Paintjob Story On Espn (2004)

Discussion in 'Pros' Racquets and Gear' started by tennisphotog, Aug 8, 2005.

  1. tennisphotog

    tennisphotog Rookie

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    #1
  2. Tennis17ace

    Tennis17ace New User

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    Yep, seen it, but still cool
     
    #2
  3. donnyz89

    donnyz89 Hall of Fame

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    never saw it, always knew about it though, but this solidifies it. good find still.

    im sure a lot of people are still in the dark about this.
     
    #3
  4. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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  5. Fee

    Fee Legend

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    hmmmm....

    I would like the forum to be various shades of purple with silver trim!


    (guess I'm not as powerful as I thought. oh well. ;) )
     
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  6. samster

    samster Legend

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    Good find, good article. Thanks!
     
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  7. Geico

    Geico New User

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    yeah, and then add Safin in there for attempting to continue using his PC600s after signing with Dunlop and you got...
     
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  8. Kalamae

    Kalamae New User

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    cool article... I don't understand why we can't play with pro racquets... maybe it's because real pro racquets are so good that even an intermediate would play like a pro with a customized pro racquet...
     
    #8
  9. ipod-upod

    ipod-upod New User

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    Actually, you can. You just have to look for the older discontinued models that they use. Apparently, the pros either can't or won't adjust to the newer technologies (that are sometimes marketing driven to increase sales, right?). Better get on ****! :mrgreen:
     
    #9
  10. friedalo1

    friedalo1 Semi-Pro

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    Professinal tennis player started with regular racquet that everyone uses. It doesnt matter what a Pro uses. They can beat us with a wood racquet if they wanted too. Pros like Agassi and Roddick are spoiled by the racquet companies. They get free custom racquets. Their just plain spoiled players. Pros are like rock stars, if they want something. They will always get it for free.
     
    #10
  11. vkartikv

    vkartikv Hall of Fame

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    Pros are very precise and fussy when it comes to racquet/string specs, so does a new paintjob not change those specs? Adding paint to a racquet must, most certainly, change the weight of the racquet. And when leading pros are concerned about the smallest nanogram of weight on their racquets, how does a paintjob affect this?
     
    #11
  12. Jonnyf

    Jonnyf Legend

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    It doesn't i think (would like to know though) they DON'T re-paint it they paint it from scratch with that PJ so when safin changed from I prestige pj to LM pj he just stopped using his i prestige pj as a new shipment arrived from head with the new PJ
     
    #12
  13. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Yeah, they don't RE-PAINT the racquets. They just paint the bare racquets with the new model's paintjob and graphics to begin with at the factory. Besides, I don't think a thin layer of paint adds all that much weight anyway.
     
    #13
  14. Bora

    Bora Semi-Pro

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    That's right, and if they had to they could always strip the paint and decals and repaint.
     
    #14
  15. Tennisaurus

    Tennisaurus Rookie

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    Shameful practice

    I hadn't been "in-the-know" until I started reading these boards and the article. This is a blatant deceptive practice. I agree that some consumer group should address this. The public is being deliberately misled to sell the latest iteration of a racket.

    In the article the national sales manager of Yonex is engaging in some serious b.s. spin : "Derrick Applegate, national sales manager for Yonex's racket sports division, said he doesn't believe consumers are being misled that they are buying the same racket players use in tournaments "as long as the player is using the same brand."

    But it isn't only the company that is deceiving the public, its the player, as well who agrees to it. When it comes to making a buck, the consumer is lied to and treated like a patsy. Very disappointing.

    Lost respect for both the racket companies and the player shills that engage in this practice. (Eliot Spitzer, where are you?)

    As they say "caveat emptor".

    Anyone have a list of 1.) who engages in this 2.) the racket they really use and 3.) the racket they are marketing they use, but they don't?
     
    #15
  16. ichugtea

    ichugtea New User

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    Probably the racquet companies would argue that they are not selling some inferior products while marketing for ones with superior quality. Nobody gets hurt. Most buyers would not tell the difference between a new model racquet and the one that is, in fact, older model with a paint job, even if after they swing them. And pro players customize their racquets based on their personal preferences; the racquets are still different from the ones that are off-the-shelf. The racquets being marketed now will eventually be used by pro players in the future, so they are probably better racquets, but not yet recognized.

    My view to this practice is that what those racquet companies and players did was wrong. That’s false advertisement. The buyers and fans are not only paying a good quality racquet, but also a huge premium to the belief that they are getting racquets of the same model as pros’, but in fact, are not. The consumers are deliberately deceived and misled, from which the racquet companies and those players are sharing big profit. I admire those players refuse to do so because it is so easy for them to say yes. the fact that they have beening doing this for a while and people are getting used to it does not make it right. At lease, those companies should stop doing this market practice. I am not surprised if they are getting sued.
     
    #16
  17. expos8888

    expos8888 New User

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    I new it!!!

    see I use an old Rossignol from the 90's.

    The racquets today are made for week school boys and have no feel. I knew none of those guys would be using those mass produced toys.
     
    #17
  18. johncauthen

    johncauthen Semi-Pro

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    This story is a first-hand account of deception in the racquet industry. In 1993 I wrote to Head telling them that the racquets Pete Sampras used were nothing like the racquets anyone else was using. They have a lot more weight added to the top of the handle. At that time they were adding 3½ ounces of extra weight to the top of the handles of Pete Sampras’ racquets! I know, because I developed the weighting technique, and showed it to Wilson in April 1988.

    Here is a picture of the racquet I showed to Wilson with this weighting technique. That racquet weighs 14 ounces and it has 1½ ounces of tape above the grip.

    [​IMG]

    Here is a Prince Pro modified the same way. It has less weight at the top of the grip and weighs 374 grams.

    [​IMG]

    That weighting has a remarkable benefit on player’s games. I gave a modified racquet to a girl on the Rock Hill, South Carolina, Winthrop College tennis team in November 1987. She had lost two straight matches at Love, and was losing a practice match, 0-4. I had never seen her win a game, but she hit with abandon and looked good. She took my racquet and won the first game I had ever seen her win. When I gave it to her, I thought my racquet would tame her game. I knew at that moment, after she won with it, I had something. In April 1988, I saw Jim Baugh at Wilson and showed him two of my racquets. Jim Baugh has just started working their and was the Marketing Director.

    Wilson told me they weren't interested in my idea. That was after testing it for two weeks while I waited in a motel in River Grove. Lots of extra weight at the top of the grip change the way you swing the racquet. That summer I saw Stefan Edberg at Wimbledon, on TV, and it looked like he had my weighting concept in his racquets.

    I went to Prince with the modified Pro in 1989. Steve Davis, also the Marketing Director at that time, gave me a Graduate Prototype to modify. I could not make the Graduate work by adding weight where I added it to the aluminum Pro. I never sent the racquet back.

    I learned more about my weighting. Here is a weight that if I had added it to the Graduate, it would have made it work.

    [​IMG]

    You can see the weight can be very extreme, very heavy. In 1990 Pete Sampras won the US Open, and I heard his racquets weighed 460 grams. I suspected Stefan Edberg had my weighting, but after hearing about the weight of Sampras’s racquet, 16.2 ounces, I KNEW Wilson was using my idea. (The racquets Jack Kramer and Don Budge used weighed 16 ounces. The racquets Suzanne Lenglen used weighed 15 ounces. I was inspired to modify a modern racquet this way by a 1920's racquet, and showed it to Wilson when I was satisfied with my prototypes.)

    A week before the 1993 US Open, Sampras let Aaron Krickstein use some of his racquets and Krickstein liked them so much he borrowed some of Sampras’ racquets to play the Open. But when Krickstein wanted to use the racquet, Wilson would not let him!

    Then, as I said at the beginning, I wrote to Head and told them about the weighting in Sampras racquets that no on else could get, not even Krickstein.

    I wrote to Head and said look at the weighting in Sampras' racquets. Robert Marte answered my letters. We each wrote three letters, six in all.

    But Head didn’t answer my seventh letter. Agassi got this weighting and won the US Open, unseeded. He started winning, dominating Sampras, using the same weighting Sampras had.

    They temporarily took the weighting away from Agassi, who fell to 141 and blamed his racquets. He was ridiculed for blaming his racquets, but it was actually true. Now, Agassi uses a lesser performing version of it. So does Safin, who had it when he won the US Open. Ivanisevic had it when he won Wimbledon.

    You can’t get these racquets, and there really are racquets that make pros play better. They also make average players play better. I feel that only Federer is being given this style of racquet today. Of the women, Davenport and the Williams sisters have them. It is the biggest scandal in sports.
     
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  19. Joe12

    Joe12 Semi-Pro

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    Wow. Really?
     
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  20. shsman2091

    shsman2091 Rookie

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    Hey John, would you mind modifying a racquet for me with your weighting system? I'll even pay, give me your price. I can be reached at saad24@msn.com .
     
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  21. VGP

    VGP Legend

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    Weighting rackets is no big secret. Your story makes you sound dilusional. If you really thought you had something, you should have put in for a patent application instead of shopping your idea around with the racket companies.
     
    #21
  22. Joe12

    Joe12 Semi-Pro

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    Get some lead tape and put it under where the throat becomes the shaft. If you like it, put it under the grip so it looks neat, if you don't take it off.
     
    #22
  23. Joe12

    Joe12 Semi-Pro

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    I have been saying this for a long time too. And some people say making a paintjob costs up to $500. I don't see why painting a Prestige Classic mold into a Liquidmetal Prestige should cost any more (as in paint, labour costs, etc.) than painting a Liquidmetal Prestige mold into a painted Liquidmetal Prestige.
     
    #23
  24. johncauthen

    johncauthen Semi-Pro

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    Okay, that’s what most racquet adjusters do now, but as I showed in the photos, I am talking about adding one or two ounces. Lead tape adds a few grams.

    The industry tells you their racquets are designed to be light overall and head heavy.

    By head heavy, they mean about 5 extra grams in the head. Small amounts of weight in the head can dramatically change the feel of the head. The Wilson NCode Six-One is a perfect example. Pick it up, and almost anyone says it feels heavy. But they say pros like heavy racquets.

    Not exactly true: pros like heavy racquets, but they don’t like for them to feel heavy. If Wilson adds 5 or 10 extra grams to the head of the production Six-One, it is impossible to add two ounces to the top of the handle and the racquet is usable, by anyone.

    In order to modify the racquet like Sampras’ racquets, they have to make the head so light it is unusable without the extra weight in the handle. You can’t modify any of the current production racquets using my technique, and sell them, although the older racquets, such as the Rossignol, which is actually from the 80's, could be modified.

    The Rossignol has a lighter head and heavier handle, and while it is heavier overall, a lot of people prefer that feel, including most pros. The racquet industry is trying to progress toward the light handle and heavy head theory. Every new racquet is a little closer to that theory; but a lot of pros and regular players prefer the old racquets.

    I had maxed out the opposite theory: light head -- heavy handle, and showed it to Wilson. They maxed it out even further by giving Sampras a racquet with a super light head and super heavy handle, so that his racquet actually weighed 16.2 ounces, but had an extremely light head. I can’t produce that racquet without being a racquet company, but I have a special Babalot called a VS Drive that weighs 243 grams strung, with a super light head. It is unusable when unmodified. I guess it was designed for players who modify their racquets. It was called VS Drive, and is no longer available. I have one. I modified it with 61 grams of lead at the top of the handle, that’s 2.2 ounces.

    There is a funny story. An 11-year-old walked up to me when I was hitting at the wall outside my apartment. He asked if he could try what I was doing. It looked like fun. I was slamming the ball into the wall. I gave him that Babolat. He wouldn’t stop, as he spent about 15 minutes hitting, and started to look like a pro, even though he had never played tennis. He asked his father to buy him a racquet. I saw him again with his new racquet, but he was not looking like a pro, and getting angry, throwing the new racquet. I never saw him again.

    With my racquet, he loved tennis. With a proper new racquet, he hated tennis. If I sound delusional it is because I can’t get anyone in the industry to work with me, or believe me.

    The whole thing about painted racquets is the industry trying to sell people on what they think works best, which is ultra light racquets with slightly heavier heads than normal. But as was said, those racquets have less feel. The best idea is to use the scientific theories the industry has developed, and produce racquets like that 304 gram Babolat I have.
     
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  25. Jonnyf

    Jonnyf Legend

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    Can you not work out a small modern weight change please and e-mail me please i'll even send a few dollars paypal if it works lol
    forrest.jonny@gmail.com
    thanks so much
     
    #25
  26. johncauthen

    johncauthen Semi-Pro

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    This simple weight change seems somewhat cursed. You hear regular tennis players talking about a big deception in the racquet industry. It is true; it's really there.

    After I exchanged several letters with Head, they agreed to meet me at the Super Show and talk in person. When I got there, they left no credentials for me to get in. But I had been talking to Paul Kidd at ProKennex. I called him and he got me in. Every time I went to the Head booth, I could not get an appointment. I explained the whole thing, the fact that they had invited me there. Finally it was over, and I never talked to Head.

    The racquet has to be precise. 5 extra grams in the head, and it won’t work. From 1990, Sampras used a 1970-era Pro Staff with no head guard. The headguard weighs about 5 grams. They tried to get him to add weight to his racquethead, but he refused to let them, and they said, “Sampras is a spoiled child when it comes to racquets.”

    But I did get through to Head with letters they answered. They made some racquets according to this weighting theory. The racquet has to be designed for this weighting from head to butt by the racquetmaker. You can't convert a racquet that has been designed according to another weighting concept. All the parameters are too narrow.

    Agassi got the Head version of the racquet, thanks to my letters, even though Head would not talk to me at the Super Show. Agassi and Sampras started having amazing matches.

    That made tennis insiders mad. They thought tennis was becoming a different game because of power baseline play. It was becoming different, but it was a better and more popular game. They forced Head to take the racquet away from Agassi – that cannot be documented – what can be documented is they made a rule in 1995 that said racquets can’t be 16 ounces.

    That meant they changed Sampras racquets in 1995, adding the head guard, making the head heavier. That’s when Nate Ferguson started setting them up, making them 14 ounces instead of 16 ounces. But we can remember the weird tennis Sampras played after 1995, nearly losing to qualifiers ranked in the 300’s: things like that. They were trying to change what was working in order to reduce the power game in tennis.

    I got a job as a stringer in a famous tennis shop, Don's Tennis in Charlotte, 9 months ago.

    I know the feel of racquets, and did extensive experimenting with stringing, stringing almost a thousand racquets so far. I learned how to make all the current racquets work by precisely adjusting head length. My racquets that I string work better than people expect them to. But Don is supposed to be the local racquet master. When people come in and say, “This racquet is wonderful! It has never hit this well before!” Don cringes. A woman said yesterday, after testing two demos, “I hit with another player’s racquet. The ball was doing everything it was supposed to do. Springing off the strings, I really liked it.” Don cringed again. He said to me, “I can’t control my shots with your racquets. They are cannons. I can’t allow you to string racquets different from me.” Most other players say my racquets have more power as well as more control; and I say they are supposed to be cannons: that’s the idea. The tennis industry is doing the same thing that Don is doing to me. They think a player is not supposed to go from second tier junior to world-beater and back to second tier player because of the racquet; then win the US Open with ease, and then retire and never play again like Sampras. His racquet must be dangerous, they have to discontinue it. And they did.

    Rich Janes designed the original 1970’s Pro Staff. I talked to him on the phone when he had a job with Penn. I think he got a job with Babolat and designed the first Pure Drive. The Pure Drive is very similar to the first Pro Staff. It has a lot of thickness up the shaft. I have one Babolat with a light head. In every way it is just like a 1970’s Pro Staff. I added 2.2 ounces to the top of the grip, like Sampras' racquets, and kids and old ladies like it.

    In Sampras’ Pro Staff, they could have lightened the butt half of the handle and made it weigh 12 ounces, easy, with 3½ ounces at the top of the grip. It would have had the same performance.

    My one Babolat is the same design and only weighs 249 grams strung. (I just weighed it.) It has the same light head and overall design as the 1975 Pro Staff. I think the same man designed it, Rich Janes, but it uses modern weight saving technology. When I added a lot of weight to the top of the handle, like Sampras' racquets, it still weighed under 11 ounces, and a kid loved it; so did a 50-year-old lady: threatening the myth that says average players can't play with racquets that can be used successfully by pros.

    I can't add the same weight, or a lighter version of it to any current racquets, and have average players like them.

    I can string current racquets making them work better than expected. People like my racquets, but I am about to be fired by Don because he can’t tolerate a stringer who is better than he is in his shop, even though one customer after another praises racquets I have strung. I am about to lose a job. It isn’t that great a job, making $8 per racquet when I was the one who showed Wilson the weighting concept that dominates tennis. I am not really mad about that, in fact, I like the fact I have done all of this. My life is not bad, but I have to work with other experts to make my ideas work. I am not good enough to do it by myself. That could mean working for ProKennex. I talked to Paul Kidd about working for Pro Kennex, at the Super Show in 1994, but nothing happened.

    Later that year, 1994, Agassi changed tennis and made it much more popular, using ideas in his racquets that I had told to Head. Head wouldn’t talk to me in person.
     
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  27. shsman2091

    shsman2091 Rookie

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    Can you please tell me where I can get one of your weight modified racquets, or can you please modify one for me. I'm willing to pay $$. Also, I have a question. Didn't Sampras put 5 strips of lead tape on the head of his racquets?
     
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  28. shsman2091

    shsman2091 Rookie

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    Another question, if I get a racquet that is 12 pts head light, and weighs 11.4 oz, how much leadtape would I have to the top of the handle to make it modified based on your weighting system? For example, I can get a roll of leadtape, so how many inches of it would I have to put on top of the handle? Or is it impossible to modify this type of racquet? And if so, is there any possible way I can get a racquet modified based on your weighting system? Thanks in advance John.
     
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  29. johncauthen

    johncauthen Semi-Pro

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    Hopefully, Don and I can work together to provide the best possible racquets, nationwide. But it doesn't look like that small businessman is going to take any advise from anyone. I believe I have come to hate independent cottage industry people, who only want to do their own thing, and can't see the big picture. I may have lost faith in individuality; and now, I wish large corporations who only want to do what makes sense and provide the best possible product would take over.

    If I could work with a large corporation, we could provide these racquets to you.
     
    #29
  30. shsman2091

    shsman2091 Rookie

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    Ok, now for my other question, if Pete Sampras put 5 strips of lead tape on both sides of his head, than doesn't this contradict your weight theory? Because it is indeed safe to say he did put lead tape, and according to many including TW, 5 strips of it. So, doesn't that add weight to the head and contradict your theory?
     
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  31. johncauthen

    johncauthen Semi-Pro

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    The ideal head has weight in the middle because it has weight naturally at the top and bottom. So you can make the head ultra light, then add weight to the middle and it is still light, but well-balanced, because it is good to have extra weight in the middle of the head to make up for the natural weight of the string bridge and the top of the bow.

    Those are things only a racquet company can do. You can't fiddle with racquets much, making them much different from the way they are made. But you can do a lot if you start from scratch.

    If the racquet has all of its weight and power in the top of the handle, it is much easier to control than if the weight is out in the head. That is a theory that sounds good, which I demontrated to Wilson. I made it work. But for some reason the tennis industry is trying to give people new racquets every year that are the exact opposite of what I demonstrated. The new racquets are racquets people don't like as much as they liked their old ones. And with paint jobs on pro racquets, the industry is hiding the fact that people don't like the new racquets. The industry says, "You will begin to like the new racquets. The next generation of pros will use the new racquets."

    Why not give people what they like? Why discontinue or change a model that a lot of people use, and not make the old one available? Why is this so common?

    What serious business is run this way?
     
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  32. shsman2091

    shsman2091 Rookie

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    So wouldn't a custom built racquet from Vantage that is 11.7 ounces and 12 pts head light be using your recommended weight distribution method. I mean, if it weighs that much unstrung, and is 12pts headlight, isn't most of the weight in the handle, thus defining your weighting method? And if not, can't you slap a lot of lead tape on right on top of the handle to make it work?
     
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  33. johncauthen

    johncauthen Semi-Pro

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    Well, try it and see if it makes your racquet better. It sounds similar to an old racquet. Weight there might improve it a lot. Add more and more weight to see if it keeps improving. I have shaped the weight and the shape is important.

    I am working on a product, and I have already contacted someone to make it that you can tape onto the top of the grip (put an overgrip over it) and it improves racquet performance. I am a perfectionist, and so far I haven't decided to manufacture the part. I'm still tinkering with it. My goal was to have it by the Super Show, but it won't make that. An early version of it is what you see in the photo of the Prince Shark. The current version weighs just under one ounce, 27 grams. It's very conservative in its weight, but makes the racquet feel more solid and gives it more ball control. Good players like it; average players think it makes the racquet heavy. I'm still tinkering. I want average players to like it.
     
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  34. johncauthen

    johncauthen Semi-Pro

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    Your custom racquet really does sound like the old racquets that aren't being manufactured anymore. You like it. Why do you think they won't make a racquet like that?

    Why do those racquets have to be custom racquets? Why not offer one racquet that is balanced very head light, and works?

    I mean, just making it head light isn't the solution, but making it head light and it works is. That sounds like it should be a popular racquet. You like it, or you wouldn't have bought it. If you were a contract player, why would the tennis industry paint that racquet like a current head heavy production model? Why not make that racquet?
     
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  35. johncauthen

    johncauthen Semi-Pro

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    I looked up Vantage on the web. My modified Prince O3 Red is almost exactly the same as your prebuilt Vantage. Mine is balanced at 310mm, yours is at 305. My O3 Red is 334g. Your racquet is 330g according to the website.

    I just bought the O3 Red a week ago, and I feel it has a huge amount of potential. Maybe there will be a truly good racquet, modified from a production racquet. The Gold O3 Tour is also great. It feels like last year's orange and black Dunlop 300G, only better.

    Sorry if this has gotten off subject, but I think there is hope. There is going to be a backlash to modern super light, head heavy racquets that pros won't use, and most players don't like as much as their old racquets.
     
    #35
  36. Sinner

    Sinner Professional

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    and does this increased weight in the grip have an affect on the player's wrist/elbow/arm?
     
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  37. shsman2091

    shsman2091 Rookie

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    Thanks for the responses John, I think I have really learned a lot, and have a new perspective on things now. I'm looking forward to the release of that weight for the handle, hope it comes out soon. Again, thanks.
     
    #37
  38. powten

    powten New User

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    Are you meaning that the ideal place to put lead tape is the top of the grip? Why should it be better than the bottom of the grip? I understand that putting it in the handle is better, but why at the top of it?

    Moreover, what does this system bring you? Maneuvrability? More power because of the added weight?
     
    #38
  39. sunflowerhx

    sunflowerhx Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2005
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    Location:
    Bangkok
    Hi johncauthen

    Can you tell me what kind of tape you use to add 1½ ounces above the grip?
    Normal lead tapes are far too light.

    Thanks

    PS 6.0 95
    PS Tour 90
     
    #39
  40. papasito

    papasito New User

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2006
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    32
    I have been playing tennis since I was 8 years old, or nineteen and a half years. I read a lot of the threads here and the reason I did it is that I also have encountered differences in the racquets of the past and the ones they started producing during the early nineties. I used to play with Dunlop MAX 200G and I loved it from the first time I hit a ball with it! I am talking about the racquet that was used by world's former #1 John McEnroe and world's former #1 Steffi Graf. To the best of my knowledge, this racquet is the one that has won more grand slam titles than any other racquet to this day. I am not 100% sure about that so do not get fired up about it... But anyway, I personally think that this is the best tennis racquet ever made and I have hard time understanding why Dunlop stop manufacturing it. I asked an executive of Dunlop in Greenville, South Carolina and his answer was that the technology they used to make this racquet was very expensive. I personally do not believe that statement. They use so much for research and developement for new models and all the new technologies that they use, but yet they cannot afford to produce such a great and proven tennis racquet? I do not think so. As a matter of fact, I read an article where John McEnroe himself said that Dunlop MAX 200G was an amazing racquet. I never heard or read about his saying that about any other racquet. Actually, the tennis coach at the university where I took my bachelor degree told me that one day in the past, before McEnroe was using the MAX 200G, he practiced with his brother who was beating him badly... Than John decided to try his brother's racquet and never put it down since!!! Anyway, I started telling this story, because I wanted to share my experience with you. I happend to accomplish a lot during the years when I was using the Dunlop MAX 200G in my country of origin which is Bulgaria, Europe. For example, I became a national champion for my age group and at the age of 15 I reached the quarters for men, defeating ATP players. All that until I broke two of my racquets and I had to look for more. I then, realized that the Dunlop MAX 200G was discontinued and I had to switch my tennis racquet. I was given the opportunity to get a contract with Head due to my good results as a junior. I took the Head Prestige Classic and tested it. The first time I hit the ball it went straight to the curtain in the tennis hall where we practiced that day. I hit the ball exactly the same way I was hitting with my MAX 200G, but I had no touch whatsoever with the new racquet. The string tension was right, but it just felt completely different. Since that day I am in search for the racquet that will give me feeling and performance at least close to the one I got from the Dunlop MAX 200G, but it seems like something is going on in the world of tennis racquet manufacturers and they no longer produce true players racquets or I suddenly lost my abilities to play good tennis that day, 12 years ago... The difference is so big that since then I have lost against players whom I used to beat with ease and never lose a set against. I just can't get that feeling, control, and comfort that Dunlop MAX 200G gave me. The only racquet that came close to that was a racquet that was bought from a Yugoslavian ex-tennis pro and was made especially for him and was some version of the Puma that Boris Becker used. That racquet had that soft feeling and control that I was used to getting from the MAX 200G or at least close to it. I had played with many of the big brand's tennis racquets of the modern era (after 1990), for example Volkl C7 (had a contract with Volkl), Fischer Vacuum Michael Shtich, Dunlop Revelation 200G, Dunlop Muscle Weave 200G, Wilson Hyper Carbon, Head Radical (Red and silver), Wilson Hammer, Volkl C10, and others, but none of them came even close to the feeling and performance the MAX 200G provided me with. Now I am using the Dunlop M-FIL 200 which in some way reminds me of the MAX 200G, but it is still not as good. I guess that the improvement of the new model is due to the recent help that the company got from John McEnroe in designing their racquets. I also remember that before the MAX 200G I used to play with an aluminum Head with a long body and small round head which was not bad at all. I cannot claim if it was an amazing racquet though, because I was too young and had not achieved anything significant with it at the time, except for being one of the top ranked kids in my country for my age group. I personally think that I have lost a lot of joy and victories due to my switching to a different racquet and my disability to find one that had the features of the old professional tennis racquets from the eighties. I am talking about weight, frame stifness, ballance. This has being bothering me since then and I just can't stand it sometimes. I played for a German tennis club for two years and for an Austrian tennis club for two more years. While I was playing in Germany, I bought two of the Dunlop MAX 200G racquets which I keep to this day. I still hit with them every now and then and they prove to be better than anything else, every time I try them. To me, Dunlop MAX 200G was revolutionary for the time when it was invented and that is why it was inducted into the museum of technological innovations. The truth is, I do not care about the material of the racquet or any other feature, I just want to get the feeling and response from it like I did with the MAX 200G and some other older and heavier racquets to a certain extent. Obviously, I want too much... None of the tennis racquet manufacturers is able to produce that successful combination anymore and sell it to the public. To me, they should be ashamed of this fact! I personally think that my tennis life was ruined because of that. Well, who am I and who cares about me and others like, right...?Cheers! If anyone knows of a solution to my problem, my e-mail address is tenisista@yahoo.com
     
    #40
  41. Marius_Hancu

    Marius_Hancu G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    could you edit your text and insert some paras for readability?
    as it is, it's like a big blob ...
     
    #41
  42. Bill Tilden

    Bill Tilden New User

    Joined:
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    82
    jhon say the truth

    Phisically jhon say th
     
    #42
  43. Bill Tilden

    Bill Tilden New User

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2006
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    82
    from racuet research

    hould Your Racquet Be Head-Heavy or Head-Light?

    Head-light is better, no question. A head-light racquet (balance point closer to the hand than the midpoint of the racquet's length), has significantly lower Moment, resultant forces from impact (Torque and Impulse Reaction), Shock, Work, Shoulder Pull, Shoulder Crunch, Wrist Crunch, and Elbow Crunch. And it can have high mass (M) and high swingweight (I), but low Moment, with a handle end counterweight. That's good, remember.

    In the formulas, the key variable is r (the mass center radius, or the distance from the axis of rotation to the balance point). Head-light balance means that r is small. When r is small, r2 will be tiny, and the key coefficient in the formulas, Mr2/I (which, as astute students will note, is equal to r / q because q = I / Mr) in the formulas for Torque and Shock, will be small, which is good. The linear velocity of the mass center is critical, and when the mass center is close to the hand (small r), its linear velocity (v) in rotation will be smaller than when it is distant. A distant mass center goes much faster in rotation -- remember the carousel at the playground? So head-light is the smart choice. Head-light (low r) with a high sweet spot (high q) is the really smart choice for reducing the risk of tennis elbow. That means a racquet with a large handle end weight (~5 ounces). This handle end weight customization produces significant improvement: check this.

    An important additional benefit of head-light balance is that Moment is less, so the racquet is easier to position for volleys and returns, and is not so heavy to hold up all afternoon. Moreover, with a low Moment, the Torsion from impact will be small, so the racquet will be easy on the elbow. Head-heavy racquets, on the other hand, increase the risk of tennis elbow because of their high Moment and high Torque (therefore high Torsion), their high Elbow Crunch, and their high Shock.
     
    #43
  44. Bill Tilden

    Bill Tilden New User

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    is it a strange handle?

    I have do this photo in rome in occasion of the master series. it was the 3.5.2005, i think.

    Safin to serve and his racquet fly in the oder part of the curt, but the handle?? it is in the hand but you can see is not broken in the second photo. Something looks take off from the handle.

    Safin looks to think: What strange handle?
     
    #44
  45. Bill Tilden

    Bill Tilden New User

    Joined:
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    opps

    naturally the photo are under copyrigth
     
    #45
  46. Bill Tilden

    Bill Tilden New User

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2006
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    82
    ...........................................................
     
    #46
  47. Bill Tilden

    Bill Tilden New User

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    82
    I have delete the photo, sorry!
     
    #47
  48. diggler

    diggler Professional

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    #48
  49. JohnMatrix

    JohnMatrix New User

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2006
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    99
    WAIIIIIITTTTTTTTTT a second here MISTER.......so you gave old Petey one last set of badass rackets for the '03 US OPEN so he could win it right?
    I saw sampras on a warm-up court one time when Wilson took away his racquet privileges and he looked like he was playing with his left hand he was so horrible
     
    #49
  50. tennis playa

    tennis playa Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Messages:
    187
    rackets

    on the subject of rackets, are pros really as demanding as we are led to believe? I've been playing for years and I've always thought that the most important aspect of a racket in terms of comfort is the grip, if a frame has the right size grip I can play with anything, after that I try new strings and differing tensions but by and large if I can play with anything so should the pros and yeah I know folks are going to say this and that but it's all relative baby. The reality is tennis is tennis, the only difference is that the pro's can and will hit the ball consistently harder than I can and maybe make less errors. There's nothing to say that they have more control over their shots and just as a little aside, in 1982 when McEnroe was filming an ad for his new Dunlop frame, he was asked to hit a ball more or less right at the camera as a kind of punctuation to end the ad, he was given a target to aim at to give the illusion that the ball would be coming straight at the viewer, know how many takes it took to hit the target...almost 20.
     
    #50

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