NTRP 0 to 5 in a year? Is that possible?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Stergios, Mar 2, 2013.

  1. barringer97

    barringer97 Rookie

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    You need 10,000 hours to get to a 5.0. Can't do that in a year.

    It's similar to a scratch golfer.

    Good luck.
     
    #51
  2. Sumo

    Sumo Semi-Pro

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    Compulsion fulfilled.
     
    #52
  3. 1980

    1980 New User

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    This is an unrealistic goal I think. I've spent a lot of time moving from hobby to hobby and devoting exorbitant amounts of time trying to become good at this or that. Often times a year is long enough to become better than average at something, but it takes years to unlock the subtle nuances that only come from hard earned experience. That being said, when you aspire to absolute greatness, try your hardest and fail, you still end up being pretty damned good.
     
    #53
  4. Phonco

    Phonco Rookie

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    Maybe if you're a 7ft tall player with a Isner/Karlovic caliber serve. You'd probably be able to take players to tiebreakers and break it down to luck. Karlovic is a guy I feel who has okay/sub-par strokes, but his serve is so good that he can compete.

    On a more serious note, I'd say it's not impossible, but very improbable. I think it's possible to be able to hit at that level, but to "play" at that level is a different story. Personally I feel the higher up you go, the less it becomes about strokes and the more it becomes about intangibles/experience/mentality. That comes with lots of hours of playing.

    You would need a few conditions to have chance at completing your goal.

    -Great coach
    - 5.0/5.5+ hitting partners who, for some reason, are dedicated to helping only you
    -Athletically gifted, or came from another explosive type sport i.e basketball, track sprinter etc.
    -Dedicate your life and play something like 10 hours a day, every day
    -No injuries

    If you had all this, learned everything right the first time, then you might hit your goal in one year. If not, then you'll at least be able to rally at that level.

    My only proof is that I actually met someone who had very similar conditions, but his goal wasn't 5.0 nor was he under such a deadline. However, I still think your goal is still extremely improbable.
     
    #54
  5. JW10S

    JW10S Hall of Fame

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    What people do not understand is that as you move up improving gets harder, not easier. Getting from a 2.5 to a 3.5 is not very difficult, but getting from 3.5 to 4.5 is difficult. It's analagous to a swimmer or runner who can take seconds off their times early on but as they get higher in the ranks taking 10ths or even 100ths of a second off is very hard and is often the difference between finishing 1st or last. The NTRP scale does not go up linearly but exponentially. You can't go from nothing to something special fast or easily, sorry to burst the bubble but it won't happen.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2013
    #55
  6. Ryoma

    Ryoma Rookie

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    Why a year? What not an hour? Don't let time stop you.
     
    #56
  7. eidolonshinobi

    eidolonshinobi Professional

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    I'm in the end of my second year (year 3 this summer) in my tennis journey and I'm a solid upper 4.0, can hang with 4.5s but not consistently. I played a lot...still playing.

    I won't say that I don't doubt you...tennis is just so technical and so many strokes are needed to even be considered a 4.5 player.

    Being athletic will help tremendously as I reached 3.5 within a year. But it just gets harder from there.

    This was my progress:
    http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3DBE7D128D2A8117

    I dont have my first few months on here because I deleted my old youtube account. But pretty much a bunch of wall hitting and ugly playing. It hurts my eyes when I watch old video of myself playing but gives me motivation to always keep improving because I've already gotten so far.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2013
    #57
  8. iradical18

    iradical18 Professional

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    I'll not say it's impossible but to be at a legitimate 5.0 level in a year would be just shy of it. That said, I'm rooting for you!
     
    #58
  9. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    I don't know how badly jordan wanted and needed to do really well in baseball. I doubt his passion for baseball was a tenth of that for basketball as he was just starting NBA. I believe if he had the same amount of passion and desire in baseball at his age and had coaches who could translate his talent to baseball, he could have become at least competitive in major league.

    balancing ability in skateboarding, motorcross, and archery can translate well to tennis, strength of upperbody needed for moto and archery will help upperbody coordination for tennis, breathing and focusing ability in archery can be useful for tennis as well. and there's the gamesmanship that can be learned in any competition. etc
     
    #59
  10. TomT

    TomT Hall of Fame

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    Well Stergios, I like your sig, but I think it's important to set realistic goals. If you're young, and fit, and have had some experience playing 'ball and tool' sports such as baseball, table tennis, squash, badminton, etc., and with a passionate commitment and many hours of diligent, tedious practice, then maybe you might reach a 3.5 to 4.0 level of competitive play in a year. The difference between that and a 5.0 player is, I would guess, beyond your capability to comprehend at this time. Anyway, I think it's beyond my comprehension at this time. :)

    5.0 is a really proficient level of play. It's a long term goal (certainly much longer than a year) for somebody just starting out. Here's a suggestion. If you're really committed to and passionate about this, then put it out there. Start a thread on Talk Tennis. A video diary of your progress.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2013
    #60
  11. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi Slowfox,

    I don't know for sure if I have developed any skills I can transfer to my tennis. Although I have learnt from previous experiences the ups and downs of learning a new skill as well as the personal effort it requires.

    BoramiNYC put all these sports to perspective though, in his later post.

    Thanks for your applause. It's very much needed indeed.

    Cheers,

    Stergios
     
    #61
  12. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi BoramiNYC,

    I've read all your comments in this thread. And I'd like to thank you for taking an active stance towards it.

    I do have a good team as you might saw on my site. I'm very fortunate to have them. Otherwise I don't know if that would be even a matter of a question to start with.

    I started taking stretching really seriously after an adductor strain just before I began the intensive training. It took almost three months to heal and I'm just starting to feel relieved as it still can be felt sore if I don't warm up properly.

    I like to read and understand how things work. I do lot's of stretches that can be found on the book The anatomy of stretching.

    I spend 40 minutes a day doing stretches, six times a week. I started slowly by doing five to ten minutes every second day. And I progressed from there.

    I should say I'm kind of stiff. Not as a kid though. But I already see a noticeable improvement after three months of stretching.

    As for the different muscles that we don't usually know they exist, I'm trying to learn them out and develop them.
    One of the things that might help me, and currently trying out, is ballet. Yeah, that's right. I saw a video on YouTube of how ballet dancers are able to move fast, stop in a blink of an eye and stay balanced all the time.
    I know, they put a gazillion hours on learning that. But still a good technique.

    I started to researching and found out that there are reports of pro athletes, mostly football players and boxers, that took ballet classes in order to improve balance, footsteps and body awareness.

    I had only a couple of lessons so far and it's beyond my imagination the muscles involved in ballet. I'll have twice a week one hour private lesson for a month. And if I see I can benefit my tennis in the short or long run I will continue taking lessons for longer. Though I don't know if I like it, I hope I will do.

    I'll keep you posted on my findings.

    Cheers,

    Stergios
     
    #62
  13. ShoeShiner

    ShoeShiner Rookie

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    I think it is possible. 5.0 does not require much competitive/mental skill.

    What is the reason to do such hurry? Why you have to do that?

    If one does something too much, one must sacrifice something much too.
    TIME, MONEY, HEALTH, FRIENDSHIP, RELATIONSHIP, etc.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2013
    #63
  14. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    That's nice Relinquis! You should have a rich collection of rackets :).
    I've seen a couple of badminton matches online and reaction time looks like way under a second.

    That's what got me in to tennis. The fun character of it. Ok...and the pretty girls with the short skirts I should admit :).
     
    #64
  15. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi LF,

    Well it's a very nice system of indicating your play. And the only one I personally know at least. And although they don't have leagues using that exact system in Europe (as I'm aware of), they do use it in clubs in order to match players for a game. So, it's known and understood.

    What's the difference between 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 etc to 1m, 1.5m, 2m, 2.5m etc? Wouldn't be the same kind of a challenge?

    What I'm saying here, it's not that I'm eager to be the best of anybody else! That's above my means and reality as I grasp it. I just want to be the best I can in the least possible time.
    What I'm saying is that I'd like to challenge what's "possible" of today and secondly have fun, play tennis and make some good friends.

    That's all..

    Cheers,

    Stergios
     
    #65
  16. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi Kimbahpnam,

    Good point!

    Though in my case 0 illustrates someone who never played before.

    Thanks for commenting.

    Stergios
     
    #66
  17. Hi I'm Ray

    Hi I'm Ray Hall of Fame

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    I think if you have the right coaching/guidance and good opponents/hitting partners to play against you can get to a lower 4.0 in a year, or a strong 3.5.
     
    #67
  18. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi DakotaM,

    That's a hell of a good progress! What happened after you reached 4?
    I now tend to believe that a lot of players stop practicing after reaching a good level of play. And then have lots of matches. Of course that's the point of learning a skill. In order to be able to perform it and get joy out of it.
    But what if some kept trying they way they did before reaching a good level of play like 4? Combining that with a few hours of practice? Would it be any difference? What're your thoughts?

    I do play better players than me and you're right it helps a ton!

    I'll keep you posted on the progress.

    Stergios
     
    #68
  19. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi JW10S,

    Thanks for commenting. What do you think I'm missing? (I'm genuinely asking). Other than the argument of how feasible that goal is; Which is to my acknowledgement.

    I don't say you don't know what you're talking about. The opposite is the reason which brought me here. I'm just confident enough to be willing to try. And I need your help to point me out. If it would have been of a slimmest possibility to be my goal feasible by any means what would you advise me to do?

    Thanks once again,

    Stergios
     
    #69
  20. mikeespinmusic

    mikeespinmusic Rookie

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    Very possible

    Haters gonna hate.

    Yes it is possible. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. I did it in 10 months. Or at least an equivalent level for Australia ;) (Division 2) I did it because I avoided the politics, trained hard and dug in deep. and I'm now in Division 1. It also helps that I'm fast, young and fit...but the point is if you want it that much, the training and learning won't be a chore!

    I also learned about lead tape early on. What kind of player do you want to be? Find your identity and use this thread to compliment the style you want to go for.

    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=309803

    Ignore your current strengths and weaknesses. E.g if you have a weak 1 hand backhand, its probably unstable due to a light racquet. So don't be afraid to add lead to beef it up and watch your problems almost immediately disappear... almost.. :p still make sure you train and work on the form and footwork - I know a lot of people will quote me and express their disagreement in some way...but hey...thats what happened with me, why can't it with you?

    A lot of players are too arrogant to use it (Lead tape). I've beaten people that have been playing since they were a kid, they ask how long I've been playing and they don't believe me. I even offer them some tape to try out and its always "no thanks, I'll just work on my strokes". Then I beat them again later on...

    Be sure to make friends and practise with the ones that are smart enough to take the plunge and use it. They're probably gonna be the better players.

    Be sure to sharpen up on strategy as well. Winning Ugly by Brad Gilbert is a terrific book for this. When the chips are down, it tells you how to think. The title seems nasty and implies dirty gamesmanship but its more about keeping a level head. He's basically called it that for his rivalrly "love" for mcenroe, connors and lendl,

    For form, if you can't afford to work with a pro be sure to look up Tom Avery on youtube. That works wonders!

    Thats my two cents about how to go about it, because thats pretty much what I did ;)
     
    #70
  21. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    Let's be realistic. A 5.0 level player is a pretty good collegiate level player in the US. The best collegiate athletes are around 6.0 to 6.5 and the weakest around 4.0 to 4.5 with 5.0 to 5.5 being the middle level. This player has on average played tennis for 5-10 years or more. They on average start as a junior and played junior tournaments, junior leagues, high school tennis, and received in excess of 100 hours of coaching along the way and sometimes 1,000s of hours of coaching.

    If you are a professional level athlete in a vigorous high skill sport such as soccer, American baseball, basketball, or a few others; there is a 50% or less chance that you could reach 5.0 level tennis if you completely dedicated yourself to tennis and received good coaching for 1 year. By "dedicate"; I mean you play/practice 5 to 6 times per week, work on fitness 5 times a week or more, receive quality coaching weekly or more often, and play in competitive leagues against good competition for the year. Even with this time of athletic skill and dedication, odds are against you making it in 1 year. "Making it to 5.0" means you could play in 5.0 level tournaments or leagues and over say 20 or more matches win 50% of the matches. You may be able to have some 5.0 looking shots with a year but winning at 5.0 level requires consistency, fitness, match toughness, and exposure to high level competition.

    Realistically, a good amateur athlete that is pretty fit and works very hard at tennis 4-5 times per week with some coaching can make it to somewhere around 3.5 to 4.0 in 1 year.

    But, as you said, tennis girls have the shortest skirts which makes the game more than worthwhile.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2013
    #71
  22. luvforty

    luvforty Banned

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    then again - an athlete who is already playing at elite level in a different sport, would have already known the effort it takes to reach a high level, and would never ask a question of going to 5,000,000 in 1 year.
     
    #72
  23. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

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    The big issue here is the speed of transition. If OP said he just wanted to get to 5.0 someday, we'd all be "Yeah man, do it..!"

    Can't say for certain about Jordan's motivation and commitment for baseball, but is it safe to say that he's one of the most competitive athletes in history? I imagine he'd have brought some of that to baseball.

    Not entirely sold on the skateboard etc translation. Cooking dinner requires timing, coordination, awareness, hand skills. Mowing the lawn might require upper body strength and footwork.

    Lead tape is good. Don't get too obsessed with tinkering with equipment though. The process may never end... :)
     
    #73
  24. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi Fuji,

    Wow! Your friend must be sleeping in court! That's tons of hours. Although I'm not far away.
    I understand by now that mentally you have to be equally advanced as technically. And that adds up to the challenge probably.

    Thanks for wishing me luck though. I should need it :).

    I will keep you post it with the progress and tomorrow I'm planning on getting some footage for you to see.

    Cheers,

    Stergios
     
    #74
  25. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    Haha it's pretty ridiculous as he's a full course load university student as well. Guy has great time management skills!

    The mental game is IMO more then half the battle, it's tough to be "match tough" without getting in tons of actual match play. As long as you can get a good base of hitting partners that are willing to work frequently with you and play matches, it should help a lot.

    I look forward to seeing footage!

    Cheers,

    -Fuji
     
    #75
  26. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    Very good post.

    Don't give up on your goal, but make it realistic. Give yourself 5 years. Even in that time frame, you're going to need to spend at least 10 hours per week on court with great training partners and coaches. You'll need to get in a ton of actual competitive matches as well.

    With that level of dedication, I think it could be done.
     
    #76
  27. DakotaM

    DakotaM New User

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    I believe I reached 4.0 very recently, Within the last month probably. I still play 6 days a week at practices with my college team, and get personal attention from my friend who is a coach 3 times a week. I'm not very athletic naturally, so from what you have said I think it is definitely possible for you to reach a higher level than me.

    You mentioned in another post that it is not so much about reaching 5.0, but getting as good as you can in a short period of time. If that is the case, you should definitely aim for 5.0 and work towards it every chance you get. You may get there, and you might not. However, since you're aiming high you will never have a chance to slack off.

    Good luck with your goals!
     
    #77
  28. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi Dr325i,

    That's good news!

    Although I see most of the people who have spent a few years in tennis is puzzled/arguing for the 4+ level...

    But that's encouraging.

    Stergios
     
    #78
  29. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi Venetian,

    I enjoyed your comment. Very well put.

    Although I still have to try it! And I'll make sure I will keep you updated for as long as I'm pursuing this challenge.

    So I can guaranty your level of entertaiment on the matter :). I hope though to provide more than entertainment.

    Cheers,

    Stergios
     
    #79
  30. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    Forgive me if I missed it, but I was wondering if you have an action plan. I know you gave up a lot to focus on tennis, but how much are willing (or able) to practice? Are you going to get lessons? Do you know where to find hitting partners and good coaches? Are you going to look for USTA tournaments?

    This might be a good place to get some info on that stuff.
     
    #80
  31. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi Barringer97,

    Thanks for posting.

    I'm familiar with the 10000 hour rule. There is an interesting book about that which you might already know. It's called Outliers by Malcom Gladwell.

    Although If you look close to it, it might take 10000 hours to unleash your full potential. And that makes a lot of sense.
    But from person to person the limit differs. Not only as person (as I don't purely believe in talent), but as how we approach our learning process.
    So, 2000 hours might translate to 8000 of an other in terms of comparative performance.

    Thanks for wishing me luck, fingers crossed!

    Cheers,

    Stergios
     
    #81
  32. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi 1980,

    You got it very right indeed. And I can see some personal similarities here, I should say.

    But what I wanted to point out is the last part of your comment. Which is brilliantly true. Even if you don't make it you still have gone far enough. How would even be possible to excel if not aiming hi? And what's unrealistic today might not be tomorrow.

    Also well put by DakotaM in a later post which I'm going to address shortly.

    Thanks for your input 1980.

    Cheers,

    Stergios
     
    #82
  33. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi Phonco,

    Thanks for your elaborate post.
    Well I'm not 7ft, I'm 6'2'' I think that's in the range. As for the rest here we are:

    Haves
    • A great coach, way more than 5.5. As well as some good hitting partners who are willing to help with this challenge.
    • I have an athletic structure. Not to the extreme though. You will see some videos the following days.
    • I have dedicated my life for a full year at least. I'm committed. I sold and put away 80% of my stuff and moved in a tiny studio in order to afford the project.
    • I take quite seriously my body and I take care of it as much as I possibly can.
    Don't haves
    • I don't have a background of an explosive kind of sport such as basketball or football.
    • Patience (although a lot of people will argue with me if they hear me say it).

    Improbable? That's part of the challenge :).

    I'll keep you post it.

    Thanks once again.

    Stergios
     
    #83
  34. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi Ryoma,

    A year because it's a period of time I can afford to dedicate my self to it. It might be for longer. If I stay healthy and motivated to go on. And have the financial means to pursuit it.
    But one year was a more feasible period of time to me personally. Logistically speaking.

    Stergios
     
    #84
  35. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi Eidolonshinobi,

    What did you do to go to 4 so fast? What kind of schedule?
    Do you mind sharing, briefly, the ups and downs through out your journey?

    I enjoyed your videos. Well done! What others have to say about Eidolonshinobi's videos?

    I'll keep you updated.

    Stergios
     
    #85
  36. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi Iradical18,

    Thanks for rooting for me. I appreciate it.

    Stergios
     
    #86
  37. tennis_balla

    tennis_balla Hall of Fame

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    With enough proper coaching, dedicated and natural talent, a person could theoretically groove enough to have close to 5.0 looking strokes.....in practice.

    The problem is, learning to play matches at the 5.0 level is a whole other discussion. Hitting the ball at a 5.0 level and playing the ball at a 5.0 level are 2 different things.
     
    #87
  38. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi Tom,

    That was a very humbled and honest way to say it. Although I'll have to go for it. As I said earlier it's not a matter of a number. But moreover to challenge, slightly, what's possible today. And push the limits for others who might feel the urge, some time in life, to pursuit something similar with their favourite sport.

    As for the video diary, it's a great idea and I keep thinking of it since I first reed your post. Should I do a separate thread or post on this one? What would you guys advise me? What's more appropriate?

    Thanks,

    Stergios
     
    #88
  39. marosmith

    marosmith Professional

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    Start a new thread with video of our progress. Make sure to get some current or past videos up soon so we really can see your stating point.
     
    #89
  40. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi SS,

    Well it's a matter of available resources as well as it adds up to the challenge :). And more in detaile put in posts 83 and 84.

    Cheers,

    Stergios
     
    #90
  41. dr325i

    dr325i Legend

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    Check the post #48 above ;)
     
    #91
  42. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi Mikeespimusic,

    Congrats on your success. You deserve it.

    Although I can't understand how a big of a differnce can make putting lead tape to a beginner's racket. Don't take me wrong. But if someone can't get to the ball how it can help him :).

    Of course I get the point. And after reading your post I'll try to learn more of the benefits offered of a customised racket. I might even play around with my racket after practice.

    Thanks for giving me a thump up. It means a lot to me!

    I'll keep you posted both of my tennis progress and my racket experiments.

    Cheers,

    Stergios
     
    #92
  43. Stergios

    Stergios Rookie

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    Hi HunterST,

    Thanks for asking. No, you not missed it. Other than I have a great coach.

    My daily schedule looks like this,

    8:00 – 9:00 Breakfast
    9:15 Gear checked and loaded
    9:30 Arrival at tennis facility
    9:45 – 10:00 Warm up
    10:00 – 12:00 Practice session with coach (6 times a week)
    12:00 – 12:30 Relax and snack
    12:30 – 13:30 Light warm up, ball machine drills and serve practice (3 times a week)
    13:30 – 13:45 Relax and snack
    13:45 – 14:30 Stretch
    14:30 – 17:45 Launch, relax, recover
    18:00 – 20:00 Strength and conditioning (3 times a week)

    I do think this is a great place to learn more. And it's a very active and alive community.

    Once more thanks for asking :).

    Stergios
     
    #93
  44. luvforty

    luvforty Banned

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    ok, so this is a marketing campaign.
     
    #94
  45. rkelley

    rkelley Hall of Fame

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    I just saw this thread.

    Stergios, give it a try. I'm with what appears to be the majority and don't think that a year to 5.0 is very likely, but who knows. I've hit with people who were natural athletes (this would not be me) and they can have beautiful strokes and movement and they rarely play. They weren't 5.0, but they were maybe a 3.5 level, but a 3.5 with the basic strokes to go much higher with practice as opposed to a 3.5 who's hacking and pushing the ball and getting wins, but will never get any better without totally redoing their game.

    I don't know if anyone else brought this up, but one thing to think about is that you're going to have to hit a lot of balls. Be mindful of your body, especially your joints - shoulder, knees and back. Tennis is a sport of overuse injuries, and playing as much as you're going to need to you'll need to be careful. There are exercises that you can do to strengthen your rotator cuff in you shoulder - look them up on the web. They are very specific motions with light force. The knees - I don't know what you can do. Keep your back stretched.

    Good luck.
     
    #95
  46. rkelley

    rkelley Hall of Fame

    Joined:
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    Let's do that math:

    10,000 hours
    4 hours per day practice
    6 days a week
    52 weeks a year

    That's 8 years - the schedule above is fairly insane.

    I understand and agree with your basic point that there's a certain number of hours that you just need to put in, but it's not necessarily 10,000 hours. It's going to depend on the person, the training, the coaching, etc. People get to 5.0 with way less than 10,000 hours. Some people could practice their whole lives and never get to 5.0 (I think this would be a minority assuming they were really interested in doing it, had the time, access to coaching, health is OK, etc.).

    Just my unsubstantiated opinion however.
     
    #96
  47. doobiedoodoo

    doobiedoodoo Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2012
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    Forehand, backhand, volley, serve....... apply 10000 hours to each and you get........
     
    #97
  48. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2007
    Messages:
    5,803
    I'd bet against the success of this experiment, but I find it interesting anyway, and I'd like to see you document your progress.

    My small piece of advice is going to be to take recovery and injury prevention very seriously. For instance, I'd start doing the thrower's ten exercises to protect your shoulder right now. One serious or not so serious injury could derail this experiment very quickly. A positive thing is today you can get very good information and training advice online to keep yourself healthy and give yourself the best odds possible.

    Good luck.
     
    #98
  49. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

    Joined:
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    3,412
    So that comes out to about 15 hours per week. With that schedule, you'll definitely be a good player. Especially if you're hitting with a coach who has played at the pro level. Not sure about 5.0 by the end of the year, but a great jump start to getting there eventually. Don't forget to actually compete as much as possible!

    At the very least, it looks like you'll be having a lot of fun with that schedule. Are you going to be working at all or living off of savings?
     
    #99
  50. eidolonshinobi

    eidolonshinobi Professional

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Sunny San Diego
    Hmm... I started with a lot of wall hitting just to get used to what hitting a tennis ball is like etc. Tried to find and figure out basic strokes through youtube videos and implementing them against the wall. Another reason why I did this was so that when I asked (or was asked) to hit with other people I would at least be able to do short rallies.

    I found that rallying and hitting against the wall are completely different, once you've got a decent foundation against the wall you kind of have to start over when hitting with someone else.

    I used to practice 4-5 days a week or so about three to four hours each time. I always started and ended practices with serves, I'd end up maybe serving 60-70 times a day. Not much but enough for me to get the placement and timing to improve.

    Asked advice here, which is a double edge sword, a lot of the advice are good but take it in stride. Pick one or two things out and work on them per week.

    It'll take time and a lot of dedication, but you can improve greatly if you're motivated. You have one resource I didn't have while learning, a coach. This will take you further faster than my journey. Self analyzing your strokes is really taxing, but having a good coach will really help you out.

    Since I've moved to Taipei last August, I play once (twice a week if I'm lucky). Recently I found a great hitting partner so I'm out on the courts more.


    Haha thanks! I hope if you come back to Taipei before I leave, we can hit again.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2013

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