on the drop - on the rise - on the top

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by albesca, Sep 24, 2013.

  1. albesca

    albesca Rookie

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    Hallo guys.

    Assumed the ball can come in the perfect contact zone on the drop, on the rise or at the top, such as variation do you take in the swing ?

    thank you
     
    #1
  2. dominikk1985

    dominikk1985 Legend

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    it depends on ball height. on a high topspin on the rise is best. and against a low shot you would go for the highest point. on the drop is not so good but sometimes cannot be avoided.
     
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  3. albesca

    albesca Rookie

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    thank you, but i am not asking how is the best point.

    i want to know if you change the swing path/ swing style
    in relation of the ball distance and trajectory after the bounce.
     
    #3
  4. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    if rising the racquet face should be more closed and/or slightly flatter swingpath. for falling more open face and/or lohi swingpath. when dealing with heavy topspin close the face even more. and as you increase the RHS less of these adjustments needed.
     
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  5. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    I prefer to take balls just after the peak. I find it much easier to time than taking it on the rise and much easier to hit a lot of topspin. I think the ball has slowed a bit after the peak of the bounce and I feel as if I have more time to lift and drive it with top.

    Next, would be around the peak.

    Hitting a rising ball requires better timing and for me, I usually use a shorter backswing. Rising ball is most difficult of the 3 for me.

    But, you have to practice all 3. Many times deep shots must be taken on the rise as you don't have time to back up or tactically don't want to back up.
     
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  6. rkelley

    rkelley Hall of Fame

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    The biggest difference for me is closing the racquet face more for balls on the rise. I don't really change my swing path based on whether the ball is on the rise or the drop. That said, when I'm taking it on the rise the timing is more difficult and I'm not going to be able to generate the same amount of topspin since the ball is rising into my racquet. For balls on the rise I really try to think about defending my contact point and not letting the ball come into my body too far.

    But the basic swing is the same for me.
     
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  7. wrxinsc

    wrxinsc Professional

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    after bounce rising into my contact zone i will swing high to low. for a ball dropping after bounce dropping into my contact zone i swing 'normal' low to high. that about all the adjustment i make. i will use my feet to get into 'normal' strike zone for singles rally shot sort of stuff. in dubs particularly on return of a good kick serve i take early with ball rising. otherwise take what you are given and make a good swing.
     
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  8. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    My approach is to use balls "on the drop" to hit higher over net, with major
    biting top spin, almost like a kick serve. Against good players, you don't get to
    do this much, but it is very effective when you do. I'm always on the look out
    for this op. The prep for this one is big loop and well below the ball for low to
    high. Nadal does this a lot and it is part of the reason he likes to stay so far
    behind the baseline where he gets to do this more.

    At the top or close is the most normal one I face, and this gives you some
    options. Major top spin here is Harder to do than with an "on the drop" ball,
    but you can load this one
    up pretty good for top spin too along with other options.
    Generally this is one to go with best power and
    just avg top spin. This is a great one to use to push your opp around a bit.
    Prep for this one is normal big backswing and moderate to almost no below the ball
    for some top spin. Racket face ever so slightly closed for a strong
    swing. Fed seems to like this one the best and it gives him lots of options.

    On the rise is one that I use the hitters pace to redirect like a rtn of strong
    serve if it is coming with power. If it is coming softer, I'll treat it more like a second
    serve...still shorter swing, but with more of my power & still re-directing. Prep here
    is also slightly closed to a vertical racket face at contact, but with a
    pretty compact swing like a strong half volley swing.
    Agassi was really known for this one and taking away the time from his opp.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2013
    #8
  9. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    pushing the contact point more forward closes the racquet face more. this is better way to control the face angle than doing it with hand.
     
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  10. albesca

    albesca Rookie

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    thanks All .


    Yes, i have the some feeling.

    You have centered exactly why i wrote here for

    Agree, i stay 2 meter behind to have better percentage to hitting on the drop and have more control whit spin, but is it difficult to build a point only with this shot. As you have gained a space advantage ... you can't wait the ball drops ... have to hit it as early as possible.

    Thank you.

    I feel a difference in forearm supination/pronation timing too.. don't you ?

    thank you
     
    #10
  11. skiracer55

    skiracer55 Hall of Fame

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    First thing you want to do...

    ...is figure out what your ideal hitting zone is. "Ideal hitting zone" is something Stan Smith talked about, and the key concept is that it's not going to be the same for everyone. Some players (with Conti grips, typically), like low bouncing balls. Players with FW grips tend to do well with high bouncing balls. Most of us like balls in the wheelhouse, right about waist level.

    To hit good shots and do so consistently, you need to move your feet and prepare early so that you give yourself the best chance of contacting the ball in your ideal hitting zone. Is that always possibly? Not hardly, because your opponent doesn't want you to get set up well, or, as Peter Burwash once noted, "Tennis is a series of controlled emergencies." So, yeah, when the ball isn't in your ideal hitting zone, you adjust and do what you have to do to get it back, and that usually means some change in your swing path/timing. Just try to make it a reasonable variation on your standard swing path (that is, don't panic and "invent" a stroke you've never hit). When you have to make an adjustment like this, just remember the old saw: Never try to hit an offensive shot from a defensive position, Instead, just find the court with your shot, pass the problem back to your opponent, and get your feet moving...
     
    #11
  12. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    on drop, rise or top is all secondary. You hit the ball where/when you can set up your strike zone as fast as you can. That means, if you could set up your ideal strike zone fast, you are faster and could take time away from your opponent. Advanced players could and need to hit all shots. It's always about ability to set up fast. The factor of speed and time.
     
    #12
  13. rkelley

    rkelley Hall of Fame

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    A lot of good thoughts here IMO.

    I tend to stand up closer to baseline because I'm looking for that shorter ball to do something offensive with, but when my opponents are hitting big I end up taking a lot of balls on the rise and I feel like I'm getting a lot of pressure pushing me back. It's hard to consistently control and direct these balls (which is why Agassi was so great), but I do steal time from my opponent and decrease angles when I can handle hitting on the rise.

    I'm considering playing with my positioning a bit.
     
    #13
  14. albesca

    albesca Rookie

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    i don't talk about a emergency situation... i am talking
    about a tactical/technical situation.

    if i am behind the baseline .... my priority is producing a
    deep heavy shot, so, i know hitting on the drop, i am able to produce
    more spin, good power and clearance, that means more consistency.
    then i stay 2 meter behind the baseline and search the ball for the strike zone i like.

    if i gain an inside the court position, my priority becomes
    to take time away from my opponent, than, i cant
    search for a dropping ball... i have to hit a different shot.

    thanks

    92626, i'm not agree drop or rise is secondary.
    At equal eight, I seem it makes difference
    in back swing, raquet face orientation and follow through too.
    agree about the ability to set up fast. thank you
     
    #14
  15. skiracer55

    skiracer55 Hall of Fame

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    Go back and see what I said about the ideal hitting zone...

    ...so it sounds like you like a ball that's lower in the strike zone. Yep, if you're behind the baseline, you can look for a ball that's dropping into this location. If you start moving in, you can still contact the ball low, you just have to take it on the rise. Is this a different stroke? I'd just call it a modification: shorter backswing, earlier prep, then hit long through the ball just as if you were hitting a dropping ball.

    One of my hitting partners and I have a drill that promotes this skill. We both stand about halfway between the baseline and the service line and exchange groundstrokes. It's kind of an extended mini-tennis. It's a great drill because it forces a player to set up quickly, hit a clean stroke, and recover quickly for the next ball...
     
    #15
  16. TimeSpiral

    TimeSpiral Professional

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    I agree that it's secondary, but I want to push back a little bit: sometimes "holding" on to the ball is the right play. I know that you know this, but I figured I would chime in so other readers made this connection.

    When you hold on to the ball you can change the rhythm of your opponent, and sometimes, even get them to guess too early, setting you up for an easy open court/wrong foot scenario.
     
    #16

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