P90X 90 minute workout infomercial...any feedback?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by bruinduke, Feb 7, 2008.

  1. bruinduke

    bruinduke New User

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    I keep seeing the infomercial for P90x, an intense dvd series of 90 minute workouts done at home with dumbbells, pull up bar, and space to do the routines. Works with the theory of "muscle confusion", which I guess is a way to keep muscles from plateauing.

    I am a sucker for infomercials so they had me at "hello", but does anyone have any feedback of the pros and cons? A bit worried as I thought I read that dvds like this or hip hop abs caused some recurring charges on some buyers credit card.
     
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  2. lainey80

    lainey80 Semi-Pro

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    I LOVE these dvds! I think it's the best work out I've ever had! I am used to running 4-5 times a week, and being in good shape. Ever since p90x, I can't seem to want to do anything else.
    The Plyometrics is very hard. It's a lot of jump training. I haven't done all the weight lifting videos, mainly because that's not what I'm looking to do, but the one I did do.. OMG.. it's a *****!!!
    If you're looking to stop being lazy this winter and shape up, P90X, is it!
    I'm even looking into getting P90XExtreme, or whatever the next one is after P90x.
    Thanks for asking, I love sharing my P90X experience.:)
     
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  3. krz

    krz Professional

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    I do it and they work. Its NOT easy at all.
     
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  4. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    P90X is solid. It's based on ideas similar to Crossfit (the Crossfit people and the author of P90X are acquainted each with other ) and uses some basic periodization principles.
     
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  5. bruinduke

    bruinduke New User

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    Hey, thanks for the feedback. That's just what I needed to hear.

    Can you get away without having a pull up bar in the house? Don't know if that's a big part of the program or not.
     
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  6. lainey80

    lainey80 Semi-Pro

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    re: need pull up bar?

    Yeah, you don't NEED the pull up bar, to do these. I mostly do plyometrics, ab ripper and yoga. I do other cardio once in a while. I like the chest DVD; that's the only one I've done that really involves weights and the pull-up bar... It KILLED me! OMG that thing's a *****!! all it is is I think an hour of merely pushups, pullups, and repeat! it's a killer!
    Like Tony says, "I hate it, but I love it.";)
     
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  7. migjam

    migjam Professional

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    However, you really need to follow the workout plan. It's all about muscle confusion and pull-ups are a big part of the work out. If you don't have a pull-up bar then you can use bands. But seriously, the workouts are planned in an order and you really need to follow them to get the maximum results. And P90X DOES WORK!
     
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  8. xsuper

    xsuper New User

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    be warned tony horton is kinda gay... well at least it keeps one entertained during the grueling workout.
     
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  9. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    I wouldn't bother with that xbox workout. It looks like a piece of crap to me.
     
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  10. xsuper

    xsuper New User

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    if you dont wanna buy, it is on BT.
    But really, the program just doing regular work out moves that most people know, curls, push up pull ups, except it is much easier to keep pace when you see it in front of you.
    It definitely works.
     
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  11. superman1

    superman1 Legend

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    If tricky says it's solid, then it's solid. The only problem with it is that it costs $$$, and if you took the time you could come up with the routine yourself. That's where they get you - they make it seem like this is some kind of goldmine of knowledge that you can't find anywhere else. But most people need something like this to spell it out for them.

    And you should get a pull-up bar if you don't have one (it's like $20 at overstock or amazon). I doubt this routine has any other back training.
     
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  12. migjam

    migjam Professional

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    It is solid and it really isn't that $$$. What... $140 for 12 hour long dvd's and and nutrition plan book. Where can you get that for cheaper? How much is a personal trainer or a club membership? A heck of a lot more than $140
     
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  13. superman1

    superman1 Legend

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    Personal trainers are not necessary these days thanks to a little thing called Google. Gym memberships can be expensive, but you simply cannot replace the gym for overall strength building. This program might be pretty solid for fat burning, but if muscle building is what you're after, then you absolutely must go to the gym.
     
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  14. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    Agreed. It's all about your GOALS. Most tennis players don't need more muscles, but they do need functional strength. For younger guys who play tennis, those P90x workouts are a good idea, IMHO.

    I prefer the gym though, because I'm a gym rat. I've lived in gyms most of my life. If I don't smell testosterone, I don't think I'm working out! :)

    -Robert
     
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  15. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    It's such ashame that non certified personal trainers gave us such a bad name. A real personal trainer can be extremely beneficial to a novice. Most of my clients came out of my sessions with much more knowledge than average gym rats who had spent many years in the gym. Not only did they learn proper form and the amount of reps and sets, they also learned about nutrition, weight lifting myths, supplements, etc.. Many people knock personal trainers and I did too many years ago, but the truth is that a good trainer can be an invaluable asset.
     
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  16. superman1

    superman1 Legend

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    Oh yeah, I mean if I had a guy like Ano at my gym who wasn't charging anything ridiculous, I'd absolutely want him to be my personal trainer. But most of the trainers I see in the gym helping clients don't seem to know what they're doing. I saw this trainer make a girl do some ridiculous number of reps with almost no weight at all, and I wasn't even sure what she was doing. It was some strange movement with a cable. And the trainers that do know what they're doing don't seem to know any more than I do (they give the same advice that I have read 100 times online), so there's no point for a person willing to do the research and get online and ask Rickson questions.
     
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  17. migjam

    migjam Professional

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    Which is essentially what P90X is doing. It walks the average person through a 90 day program as well as provides them with a nutrition plan.
     
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  18. migjam

    migjam Professional

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    Seriously, all a personal trainer is for is to provide individuals with knowledge and to help keep them on the right track.
     
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  19. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Unfortunately, too many gymrats want to become trainers so they become chummy with the gym owners and get the jobs without certifications. Training yourself is not the way to train a client. These clowns just don't understand that. Pyramid sets and forced reps are for gymrats, not clients. If a trainer needs to spot his client, there's something wrong. A client should not do forced reps no matter what. Clients don't need 3 sets per exercise. All these things are unknown to gymrat trainers so yes, you have to pick and choose wisely, but please don't misjudge all of us because of those poor excuses of trainers who think that just because they workout themselves, they can train anyone else.
     
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  20. migjam

    migjam Professional

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    Or how about overweight trainers?? What is the deal with that? How can they call themselves trainers when their fitness level is poor?
     
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  21. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    One should lead by example, however, I'd rather work with an overweight trainer who is certified and knows what he's doing over a guy who appears fit and gives his clients the same workout routine as his own. Let's do 4 sets of each exercise with forced reps on each set: That kind of trainer is not a trainer.
     
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  22. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    Well, unfortunately that's true.

    Most personal trainers can not even explain to you the difference between scapulo-humeral rhythm, lower crossed syndrome and sub-talar joint disfunction.

    I was on a vacation last December and went to another city.

    At one of my workouts at a Gym, I observed the trainers there.

    I saw one of the “master” trainers having his client perform Romanian Deadlifts.

    In a nutshell, the client looked like the hunchback of Notre Dame. Knee’s shooting forward, no hip extension, and a completely rounded back.

    Even worse, the trainer just stood there watching, counting reps as if everything was as it should be. Matter of fact, the client finished his set, and the trainer said, “good…perfect.”

    I thought to myself two things:

    1. “Wow, if that is what he considers “perfect,” I’d love to see what he considers “bad” form.”

    2. “Who gave this master trainer a certificate as a master trainer?”

    It’s frustrating to be in a field where mediocrity is rampant. Worse yet, the consumer often has no clue. Half the time I want to keep my mouth shut. Who am I to judge other trainers?

    However, the other half feels an obligation to call these trainers out.

    A trainer like that gives Personal Trainers a bad name.
     
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  23. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Ano, although I'm no longer a trainer, I still teach novices to weight training that 1 set of 15 reps per exercise should be done rather than the gymrat's favorite 3 sets per exercise routine. Do you also believe that's a good formula as it's something that NASM developed for beginners. I also do only 1 set of 15 when I come back to weight training after a long layoff, but naturally, my intensity is much higher than a beginner's would be. I go up to 2 sets by my second week back and I sometimes go to 3 after 2 weeks back, but I often just stop at 2 sets.
     
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  24. Ano

    Ano Hall of Fame

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    YES!! I do believe in that formula.
     
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  25. maverick66

    maverick66 Hall of Fame

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    problem with personal trainers in this country is there is very little requrements for them. i always ask for degrees and previous jobs before starting with a trainer. if they cant list off 2-3 teams or athletes they have worked with and have some kind of proof with it then im not gonna work with them. also i want degrees from a trainer. it should be required that trainers have degrees to work. its retarted if you think about how much harm poor trainers can cause to someones health.
     
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  26. migjam

    migjam Professional

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    Thats exactly it. It's hard for an overweight trainer to lead by example regardless of his certification. Just because a person is certified doesn't make them a good trainer. Practice what you preach.
     
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  27. Kevin T

    Kevin T Professional

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    Yep. IMHO, that's why you want an ACSM or CSCS certified trainer because they at least have (an both groups require) a B.S. and the certification process is more rigorous. It's similar to nutrition (my profession). THE ONLY LEGALLY LICENCSED nutrition professionals are REGISTERED DIETITIANS. Not CN's (certified nutritionists) or Clinical Nutritionists (a bogus name if there ever was one) or Licensed Nutritionists (also bogus). These groups license themselves through their own groups and/or conglomerations in alliance with the nutrition supplement industry. Registered Dietitians with the CSSD certification (Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics) have a B.S. and likely an M.S., have >1500 hours documented experience with high school/college/pro athletes and have passed a rigorous board certification exam. Most college/university positions are beginning to require this certification to work with their athletes. Fraud runs rampant in health and fitness.
     
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  28. superman1

    superman1 Legend

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    I'd base it on a few factors. If they're training you for strength, then it's okay if they are fat as long as they themselves are strong. And if they are old, then it doesn't really matter what shape they are in, what matters is their credentials and how well they answer your questions.
     
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  29. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    Oh, this is one of my pet peeves. Likewise for fat teaching tennis pros. Old tennis pros-guys over 60 or so, fine, but when I see a 30 year old teaching pro who is 20 lbs overweight, I can only blanche.

    -Robert
     
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  30. lainey80

    lainey80 Semi-Pro

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    It's P90X, Rickson, and it works.
     
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  31. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    Rickson, Ano - can you expand on the 1 set / 15 reps structure?

    I'm getting back to the gym after a much too long layoff. I usually do 3 sets of 10 - I do my workout like a circuit, and try to keep the rest periods short -between 30-60 secs. Right now I'm doing mostly light weights or body weight exercises and compound movements (squat, Lunge, Push-ups, Lat PD...)

    In the the past, I've seen results using this structure. No I have a LONG road to get back to where I was.
     
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  32. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Striker, this is important for you and don't think it's a rookie move because I'm no rookie and I do the 1 of 15 too after a long layoff. A novice should only do 1 set because his/her body is not yet used to the rigors of 2 or more sets. The 15 reps is the number that NASM came up with to acclimate the novice to the movement, range of motion, and feel of the exercise. Obviously, you don't need to do 15 reps with a weight that's too light for you, but you should use a weight that's not too heavy that you struggle with the last few reps. Use a weight that you can handle, but not too light or heavy. Do the 1 of 15 for about a week or until you've covered every body part, whichever comes first. When you reach the 2nd week, you can move up to 2 sets, but you don't have to do 15 reps per set. After another week, you can do 3 sets, but I would not go beyond 3 sets unless your goal is powerlifting or endurance, both of which are not only completely different from each other, but different from muscle hypertropy as well. Good luck.
     
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  33. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    Thanks Rickson. I generally do a full-body work out, so it looks like 1X15 for this week and maybe 2X10 the next. Don't plan on going beyond 3sets for quite while.
     
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  34. yodudedudeyo

    yodudedudeyo Guest

    ..can i find the p90x set on youtube? haha

    or better yet...bittorrent?
     
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  35. yodudedudeyo

    yodudedudeyo Guest

    no, I'm serious. I'm going to do this starting next week. I just have to get all the gear first. What're the essentials again? 5-25 lb dumbbells and a pull up bar? Optional yoga mat?
     
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  36. migjam

    migjam Professional

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    Actually, you can.

    Pull-up bar (or bands) and I would go 15-45 lb dumbbells, depending on your current strength.
     
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