One year and a 14 year old is a 3.5. Can be become pro?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Hrandyrko, Oct 4, 2009.

  1. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    Nadal clearly falls under the gifted athlete exception I mentioned before. The OP does not. Uncle Tony was world class soccer player.

    If you had a world class athlete in your direct family history you can start later and get away with hit. Genes and athleticism matter plenty in sports.

    I think americans love to imagine hard work can get you everywhere and is responsible for everything. Truth is tennis is almost directly opposite to that.

    It's often acccess or money that gets you the training you need (son of a pro tennis coach OR really wealthy parents) along with superior athletic genes.

    it's not so different then other sports. Are you going to be a swimmer like Phelps? Not unless you have his height and his weird freaky double joints.. Yes hard training factors into it but its necessary and not sufficent.

    Pete
     
  2. alidisperanza

    alidisperanza Hall of Fame

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    Hey hey, that doesn't mean you should give up your dream. While becoming a pro isn't necessarily an easy grasp there are still other outlets. College tennis seems boring to you now because you're 14. If you have the opportunity to play for a good, competitive high school team you'll get to learn the value of having reliable team-mates and the edge to playing. College tennis, while it can be plain miserable sometimes is an experience worth looking forward too. It's also a great way to pay off your education if you can make it to a scholarship.
     
  3. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    It depends on your astrology sign. If you're a Leo, go for it.
     
  4. volusiano

    volusiano Hall of Fame

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    You probably haven't been on this board long enough to know that this is a VERY juicy topic and whenever a question like this comes up, it brings the board alive with comments.

    I remember a few years back there was another guy from NY asking the same question. His name escaped me at this time, but he was older than you, maybe around 18. But he showed videos of himself and everything, had no coaching, claimed to spend 8 hours a day practicing, etc. I think your thread so far is probably only half as long as his thread.

    There was also another thread from a dad who wanted to know if his young daughter (may be 8 or 10 year old?) whom he coached himself could go pro. Boy, that was even juicier because the dad didn't think his daughter needed any other professional coaches beside himself.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2009
  5. 35ft6

    35ft6 Legend

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    He was around 8 when he switched.
     
  6. Wes_Loves_Dunlop

    Wes_Loves_Dunlop Professional

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    i think your chances are very slim. after a year and 8 months im about a 4.5-5.0 and my varsity captain can beat me in the ball park of 6-1 or 6-2 every set we play.

    and im not even on vars.
     
  7. gastro54

    gastro54 Rookie

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    Didn't Querrey start playing in HS?
     
  8. SourStraws

    SourStraws Rookie

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    No he played when he was younger and didnt get serious until around 15 or so...My coach coached him for a while when he was younger and said he played other sports before getting serious

    Thank goodness Ima Leo

    S.S.
     
  9. NamRanger

    NamRanger G.O.A.T.

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    Yes but he did lose a few years of pivotal training early on by not taking tennis so seriously until way late. He played tennis quite abit, but he also played alot of other sports at the time too (baseball, basketball, etc.)
     
  10. ubermeyer

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    I think Rajeev Ram was the same way... your coach really coached him? that's awesome
     
  11. xFullCourtTenniSx

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    If you want to be a pro, and are 14... You should at least be on the 6.0... Maybe 6.5 level by now. MINIMAL. I probably went from 1.0 to 4.0 in a year... But that's only because I had a kick serve and a good enough forehand. So basically a 3.5 with a kick serve. :) But yeah... I wouldn't set your heart on it.

    Then again... I did this when I was 16 going 17.
     
  12. moroni

    moroni Rookie

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    hokiez is right no chance at all i really mean it it takes"federer talent" to become successful at this age and even if you had that kind of talent you would need money lots of coaching and support from parents.
     
  13. eagle

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    If you mean going on tour and possibly earning prize money by winning a tourney, any tourney, then yes you can give it a shot. Once you earn even a dollar from a tourney, then you can consider yourself a touring pro.

    Whether you will become a top 500 is up to you.

    The odds are stacked against anyone especially a late bloomer like yourself to make it in the pros. But you know what? Maybe you will prove everyone wrong.

    So, go out there and pursue it if you have the drive, conviction, and the means to reach your goals.

    r,
    eagle
     
  14. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    It sounds like you're just doing this as a potential career decision... not for the love of the game. If that's the case, you're going to burn out quickly.
     
  15. Ultra2HolyGrail

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    Source? All i can find is he switched at age 12 in a biography and other quotes.


    "'Rafael began playing tennis at age four, guided by another uncle, Toni Nadal, who remained his coach on the professional tour. In his early years, Nadal (who wrote with his right hand) played left-handed tennis with both a two-handed forehand and backhand. When he was 12, however, his uncle encouraged him to adopt a more conventional left-handed style. Nadal stuck with his two-handed backhand but switched to what became his signature one-handed forehand, the stroke that was credited with lifting him into the sport’s upper echelons.''
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2009
  16. albino smurf

    albino smurf Professional

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    Never give up on your dreams. Push yourself hard enough and you will make it. Don't allow other peoples failings to affect your success.
     
  17. Hrandyrko

    Hrandyrko Rookie

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    Thanks again, Smurf! And everyone else who supports me.
     
  18. gameboy

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    I am sorry, but that is the lamest Hallmark advice I have heard.

    It is good to not to give up on your dreams (when you are very young) and pushing yourself hard is all fine and dandy.

    But to suggest that if you do that "you will make it" is about as naive as they come. The world is filled with people who gave it all and still failed. You have to be talented, driven, AND LUCKY to succeed. One out of three ain't gonna cut it.

    Most people in life do not live their dreams.

    But again, most people are still pretty happy with what they end up doing.
     
  19. eagle

    eagle Hall of Fame

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    ^^ So true. That's reality.

    And remember also that in today's society, everyone is a winner. Everyone is special. Everyone deserves a trophy. Laughable.

    r,
    eagle
     
  20. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    Never give up on your dreams . . . but readjust them when you see reality. See if you can visit a D1 or D2 school and watch the male tennis. See how good their serves are. See how easily their huge shots are retrieved. And so on. See if you can reach THAT before dreaming of a pro career.
     
  21. albino smurf

    albino smurf Professional

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    I guarantee you everybody that is living their dreams never gave up.
     
  22. chess9

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    There is a world of difference between 11 and 14. Essentially, any physical skill you learn before puberty is almost always better than if it were learned after puberty. That's one of the main arguments for starting kids early, plus tennis is a skill sport that takes 10 years to master, at a minimum.

    Also, when LeeD said it 'depends on your parents' he was so right, but not in the way he intended. Inheritance of athletic ability is a key to making it at the top of a sport. If your parents were both Olympic athletes, you might be able to turn pro one day, even having started at 14.

    Regarding the academies, forget it. Nick B. isn't interested in you, and I doubt Saddlebrook is either. You might get into one of the lesser academies, but the cost is quite high. If you get lessons from your local pro, and work hard, and play a lot of local tournaments, you might get into a Division II school and enjoy some fun in college. That is a realistic goal.

    Having said all of the foregoing, never let anyone define your dreams for you.

    -Robert
     
  23. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    Absolutely right!

    -Robert
     
  24. jrod

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    Gotta love it when someone speaks the brutally honest truth...kudos Robert.
     
  25. gameboy

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    That is like saying everyone who is a billionaire is rich. Looking backward, it makes sense. Looking forward? Not so much.
     
  26. albino smurf

    albino smurf Professional

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    Totally disagree and I see no real logic in your statement. To succeed you have to try hard and believe that you can succeed. 99% of all billionaires worked their asses off. 99% of all successful people worked their asses off. While they may have had some doubts at times they all stuck with it.

    An aside, for the OP mainly, think about the athletes that are doing incredible things at an older age than people ever have been able to before ala Lance ARmstrong and Dana Torres.
     
  27. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    What logic are you missing? What you are saying is a classic "Affirming the consequent" fallacy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affirming_the_consequent)

    Let me put it this way.

    100% of the lottery winners bought and played lottery. Does that mean if I buy a lottery ticket, I will be a winner?

    OFCOURSE NOT!

    Having desire/dream is certainly a requirement to living "the dream". But having desire/dream does not mean that you will succeed, far from it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2009
  28. albino smurf

    albino smurf Professional

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    Not trying insures failure. Call it what you want but it is defeatism. You can keep stating your case, but the fact remains that if this kid gives up he will fail. Maybe if he tries he will succeed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2009
  29. albino smurf

    albino smurf Professional

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    Why can't you just post your own ideas? Do you have to come on here and argue with people that have different advice for this kid? How messed up is your ego that you would have to engage in this back and forth to try and prove a point that is purely hypothetical anyway?
     
  30. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

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    You can call it defeatism, I call it facing reality. To ignore the immense odds before you is not being brave, it is just being ignorant and stupid.

    There is enough fantasy hollywood movies and what not to teach kids about "never give up" or "your dreams can and do come true". They don't need any more lessons in that.

    There is almost 0% chance that this kid can become a pro. Just fostering that fantasy can actually be detrimental to his growth. He is old enough to face the truth.

    Sure, he can beat the odds, but he can also grow a wing and fly around the world. But that ain't happening either.
     
  31. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    one of you guys talks like paula and the other one talks like simon :)
     
  32. gameboy

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    I'll take Simon!!! :)

    Smurf, here is why I post on this thread.

    If this kid came on this board and posted something like this;

    "Hey, I just started playing tennis and I love it! I am 14, playing for a year and I am now 3.5. I want to be the best tennis player that I can be. I don't know if that is pro, college, or just a good club player, but I would really like to try and put in the effort to become the best tennis player that I can be. How do I go about doing that?"

    There would be hundreds of posts here encouraging him and giving great advice about improving his game.

    Instead, he posts about how he wants to be pro, doesn't want to play college (because it will hold him back), and don't want to play tennis unless he can become a pro.

    If this kid doesn't need someone to smack some sense into him, then I don't know who does.

    We already have too many arrogant young players in tennis (in any sport, really) who think they are god's gift to tennis. We don't need to add another wanna be with a terrible attitude to that list.
     
  33. The_Steak

    The_Steak Rookie

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    Why are you setting this kid up just to fail?
     
  34. albino smurf

    albino smurf Professional

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    Some of you treat your message boarding like water boarding. Give the kid your bitter 'advice' of failure, I will continue to wish him well and to encourage all people to try hard and persevere to accomplish their goals.
     
  35. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    I'm with you on this...he should definitely drop out of school and use the free time to catch up to his peers on the tennis court.

    Live life to the fullest!
     
  36. The_Steak

    The_Steak Rookie

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    And live life with an empty stomach! And have thousands of dollars in debt! The american dream!
     
  37. Can't think of a name

    Can't think of a name Rookie

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    Dude, your still young. Don't be discouraged by the naysayers on here. If youre determined enough and have enough coaching, it is very possible for you to go pro at some time in the future. Probably not in just a year or two though...it takes time. Now, how successful you are as a pro is a different thing. Only the top pros make enough money to support themselves the rest of their life from a career in tennis. Its not impossible but, you should definatly keep your options open i.e. don't drop out of school.
     
  38. The_Steak

    The_Steak Rookie

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    Don't listen to him, he is around the same age as you. He doesn't even know proper grammar.
     
  39. GuyClinch

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    ^^^ LMAO. Some of you aren't reading this kid right. He isn't interested in being some journeyman touring pro who plays in places like Croatia while not earning enough money to cover hotels and food.. Hell he doesn't even want to bother with college tennis nevermind that kind of hardship.

    Yes he could be THAT kind of pro. The kid wants to know what his chance of being a top 50 ranked pro. It's almost zero - unless he has some kind of awesome athletic backaround we don't know about.

    As for the dreams stuff. Yes sometimes it is stupid to follow your dreams. If some 70 year old guy wants to play in the NBA should he blow his retirement savings trying too?
     
  40. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    I think you're right in this case, that it's not likely that he could go pro (although not completely impossible). However, the way the discussion is going is making you sound pro-giving up. I don't think you really are, but saying that not all people who "don't give up" reach their goals sounds like you're endorsing quiting.

    I think we can all agree people should go after their goals, but have reasonable back ups if their goals are extremely far fetched, like becoming a professional athlete.
     
  41. Can't think of a name

    Can't think of a name Rookie

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    Damn grammar ****...and actually i'm 20... i just don't see the importance of spelling and grammar on a forum.
     
  42. The_Steak

    The_Steak Rookie

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    Because if you do not use proper grammar, you make yourself sound like a 14 year old kid. Notice how I did it?
     
  43. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    No. He should spend it on hot babes and Viagra.
     
  44. Nellie

    Nellie Hall of Fame

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    Why don't you not worry about being a "pro" and instead just try to enjoy the game and be as good as your can?

    I have a acquaintance (college classmate, friend of a friend) who was on the tour and actually made a pretty good ranking (peaking at about 85 or so on the ATP). I think at best, he made about $100K in a year, but he tells me that he never actually netted any money (all the money was spent on traveling, coaches, food, gear, etc). He had a good time traveling, but does not really miss it.
     
  45. volusiano

    volusiano Hall of Fame

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    This is like saying if you never buy a lottery ticket you'll never win the lottery. So yes, there's some logic to it.

    However, if you blow all your life savings to buy all the lottery tickets you can get your hands on, there's still no guarantee you'll win the lottery. Your chances are still 1 in millions. And you'll end up broke and hungry with no back up money to live on.

    All what people are saying on this board is don't blow all your money buy lottery tickets. Spend a few bucks if you want (whatever you can afford), but save the rest.

    You on the other hand are saying "go all out for it, go for broke!"
     
  46. Fee

    Fee Legend

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    A lot of people can get to the 3.5 level in about a year of playing tennis, but many of those same people get stuck there.

    Keep playing as much as you can and working as hard as you can, play some tournaments, try to beat some higher level players, and come back around June 1st 2010 and tell us what your level is then. Most importantly, stay in school.

    You never know, with hard work and a few years of college ball, you could be a successful pro like Travis Parrot, Robert Kendrick, Paul Goldstein, David Sanguinetti, Bobby Reynolds, Sam Warburg, Amer Delic, and countless others who went to college first.
     
  47. nfor304

    nfor304 Banned

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    I don think thats very good advice at all. Its never too late to chase a dream that you have. Look at guys like Moz, he spent like 3 years touring the world playing tennis in his 30's, or even TonLars. TonLars could have stopped playing after college and stopped trying to improve but he's now a better player than he was when in college thanks to his continuing hard work and is good enough to turn pro if he wanted to push for that.

    If you really want something bad enough you can live your dream, or at least find something close to your dream.
     
  48. nfor304

    nfor304 Banned

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    I dont know about you, but if that was me and I was 70 and never got to chase my dream of playing pro basketball.... I would definitely blow my cash trying to become a great player, maybe end up on the national over 70's team or something.

    Better than sitting around in some retirement home wondering what could have been.
     
  49. pabletion

    pabletion Professional

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    Little dude, its not like flight hours or something like that, in which someone can tell you "it takes this amount of time to be a 4.0, this amount to be a 6.0..."
    Like some have said, some reach a certain level and they get stuck and thats it. Most of all its all about commitment, that is, if you have the talent. What are you willing to do to have a shot at tennis? Are you willing to play every day for about 2-4 hours at the least? Go to the gym, joggin, watching your diet, sacrifice partying in excess, going out etc? If you say yes, Id give you a shot, but still, I dont know what natural athletic abilities you posses. I just came in from playin a 13 year old kid (Im 28) who still has the voice of a chip bird... and man does he play. He trains 2 hours daily with a coach and then hits the gym. He goes to ITF tournaments. Hes doing the works. Im not sayin hes gonna make it, cause there are probably hundreds of thousands of kids like him around the world. But if you really wanna find out, you gotta put on the hours, never mind how fast you got your current level. Like anything in life, if you wanna be good you gotta put on the work. Good luck.
     
  50. Mr.Brightside

    Mr.Brightside Rookie

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    Nick Bolletieri says that nothing is impossible.

    I'm kinda in the same boat, been playing for less than two years (no lessons, just taught myself), but many people have told me that I'm around a 4.0-4.5(i have no idea if this is true). I plan to work my ass off physically conditioning and practicing, play college tennis and get a degree so I have something to fall back on, and then try and go pro.

    I'm 15, by the way.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2009

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