One of Martina's max 200gs

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by racquetfreak, May 6, 2013.

  1. racquetfreak

    racquetfreak Semi-Pro

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    Last edited: May 6, 2013
    #1
  2. Rock Strongo

    Rock Strongo Legend

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    Two threads!

    The way the "intact" part of the racquet warped after the ending blow is unlike anything I've ever seen from a graphite racquet.
    Thing bent like a woodie!
     
    #2
  3. gavna

    gavna Hall of Fame

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    Remember that's normal for the 200G series.
    Damn things would warp and spoon like noodles.

    The good reason the resin matrix and whole injection process
    was dropped.
     
    #3
  4. yonexRx32

    yonexRx32 Rookie

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    Doubtful this was the reason: I haven't seen a 400i warp, yet it's made through the same process. Moreover, strung at the recommended tension, the rackets were fine.

    The real reason is more likely the high cost of manufacturing compared to regular rackets (and therefore decreased profits) and the increased popularity of smaller weight rackets, weights which could not be achieved through injection molding.
     
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  5. yonexRx32

    yonexRx32 Rookie

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    Yes, thermoplastic vs thermoset. One bends the other breaks. The regular rackets will crack much more easily on impact and will break in multiple places.
     
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  6. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Based on how that break pretzel'd, looks to me that Martina played a pretty high tension and the 200g really performed much better at low tensions including not warping or breaking.

    I did not think the grafil process had any impact on frame structural endurance and just provided dynamic stiffness and dampening.
     
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  7. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Can you explain further ?
    What are the "regular rackets" ?
    What about todays heat treated or hardened graphite ?
     
    #7
  8. yonexRx32

    yonexRx32 Rookie

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    I refer as regular rackets to thermoset rackets: epoxy reinforced with carbon fiber (and some glass or kevlar, depending on model). All the rackets you can purchase currently are made according to this method. . They are stiff and brittle rather than elastic and soft, such as the nylon based Dunlop max 200g, which will not crack as easily but will be more affected by high temperatures.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2013
    #8
  9. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

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    One disadvantage of the IMF process was the limitations in headsize. The 800i had the largest headsize and would deform during stringing if you were not carefull enough.
     
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