Player's frame (misleading title)

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by b., Jan 13, 2005.

  1. b.

    b. Rookie

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    Apr 16, 2004
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    347
    While my first hit was made with woodie, it was of unknown origin. I remember some of well known wood racquets, but never knew what is, besides build quality, that makes "player's" wooden racquet (as opposed to tweener or game improvement racquet - hehe).

    Does anybody knows anything about this, and about Slazenger Jupiter (on the bad picture)? I got one in possesion by chance.

    Thanks!

    (Just look at the nice small heads! And the mid is difficult to play with?)

    [​IMG]
     
    #1
  2. Ryoma Kun

    Ryoma Kun Semi-Pro

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    is the racquet in the middle allowed in tournement play, it looks CRAZY
     
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  3. veb

    veb Guest

    Looks like the Wilson T-3000 in the middle to me. Ryoma Kun, you must not been around in the 70's....
     
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  4. veb

    veb Guest

    I am thinking that the wood racquets "build quality" is what it was all about. Differences in types of wood, wood quality, the quality in the laminations made the difference and the difference in flex and feel. Look at the difference in lamination quality let's say of the Dunlop Maxply Fort and the Wilson "cheapo" Chris Evert with factory strings. You would need to see the difference without the painting of course in most racquets. Just my stab at it.
     
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  5. AndrewD

    AndrewD Legend

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    Yep, Veb, that certainly looks like the Wilson T3000. My former doubles partner used to play with one -quite successfully too I should add. Although I will say, when he mishit one (thankfully, not often) and I got stuck up at net it was sitting duck time lol.
     
    #5
  6. Kirko

    Kirko Hall of Fame

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    The Slazenger looks just like a no.1 their most successsful wood frame; believe it or not hitting with a wod frame was pretty easy. The only important thing was having the right grip size the bigger the better to prevent the frame from twisting .
     
    #6
  7. Rookie

    Rookie Rookie

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    Hi Ryoma, the one in the middle is the famous Wilson T-3000, used by Jimmy Corners.

    I still keep one for collection item. But this racket is really driving stringer "CRAZY". I still don't know the proper way of stringing this stick.
     
    #7
  8. b.

    b. Rookie

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    So, it is build quality. Yes, I remember sendwiches of wood, and scheme given on Borg's Donnay (kinds of wood, layers). It was really elaborate. I guess it was a laborious putting that together.

    Middle one is T3000, without plastic plate in throat (it fell of). As it can be seen it was not restrung for years. Interesting stick. Soft. And no metalic feel - what can I say. Most metallic "feels" I got from some graphite sticks. Although graphite haven't decided if it is metal or not :)

    Thanks.
     
    #8

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