Plantar Fasciitis, Anyone??

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by user92626, Dec 13, 2012.

  1. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Anyone developed planta fasciitis which is a heel pain? Do you know how you developed it and how you cured it? .

    I dont' know whether mine came from tennis or cycling. The timing of it points to cycling, but the info indicates a tear might have been resulted from pronating, suprinating your foot which we do substantially in tennis.

    Thanks, guys
     
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  2. treblings

    treblings Hall of Fame

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    the one thing that finally, after months of pain, worked for me was taping the sole of the foot. found that technique in ´runners world´
    the whole episode happened more than 15 years ago, so i´m uncertain on how-to do it
     
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  3. TCF

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    Last edited: Dec 16, 2012
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  4. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    There have been some very good TW threads. Search - plantar fasciitis

    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=398706&highlight=plantar+fasciitis

    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=371446&page=2 See reply #38 for life style discussion.

    I believe that life style issues can be very important. If much of what we do is done with the calves shortened they may become short & tight. Short & tight calves may contribute to problems in the linked muscle-tendon chain consisting of

    1) Calf muscles
    2) Achilles tendon
    3) Achilles attachments
    4) Plantar Fascia on the bottom of the foot. The most common site of plantar fasciitis is just in front of the heel (see Heelspur link in TW threads above).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantar_fascia

    Stretching tissue that is still injured(?) is very questionable. Most targeted exercises are intended for conditioning to reduce injury risk and not for physical therapy. That issue belongs with a Dr and physical therapist.

    Be aware that there are two calf muscles, the Gastrocnemius and the Soleus. Separate stretches are required for each calf muscle. Search TW threads for Soleus stretch, etc.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2012
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  5. ChipNCharge

    ChipNCharge Professional

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    Have you recently gained weight? I got PF after I had gained some weight. The PF went away after I lost the weight.
     
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  6. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    No thanks, I'll pass.
     
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  7. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    r2473, lol..you'r always hilarious!

    ChipN,
    Is it possible if you only gain like 5 lbs or less?

    I also thought it was my old shoes so I changed them right away. Didn't help.

    Thanks, guys.
    I'm going to try to lose weight and stretch more.

    I'm surprised that this isn't as common as TE. Tennis is also very hard on your feet, especially with only hardcourts available in the US.
     
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  8. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

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    Had it... it was the worst... no thanks!!
     
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  9. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Can you share how it was the worst for you? What did you do to get over it?
     
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  10. Sumo

    Sumo Semi-Pro

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    I've gotten it twice. Once during soccer season, once during rugby season.

    The soccer episode wasn't too bad. Hurt like hell when I woke up in the morning or sat at my desk for a while, but went away with by walking around and I never missed any time. Eventually it just disappeared without me doing anything.

    The one from rugby was awful. I couldn't walk at all in the morning, and started using a chair as a cane to get around the house. For this, I did a lot of stretching, rolled the arch of my foot over tennis balls, golf balls, frozen 20oz bottles, and massaged the area whenever I was sitting on the couch. This helped, but it never really went away until I had to play a game because we didn't have any subs. Warmed up without any problems, played the whole game expecting to be a cripple again in the morning, but woke up the next day and felt fine. Haven't had any problems since.
     
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  11. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Mine has been going on for 5 weeks or so and some mornings I need to hop on one foot. Iwas hoping that one day it'd go away like yours did, Sumo.

    In the last doubles I hit a crappy FH and I anticipated a short volley from opponent by slowly moving up. But he volleyed the ball deep behind me and I did a 360 turn on the injured foot to retrieve the shot.. Wow what a pain! It was like I walked on hot coal. :shock:
     
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  12. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    Some cases are quite chronic. A colleague of my wife has been hobbled for several years by it, has a very affluent husband so she's been to all the the top experts in the NYC area and has had no luck making it better. I hope you've given up sports entirely while this is going on. More important still is what you wear on your feet the rest of the time -- workday shoes need to have soft crepe-like soles.
     
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  13. Qubax

    Qubax Professional

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    I swear by SOLE inserts.

    yoursole.com

    they have some very good Plantar fasciitis reviews
     
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  14. dak95_00

    dak95_00 Professional

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    I've had it on and off for nearly 10 years now and mostly on. Right now, I'm mostly pain free or the pain is very minimal so I don't notice it like when it was at its absolute worst last year at this time.

    PF is an overuse injury. I got mine from the stress of running. I wish I would've just stopped all activity and rested back 10 years ago instead of aggravating it worse. TIME OFF IS THE BEST CURE!!!! To take time off, you'll also need to tape your heal/arch. There are many videos on youtube, etc that'll detail how to do it.

    How did I become nearly pain free? I took time off. I wear custom orthotics and never walk barefoot except in the shower. I stretch often. This website saved me at my darkest hour with new stretches and more information: http://injuredrunner.com/injury_region/foot/foot_plantars.htm

    Good luck. Do it right now so you won't have to live with it much longer. Take time off. If it were me and I could go back 10 years, I'd gladly take 4-6 months off to save myself from 8 more years of agony! I dream of walking barefoot again but I know it'll never happen. Read that website above and follow the instructions.
     
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  15. Bobby Jr

    Bobby Jr Legend

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    This is basically the approach I used to get over my own PF > a dedicated, daily routine of stretching exercises, mostly for the calf muscles.

    When I started I was having trouble walking in the mornings my feet hurt that much. Relief started to come within days of starting a stretching routine.

    Re: night boots. I never tried them but I did shift down in my bed on a few occasions so my feet were flat against the end board. I actually seemed to help somewhat. I'd sometimes wake up and they'd still be flat against them.
     
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  16. NE1for10is?

    NE1for10is? Semi-Pro

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    Had it and got over it with all below, but it takes a while and requires patience and regular attention before it will go away:

    -Professional deep tissue massage

    -High quality orthotics fitted to your foot

    -Regular and consistent stretching of hamstrings and calves:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5si3Pjmnddo

    -Always use shoes that lace up to provide lateral support to the arch. Until it goes away, don't use flip-flops, loafers or any other shoe that doesn't lace up.
     
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  17. jdubbs

    jdubbs Hall of Fame

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    Custom insoles. Cost me like 400 bucks. Worth every penny.
     
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  18. Mike Hodge

    Mike Hodge Rookie

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    Had it off and on since I turned 40ish. When I started playing tennis a few years ago, it really surged.

    I recommend good insoles and a good stretching program --- not just the feet and calves, but the hamstrings low back and hips.

    The more flexible you are, the more efficient you'll move, which should result in less wear and tear on your body. Bio-mechanics, IMO, can be a big part of PF.
     
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  19. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    Had it, but thankfully not too serious a case.

    My technique for curing it involved changing shoes for a better fit, rest, stretching my calves, and wearing Crocs around until I could exercise my feet.

    The big difference with what I did and orthodox advice is after the pain was mostly gone, I went barefoot as much as possible. I found that supportive shoes, much like a cast, weaken your feet and help contribute to PF by lifting the heel which doesn't allow full flexibility of the calve muscle. I've had no problems since. YMMV.
     
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  20. Povl Carstensen

    Povl Carstensen Legend

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    I had 2 months of it around september, all gone now. I used a homemade J-shaped heel insert to relieve the area it originated from, stretches, and massage with a fysio type of ball (dont know what it is called). Also had to stop running and tennis. I do not know whether it would have gone away by itself, but probably these things sped up the recovery.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2012
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  21. colowhisper

    colowhisper Semi-Pro

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    I have semi custom insoles too, what an epiphany not only for this condition but for improved footwork. Also, I am surprised that the recommendation for yoga does not come up more often on threads like this. Modern day "power yoga" is no longer hippies chanting and meditating, it is for serious and older athletes doing active heated stretch routines and intense cardio which is perfect for tennis conditioning and injury prevention. If you have (almost) any of the ache and pain conditions discussed here regularly I highly recommend a visit to your local hot yoga studio and ask about power yoga and yoga for athletes (using small dumbbell weights). Namaste.
     
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  22. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Awesome info. Thanks everyone for your contribution.

    I've been trying to follow as many of your advices as possible. Amazingly, after knowing the term, the stuffs I researched and your info, things seem to be better. I got two new pairs of shoes with laces, put away all my laceless shoes, and been stretching and skipping tennis (the hardest part). The morning pain has reduced substantially.

    Walking barefoot, which someone suggests, on cold tile floor is uncomfortable though. I walk around the house in a soft flip flop. But I think the suggestion to walk on a beach or grass makes a lot of sense.

    Povl Carstensen, how do you make "homemade J-shaped heel insert"?
     
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  23. Povl Carstensen

    Povl Carstensen Legend

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    Flipflops might not be at all good. Specially if they are old and worn out. Plus they do not have laces at all. Why not just use socks?
    I read about the insert in a danish article (I am from Denmark). Basically I use the heel part of an normal insole I had lying around. Then cut out 1/4 of it, the front, outside 1/4, to reduce stress/press here under the foot. Then it looks sort of like an J (depending on whether it is right or left shoe). It seemed to fit in the way that this was where I was most sore. Might not work for everybody.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2012
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  24. heninfan99

    heninfan99 Legend

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    I"ve had this and it's a b!tich but I healed up 100%. When I had it the first steps in the morning were very painful. I believe Ihad caused it by playing in ill fitting worn sneakers for a whole season.
    Here's what I did:
    1. I bought shoes designed for this issue by Brooks just so I could walk without too much pain.
    2. I stopped playing tennis for months --I had little tears in the bottom of my foot and I had to let them heal.
    3. Massaged the bottom of my foot on a tennis ball while sitting down --kinda rolling it around.
    4. When the pain subsided a bit I started to stretch the whole leg. You don't have to become a yoga guru but being flexible is paramount in tennis. I wish I were more so.

    Also, seeing a physical therapist can be good esp. if they use ultrasound.
    Anywho, I wear Nikes now and it hasn't been an issue for years.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2012
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  25. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    I have had pain in my feet from running, tennis, etc. I don't know if it was really PF, but it was and still is uncomfortable to walk around barefoot on cold, hard tile flooring as you suggest. For me, flip flops with cheap soles are just as bad if not worse and socks or slippers aren't any good either.

    I had to find a pair of really good flip flops. Bite Mako's. Crocs bought Bite a few years ago and ran their products into the ground, so these are no longer sold, but I did see some on Fbay. That's where I got mine. These have a really comfy and sturdy footbead and a draw strap so you can tighten them to fit your foot. These are the best I've ever found. I bought several pair when they were still available.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2012
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  26. rufus_smith

    rufus_smith Professional

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    I've had PF of varying severity for 20 years and have tested just about every approach. Some people have it real severe, some have it mild. Some have it mainly in the heel area and some it over the entire sole of the foot. I doubt that it 100% curable for someone that stresses their feet often, like avid tennis players on a hardcourt. The goal is to keep it under control.

    Some brief tips from my experience:

    -ice pack the soles of your feet often especially after tennis or any walking.
    -stretch the achilles tendon often especially after and before sleeping
    -you definitely need a special insole or heel support in the tennis shoe that is more shock absorbent than what the shoe company provides. Inflasoles are the most extreme solution.
    -a tight taping of the sole of the foot can help but it can get too time consuming on a daily basis.
    -night splints help but can be annoying

    good luck
     
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  27. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    Since I believe I was the one advocating walking barefoot, let me explain what I did. I did not walk barefoot much on hard surfaces when I was still getting a lot of heal pain - I mostly wore Crocs. Once I wasn't feeling the heel ache in the mornings, I started going barefoot more and doing the foot exercises, calve raises on stairs, picking things up with rolling towels with toes, etc. Then I progressed to walking barefoot as much as possible.

    Once your feet are healthy and strong, it does not hurt to walk on cold hard tile or concrete floors. That is if you learn how to properly walk barefoot, which means not slamming your heel into the ground (you may need to make stride adjustments) you will not feel pain and your very sensitive feet will desensitize to some extent. For instance, I go barefoot a lot, but not that often on really rough surfaces like crushed rock or very rough asphalt. It is quite comfortable to walk on tile or concrete.

    My feet started getting sore as I walked more barefoot. But it was definitely a muscles soreness and as my feet have strengthened I feel it much less often. Walking barefoot allows you to use feet muscles more, and you'll adopt a softer walking style, which I feel is more akin to the way a cat moves than a clomping motion you can do in shoes.

    I still play tennis in tennis shoes, but I've adopted much softer minimalist shoes for wearing out and about when being barefoot or in flat flip-flops would be inappropriate. It helps to live in a beach town. I can walk thru a grocery store without wearing shoes and not get hassled.
     
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  28. JoelDali

    JoelDali G.O.A.T.

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    I used to date a girl named Plantar.

    She was East Indian.

    GPOAT worthy.
     
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  29. yemenmocha

    yemenmocha Professional

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    Yes I have it off and on.

    Best form of help was high quality custom made orthodics from a podiatrist. I found a sports focused office too. The guy is/was the podiatrist for the Phoenix Suns.

    I did therapy with them as well (massage and some other stuff) plus a regimen of stretches and activities involving a ball.

    Ibuprofen.

    Weight loss.

    Night splint.


    But by far the best thing was the custom orthodics. Night splints were maybe 2nd.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2012
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  30. heninfan99

    heninfan99 Legend

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    Yes "weight loss" that was key for me too.
     
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  31. Povl Carstensen

    Povl Carstensen Legend

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    #31
  32. Frank Silbermann

    Frank Silbermann Professional

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    HTP Heel Seats worked for me.
     
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  33. ericsson

    ericsson Hall of Fame

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    A lot of bad info here IMHO, first of all, it should be called Plantar Fasciosis instead of Fasciitis cos it is rarely inflamed so ice, ibu's etc... is a waste of use.
    What you should do is walk barefoot most of the time, if not possible, wear minimalistic shoes with zero drop, wide toe box, no toe spring. (Altra, Vivobarefoot, Leming etc..)
    Get rid of the orthotics, only weaken your feet more and more.
    Massage lightly with a bal under the foot. Never stretch very tight cos you will only make it worse. Instead do it lightly and stretch your toes cos these can play a big role in PF.
    Last but not least look for any triggerpoints in the calf muscle inside the tibia bone, massage your calves with a roller or foam roller.


    Plantar fasciosis is the degeneration (deterioration) of the plantar fascia as a result of repetitive stress. This is proven by Dr. Lemont (Temple University) in a study bye the Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association.
    Lemont had looked at tissue samples from 50 patients undergoing heel-spur surgery for chronic plantar fascitis. Like many, Lemont had been taught that plantar fascitis was the result of inflammation of the plantar fascia. "In fact," he wrote, "the suffix '-itis' inherently implies an inflammatory disease."

    But that wasn't what he and his colleagues saw under the microscope. Not a single sample showed signs of inflammation. Rather, the tissues appeared to have been damaged from repeated micro-tears and associated cell death. Lemont concluded that this called into question the widespread treatment of plantar fascitis with cortisone shots and anti-inflamatories. If there's no inflammation, such treatments won't work.
     
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  34. TCF

    TCF Hall of Fame

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  35. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    I tend to agree with you, but we're definitely on the fringe on this issue at the moment. I got a cure by strengthening my feet and have not had any further troubles.

    I wear Leming shoes around casually when I can't go barefoot and I use Yonex tennis shoes when I play because they don't pinch my toes. It made a huge difference for me, but one case is just an anecdote, and I doubt there will be any studies on this soon.

    I still read articles claiming that being barefoot or wearing flip-flops causes PF. So the podiatry industry does not accept this sort of "treatment" or exercise. Most people will not ignore the podiatrist's advice.
     
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  36. woodrow1029

    woodrow1029 Hall of Fame

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    #36
  37. Povl Carstensen

    Povl Carstensen Legend

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    To me wearing flip flops and going barefoot have very little to do with each other. On the contrary actually.
     
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  38. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Oh wow...the info coming in is starting to be ....overloading and confusing. Now I can't decide whether to go barefoot or with flip flop or tightly laced shoes or comfortable laceless shoes.

    My injured foot has never been swollen. I could definitely feel that there was tearing in the heel. Since applying some advices from this thread (stretching, strung shoes, skipping tennis) my foot is getting much better. It fits for walking as much as I want, but definitely not ready for tennis running.

    Wearing shoes that hug the sole of your foot kinda makes sense because don't you get more support that way? Instead of just the heel and ball parts of the foot?

    My flip flop feels soft and provides cushioning for the injured part, no?

    I've been doing this exercise where I stand on a stairway step with half of my feet and rise up and down!
     
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  39. purple-n-gold

    purple-n-gold Professional

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    Years ago a colleague gave me a great explaination of PF pain. The tear in the fascia heals, "scabs" over during sleep/rest and when you get up and bear weight, those first ginger like and painful steps are the tears reopening. He had a severe case and had to get a pair of some special shoes as well as some custom orthotics that were built up in the arch. I had a mild case 10 yrs ago that I believe originated from trauma to the heel from running down steps to a code. I spent alot of time on my feet on hard floors and was overweight. I invested in better shoes and insoles, did the calf stretching that you mentioned and it gradually went away but it took some time. The advice of going barefoot might be of some benefit eventually, but I would not expect it to during the initial, acute phase. Flip flops though are probably the worst thing one can wear with any foot issue.
     
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  40. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    In both cases, the podiatrists tend to argue that the foot is not "supported." I will agree with you that some flip-flops are really like shoes and some people change gate when wearing them.

    However, some of the cheap flip flops aren't too much different than going barefoot if you're just walking around - in my experience. These are flips with flat soles and little cushioning. I don't have to do any gripping with my toes to keep them on. It is a little harder to do the normal barefoot stride.
     
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  41. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    My was resolved after seeing a soft tissue specialist and receiving ART - active release therapy. Hurt. A lot.

    It still flares up once and a while...

    I've been trying this...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BM4g6lRSA_E

    I also sometimes tape.
     
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  42. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

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    Hey Topaz... Nice to see your post. I had a bad case a few years ago. Lots of calf stretches and losing some weight really helped. Not to mention.. if you can take some time off. Make sure you have good shoes. There has been a ton posted on what a good shoe would be be.. try to find that info.. it was on the money and helped me. The thing that started the PF for me was a move to some New Balance 655's that I had never used and had the flex point in the very wrongest place for my feet. I went back to my Nikes and that also added my recovery. The best way, BTW to recover is to REST!!! Get of the court and let it heal.
     
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  43. danno123

    danno123 Rookie

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    I had it for a while. I actually partially tore the fascia running down a lob once. It went away once a few months after I started wearing Superfeet Orange inserts. (My arches are really high).

    Good luck.
     
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  44. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    I have not had PF for a few years and it was typically a flare-up once or twice a year. I used a night splint and it was gone overnight.

    I originally had it in the 1990s. Back then I was running and playing tennis. I suspect that the original trigger was playing with worn tennis shoes. I saw a podiatrist who did a wrap with a cookie which helped. Back then, PF was hard to get information about. I found a way to make homemade arch supports and splints and the splints solve my problem overnight and the arch supports have kept my feet health. Of course all of this stuff can be bought from CVS today.
     
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  45. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    Hey Steve!

    Well, part of my issue is that I work on my feet...a lot! Retail part time, and nursing school (with 12 hours clinicals in the hospital).

    Take time off? hahaha...me???

    Well, actually, since I did get a bump to 4.0, I will be playing less at least, because I won't be playing two levels.
     
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  46. Povl Carstensen

    Povl Carstensen Legend

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    I think part of the reason I got it was that I started to work a lot more standing up (nursing school too btw). I still managed to get rid of it though.
     
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  47. ericsson

    ericsson Hall of Fame

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    If people getting PF from being barefoot or wearing flops all summer, that is only cos the foot is not used to that situation, some feet are so used to being cramped in narrow toe boxes, elevated heels and soft soles.
    Then suddenly starting walking barefoot or wearing flops all summer puts a lot of stress on the feet and tendons cos they are so weak. My advice here is give your feet time to adjust and build it up....
    Trust me, people in Africa where most of the time walking barefoot will not suffer from PF, they have very strong feet and very flexible toes.
     
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  48. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    Hmmm, nursing school = plantar fasciitis?

    Part of our issue is that our shoes can not be sneakers and can not have any other color than white. That really limits what I could find for school, and I ended up with shoes that just were soooo uncomfortable! I think I have a better pair now, but cutting back on my retail job also made a difference.

    I also use yoga toes (toe separator thingies) to stretch out my toes and feet...I think that helps my overall foot.
     
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  49. Povl Carstensen

    Povl Carstensen Legend

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    But most flipflops are rather thick, soft soles which in my experience is very far from barefoot, and not good for the foot. Plus they dont tie properly to the foot which can make you tense your toes and feet.

    Yes nursing school/kindergarten. The thing is I went from parttime to fulltime for a period and I think it delayed my recovery a little. I use Vivo Barefoot shoes for everyday use.
    Now what really kicked of my PF I think was playing barefoot on an uneven clay court at our club. A a result of rain followed by sun, this badly kept or established court had turned into a sort of concrete lunar landscape. So yes, there can be limits to the bliss of going/playing barefoot. I am now however enjoying my tennis barefoot indoors on Rebound Ace. I mean, that stuff is like one big upside down sneaker.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
    #49
  50. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    5,371
    Nice bump to 4.0.. Congrats!!!! Yes.. hard to stay off your feet when it part of your job. I guess I meant to say was try to limit your court hours and do all the right things. BTW...walking in bare feet or flip flops are both wrong when you have PF. The shoes need to supply the right flex point.. that is a major issue. I was wearing shoes almost all the time and it really helped to cure the PF. Best wishes and good luck curing the PF. Sorry about this.. but all I can say is that PF "sucks" and was worse than my knee being repaired. If you love to play tennis it is one of the worse issues you can have. If you can't drive to the ball you are done unless you have a very big serve and ground game. If you run to win points... forget it.
     
    #50

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