
  12. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Hi The Meat,

    Thanks for your supporting words.
    I have a good coach who happens to be a great guy too. Sometimes is overlooked I believe but other than having a good coach, having a good chemistry with him/her is definitely a plus. At least for me.

    I have stopped playing with others as I keep practicing on my strokes. Although I'm about start playing a few matches a week. By the way what your thoughts on playing matches in the early stages of learning? Assuming you're practicing regularly? Others on that?

    Your friend should be very good I understand! And very lucky to pursue his passion in athleticism. When I was in school I was far from a good student. But I developed other attributes later on. And kept being better and better on learning things.

    The Meat, if it happens to meet your friend let him know that there is another crazy guy around :).

    Cheers,

    Stergios
     
    #12
  13. gmatheis

    gmatheis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    1,573
    As someone mentioned most tennis players never even make it to 5.0 in their entire life. so getting there in 1 year is basicly impossible.

    0 to 4.0 in a year is doubtful but possible for someone very athletic with very good hand eye coordination to start with. This would be a goal that is at least in the realm of possibility, just dont be discouraged if you cant do it in one year.
     
    #13
  14. eman resu

    eman resu Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2009
    Messages:
    763
    As you said it yourself, 5.0 is just a number. Go hit the courts and have fun playing tennis.
     
    #14
  15. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Hi TR,

    Luckily I have an athletic structure. Not to the extreme though. But I keep working on my fitness regularly.

    If I'm good at sports? That's a tough question. It's kind of weird the way I'm learning things. I like to fully understand the task and then work on it till perfection. The only thing that might disrupt this process could be boredom of a daunting task. That was also a reason I wanted to go public with this project. As there are great people here and around who know way more on the subject than me and they might can help me stay focused.

    Back to the sports question, I was very good at skateboarding as I spent thousands of hours on these boards. I also motocrossed for around four years.
    My latest sport, Archery, far from extreme. But very precise. I got very good in it. Less than 2 years in the sport I got 7th place in a major competition in the UK. Well, then I stopped. Some action was missing. Although I still love archery. And I'd like to get a hold of a bow sometime in future.

    Is your friend still improving after reaching 4?
    I didn't know that Spencer is new to tennis; Is that true?

    You're are right about the mental skills needed and I'm having some difficulties on that aspect at the moment. But I'm trying to address them.

    Stergios
     
    #15
  16. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Hi Gmatheis,

    Thanks for posting. I can see you're an optimist as well. Although it looks like you've been there and you know it first hand it's tough. But, I had to do it bold. For some reason that goal triggers me enough to get my a** to the gym and stretch out regularly.

    I hope you understand the mentality.

    Cheers,

    Stergios
     
    #16
  17. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Messages:
    36,365
    Location:
    East side of San Francisco Bay
    Motocross good.
    I never got good at it, taking me 6 years and over 300 races to make OpenExpert, and never did in 250's or 125's.
    Average entry fee of 35 bucks for novice races, and 75 for expert races, I must have spent well over 17,000 on entry fee alone.
    Amongst a few of my bikes.... 77 YamahaYZ125, '78 YZ250, '79KX250, '79Husky390, '79YZ490, and that's only my first two years.....
    Made VetPro in 7 races, winning or placing second every time.
    But as you know, the toughest is to get out of 250 novice. That class is crazy, much more wild than 125 or the old fart's Open class.
     
    #17
  18. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Hi ER,

    Thanks for the long sighted motivation. I'll definitely keep that in my mind.

    Stergios
     
    #18
  19. scotus

    scotus Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2005
    Messages:
    7,622
    I know a high school kid who made it from a total beginner to a varsity player in 1 year at a competitive southern California school.

    He had a weekly private lesson with a great coach, a weekly hitting lesson with another coach and another weekly group lesson in addition to learning from his school coach and playing tons of tennis with his teammates.

    So, if you are athletic and have the financial means to invest heavily in tennis, then I would say 0 to 4.0 is definitely within your reach. But if you are not planning on taking lessons, then even reaching 4.0 in a year would be nearly impossible. Heck, you'd have a hard time finding a 4.0 player who would be willing to hit with you.

    Going from 4.0 to 4.5 is a big hurdle and from 4.5 to 5.0 even bigger.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2013
    #19
  20. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2012
    Messages:
    5,301
    Location:
    Garden of Gethsemane
    Okay, what's the difference between a 4.5 and a 5.0? I played both and have beaten them. They just seem like people that can grind longer and better than the other to me.
     
    #20
  21. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,335
    Location:
    On the courts; hard & clay ...
    stergios,

    have you played any racquet sports before? squash?
     
    #21
  22. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    You've spent a fortune on entry fees!
    I was racing the 125 and in the Open category with the 250.
    I was racing Italian TM bikes.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    #22
  23. mhj202

    mhj202 Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2011
    Messages:
    305
    Location:
    New York, NY
    If you need to ask, I'm going to bet you've never actually played a 4.5 or 5.0 and definitely never have beaten one.
     
    #23
  24. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Hi Scotus,

    That's a great success story to begin with.
    I'm having everyday lessons with one of the top coaches currently in my home country. Here is his pro profile and his junior profile here.

    I'll try my best to make it!

    Thanks for your supporting comment.

    Stergios

    PS: Apologies for my previously unrelated to the topic photos posted.
     
    #24
  25. TheCheese

    TheCheese Professional

    Joined:
    May 10, 2012
    Messages:
    954
    Give it a shot and document it and post some videos to see your progress. At the very least, it'd be really interesting to see.
     
    #25
  26. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Messages:
    3,412
    It's not possible to make 5.0 in a year. 5.0's are players who started at a very young age and have a lot of experience in high level competition. Most are former college players who spent 10 years practicing at least 10 hours per week. You just can't make up that many hours in a year.

    That doesn't mean you can't become a good player in a year, however. With a ton of dedication, I think you could become a solid 4.0 in a year. That's nothing to sneeze at, as 80% of recreational tennis players are 4.0 or below, so you'd be toward the top of rec players.

    It would require at least 15 hours on court per week with good coaching and good hitting partners, though.
     
    #26
  27. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Hi Relinquis,

    I've only played table tennis when I was really young. I was obsessed for a summer or two. But moderately good.

    And here is the funny story. When I was about 6 my mom got me a juniors tennis racket and got me in to a group lesson. The only thing I remember was that I almost cried and said I don't want to come back ever! What an irony?

    Last summer I played beach tennis and I really enjoyed it. I wasn't bad at all actually. Good reflexes. That's all of my experiences with racket sports.

    How about you? Did you have any experiences with other racket sports before tennis? Is that of any help to engage in other racket sports? Or can ruin your technique?

    Stergios
     
    #27
  28. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2012
    Messages:
    5,301
    Location:
    Garden of Gethsemane
    Actually yes I have and most of them play the exact same. Numbers don't matter.
     
    #28
  29. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Messages:
    3,412
    Probably true at tournaments because people can enter whatever level they want might have a 3.5 and a 5.0 all in the 4.5 division. League play has a very clear difference, though.
     
    #29
  30. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,110
    If they were different sports I might be more optimistic about your project. Skateboarding, motorcross, and archery - I don't see how they might translate into tennis. Muscle memory takes time. But I'm no expert.

    I do applaud you and your ambition. Regardless of the time factor, I imagine you'll develop into a good player.
     
    #30
  31. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2,361
    I'd say it's not impossible. Go for it OP. I admire your courage and envy your position really.

    You seem to be pretty athletic. That's a good start. And you seem to have a good team. My advice is take the stretching very seriously and it should help you A LOT. Not just simple gym level stretches but trying to get to know how each muscle feel when in use and when it's stretched. And focus on the core and it should take many months to just understand the intricacies of core muscles. And trust me there are many many muscles not being used or underdeveloped (shortened, weak, tight muscles) for most people. And only utmost top level athletes are using close to 100% of their body. and for rec that number is truly dismal.

    Good luck and keep us posted!
     
    #31
  32. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Hi TC,

    Thanks for giving a thump up. It would be really interesting to see if one gives it all in a mature age if it's any possible to reach this goal.

    I'll try to document as much as possible of the process. As I mentioned previously I already have found a few clips of me serving three months ago. I'll record the progress so far by this week. That would be the first document of the process.

    Once again, thanks.

    Stergios
     
    #32
  33. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2012
    Messages:
    5,301
    Location:
    Garden of Gethsemane
    That is true in a League. But leagues have so many issues, that I don't even join those.
     
    #33
  34. Buford T Justice

    Buford T Justice Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2011
    Messages:
    424
    I think I know what you mean by this.

    I am friends with a guy who was the number 1 5.0 in my state a couple of years ago. Being number 1 in the 5.0s means hes really more like a 5.5 I suspect.

    In any case.....When I first hit balls with him I thought "he's going to blow me off this court". The reality is he can beat me easily, but it is not with more pace than me, etc. It is sheer grinding, being a human backboard, placing shots, and never missing. Wow...is that all there is to this game?!?! LOL. Tough stuff....
     
    #34
  35. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2,361
    Any sports at high level can (not will) translate to another sports. The objectives are different but it's using the same body after all. I mean high competition level not just playing.
     
    #35
  36. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2012
    Messages:
    5,301
    Location:
    Garden of Gethsemane
    Exactly, I feel that these players have adopted the playstyles that they see from the professionals from the ATP and WTA which is complete crap to me.

    I can tell you right now is that the HS state champion in my state was a grinder and that's all he and his opponent did the entire. These matches are more boring than Varsity B Girl's Doubles matches... :oops:
     
    #36
  37. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,335
    Location:
    On the courts; hard & clay ...
    I played tennis, squash, table tennis and badminton growing up... but more focus on Tennis. I think if you want to get good, it's better to focus on one. Tennis is teh most fun, as you play outdoors and the girls wear short skirts which is nice. Squash is fun as well, very intense, but not as many people play and it's always indoors.

    the technique is different on all of these sports, but you develop very good hand-eye coordination. that helps in all racquet sports.
     
    #37
  38. luvforty

    luvforty Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,294
    why does a guy in greece care about ntrp
     
    #38
  39. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,110
    When Jordan wanted to make it in Major League Baseball, I recall analysts saying that the muscles most often used in basketball differed from those in baseball. Nobody questions Jordan's athleticism, but even with all his abilities he could only play double-A ball. Not sure how he did in the minors. Was he good?
     
    #39
  40. Buford T Justice

    Buford T Justice Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2011
    Messages:
    424
    Yes...I don't enjoy playing that style either....but it definitely works.
     
    #40
  41. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2012
    Messages:
    5,301
    Location:
    Garden of Gethsemane
    I know the style works, that's why players that are not in ATP/WTA use them.
     
    #41
  42. luvforty

    luvforty Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,294
    ntrp numbering should change.

    in stead of 1-7, they should use bigger number like 1,000,000 to 7,000,000

    so beginners will stop asking - can I reach 5,000,000 in a year.
     
    #42
  43. kimbahpnam

    kimbahpnam Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2007
    Messages:
    2,675
    since there is no 0 rating, it's impossible.
     
    #43
  44. DakotaM

    DakotaM New User

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2013
    Messages:
    46
    I think 5.0 would be unattainable, but 4.0 is reasonable if you work hard enough. I went from 2 months experience and 6 seed at my below average high school team to 4 seed at a D3 college in about a year and a half. I'm about a 4.0 player now. My playing partner is a former D2 player and coaches at a college, and I played with him 5 days a week in order to progress at this rate. In my opinion, immersion is the best way to get better as long as your technique is correct to begin with. Play somebody better than you every single day.
     
    #44
  45. JW10S

    JW10S Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2006
    Messages:
    1,896
    More like 1 to 7,000,000--then maybe they will get it. Even though the NTRP system was supposed to standardize things I'm astounded by how many people are absolutely clueless as to how the system works.
     
    #45
  46. Buford T Justice

    Buford T Justice Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2011
    Messages:
    424
    Yes, for every video we see of someone with beautiful strokes, there are 5 guys out there that look ugly playing, but will kick their butts, sometimes very badly, in a match.

    I know.....I've been beaten many times by them!

    One of my good tennis buds (one of these guys who beats me every time.....) plays this style and is very successful all the way up in UT 6.0-. He is fully prepared to hit 20 balls to win a point and that is on a hard court....never mind clay...youll need a calendar to time the match. If you are not prepared for that, you will start to try and hit winners, which is exactly what this type of player wants you to do, as they are quite certain the odds are in their favor that you cannot blast balls by them consistently. And, they are right. They are playing smart to win (provided they are in shape and fit enough to play sets that take an hour plus each), but it is an unexciting way to play in my opinion. I thought this style of play would peter out by the upper eschelons of rec tennis, but it doesn't. There are many many players who approach the game with this mindset, and again, there are many who are successful with this approach.

    Of course...this is spoken by someone who loses more than wins against this style! LOL
     
    #46
  47. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2010
    Messages:
    6,591
    Nawh, it's not possible no matter how talented you are. 5.0 have tons of match experience, which you really can't make up for with sheer athleticism.

    That being said, a Div1 (5.5 NTRP) singles player I know has only been competing in tournies for two years, and he's bottom of the roster. That being said, he plays for over 30 hours a week, on court, 45 weeks (ish) of the year. That doesn't include his off court fitness. Guy is a machine, and I really wouldn't recommend it as it is very easy to get injured with that heavy of a workload.

    I've gotten around 3 years of serious tennis under my belt and I can hang with open players to hit with, but I only compete at what would be an American 4.5 level because of my awful mental game. 4.0 is very attainable if you are halfway decently fit, and have a good stroke base. The biggest thing at 5.0 however, as I already said though is the match toughness that comes along with it. I simply don't play enough matches to really keep mentally tough.

    Good luck though, I really hope you can succeed! :)

    -Fuji
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2013
    #47
  48. dr325i

    dr325i Legend

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2007
    Messages:
    5,270
    Location:
    TX
    Not sure how possible this is, however, just last week I had a pleasure to play with a solid 4.0 in Taipei that started playing 2 years ago. I don't think this guy plays every day either, if he did, I could see him at 4.5 -5.0.
     
    #48
  49. Venetian

    Venetian Professional

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    1,397
    It's definitely possible for certain people to reach higher levels of play in a shorter period than others. I've seen several players pick up tennis early in high school and go on to play college tennis after their senior year. I would say they were 4.5 to 5.0 level players. So beginner to 5.0 in about 4 years is pretty darn good. But 1 year? I don't see that happening.

    The most important thing to consider is also not time or money spent training, but natural ability. If you have amazing hand-eye coordination and athleticism, then you might be one of those guys who can climb relatively high in a few years. But if you lack in either or those areas, you'll probably never get there. So make sure you realistically evaluate your abilities before dumping a bunch of money into this quest. There's usually one of these types of threads on TTW every year, and most of the time the player wastes a bunch of money and we never hear from them again. Though it does often provide a lot of entertainment. And you can't always put a price on that.
     
    #49
  50. tennis ratchet

    tennis ratchet New User

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2013
    Messages:
    71
    the difference between 4.0, 4.5 and 5.0 is going to be technique--they will know better and better the correct shot to make from multiple positions on the courts, with pace--but more than that, consistency. consistency is the real killer and honestly i don't think you can learn it in just one year.
     
    #50

Share This Page