On a serve what type of backswing is better?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Kaz00, Dec 30, 2009.

  1. Kaz00

    Kaz00 Semi-Pro

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    well ive been wondering which backswing is better backscratch position (trophy pose i think is what its called) or short backswing like andy roddick?

    umm honestly i dont know what u would call the serve backswings but anyway back on topic i use a short backswing because i injuired my shoulder.
     
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  2. Blake0

    Blake0 Hall of Fame

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    There are 2 backswings. Long motion, and abbrieviated motion. Long is what federer uses, abbrieviated is what roddick uses. It doesn't really matter what you choose, as long as your timing is good with that backswing. (your contact point is at it's highest point, your body movements are synced.)
     
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  3. minisellars

    minisellars New User

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    it doesnt matter massively as long as you carry the fundementals into whatever swing you choose e.g high contact point, a balance between a loose and firm wrist and try to use every muscle in your body to either create pace or spin
     
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  4. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    Backscratch is not a type of backswing. Every pro server, including Roddick will progress into the backscratch position during their serve. You should never attempt to go into a backscratch position, it happens naturally as you transition from the trophy pose to your forward swing, kinda like a whip motion as your arm drops back briefly before it swings forward.

    Watch his backscratch in slow motion:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epNQNJv8334

    One thing that you want to avoid during your trophy pose is the palm of your racquet-hand facing forward, which prevents the proper backscratch progression from happening. This is very comon among lower-rated rec. players. Instead your palm should face sideways or even kinda backwards, which depends on how long or short your backswing is.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2009
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  5. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    You seem to be a bit confused about the terminology. The trophy pose is really more of a momentary trophy position rather than a static position for most servers. A few servers, with very high tosses, may actually pause at the trophy position, but most do not. The trophy position occurs when the tossing arm is fully extended (after the ball release) and the racquet arm is bent in an L (~ 90 degrees for most elite servers). The racquet (head) is more or less in an up position.

    The backscratch position happens a bit later. When the racquet head drops behind the back (or below the shoulder), nearly vertical, from the trophy position, it is said to be in the backscratch position.

    For the most part, the various backswings (racquet preparation motions) are independent of the trophy position and the backscratch position. A server can get to the trophy (and subsequent backscratch) position in a variety of ways. Which backswing that is best for you is largely a matter of personal preference.

    The various backswings can be loosely classified in 2 or 3 ways. Andy Roddick's motion is an example of an abbreviated motion. Simpler versions of the abbreviated motion are also possible -- even less motion than Roddick. Pete Sampras has a a backswing motion that is a very full, classic motion. Roger Federer is a quicker variation of the Sampras motion.

    Many players have developed something of a hybrid motion in the past few years -- less robust than the classic motion of Sampras, but somewhat fuller than the more abbreviated racquet preparation motion. In a hybrid motion, the racquet head is often dropped from the initial position much like the full/classic motion. However, the racquet head is then suddenly brought to the trophy position by a quick external rotation of the shoulder coupled with the elbow drawn back to the trophy position.
     
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  6. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I respect Andy Roddick's abilities, but I don't recommend trying to copy his motion. It's really compact, violently explosive, and he has a world class physicality that allows him to repeat that serve without sending his shredded arm over the net along with the ball. Just my opinion.

    Aside from any official names for serving styles, one thing I like to recommend to some folks is finding a comfortable serving tempo without hitting a ball. Most of us can do that smooth practice motion just fine, but then when it's time to actually serve a ball, it gets rushed and jerky.

    What's the difference? Many players, even the pros here and there, will go up after the ball before getting their service motion comfortably loaded up and ready to release to contact. In simple terms, many of us toss the ball before we're ready to hit it. All we can do in that case is rush the motion and muscle the racquet to the ball.

    Try some smooth practice motions and find a good tempo, hopefully something that's not strained or at all painful. Then figure out how to toss late enough to be able to hit the ball with that same smooth motion. Be patient - it can be really strange trying to change "when" you toss. If you use a bit of knee bend, you might be trying to toss the ball upward while your body is sinking downward. There's a smooth and easy serve in there somewhere if you keep after it.
     
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  7. WinnerDTL

    WinnerDTL New User

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    Use what feels better, where you can achieve better timing.

    BTW I normally connect the abreviated motion to pinpoint stance ande the long one to plataform stance. Not everytime, but most of the time, is this accurate?
     
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  8. Kaz00

    Kaz00 Semi-Pro

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    ah okay thx everybody for your responses!
     
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