Player's Rackets Are For Beginners!

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by pr0n8r, May 13, 2008.

  1. pr0n8r

    pr0n8r Rookie

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    It may seem counterintuitive, but I think we are doing new tennis players a disservice these days by putting oversized, light weight, super-powerful rackets in their hands. Beginners should use low-powered, arm friendly, head light "player's" rackets.

    When new players are practicing forehands and backhands for the very first time, they are developing muscle memory. They are gathering information about how the game works at an extremely rapid pace. During this time, both bad and good habits can be formed, and often stay with the player forever.

    One problem with beginning with a "beginner's frame" is that these frames encourage the wrong habits in new players. With a beginners frame, you are rewarded when you just take a poke at the ball rather than stroke the ball. By not having to take a fluid stroke, the developing player never really learns strokes; they learn bad habits that have to be broken by teaching professionals later on. You cannot learn to properly perform a forehand swing if your racket is so powerful that the ball sails beyond the baseline.

    Another issue is that because of bad technique, beginners are prone to arm injuries. If some advanced players were asked to use one of these "game improvement" frames for a month, a lot of them would worry about the health of their arm, yet these same players continue to recommend such frames for beginners. Why put a frame that is not arm friendly in the hands of a new player who is already prone to arm issues? What happens is that this new player gets tennis elbow, then they associate tennis with pain, then they quit before they have had the chance to enjoy the game.

    Super-powerful frames also send the wrong message to beginning players. Essentially, what we communicate to new players is that "since you're not very skilled yet, this racket will help make up the difference." This mentality is completely wrong. No "game improvement" frame really improves the beginner's tennis game. The best type of frame for a new player is one that teaches feel, smooth strokes, and offers consistent shot production without too much power. I'll take it a step further and say that new players should use low-powered rackets. Only when a player has developed consistent strokes should they even consider switching to a "tweener" type frame. The message we should send to new players about rackets is that "since you're not very skilled yet, this arm-friendly, low-powered racket will help you to hit more consistently. You will be able to have longer rallies, and you will learn good stroke technique which will make the game more fun."

    All of this commonly accepted information regarding what beginners should use and what advanced players should use is really a product of big companies' marketing campaigns. It's not based upon factual evidence that these frames actually help to improve the developing player's game. Large corporations have decided for us that beginners need super-powerful rackets. They push these rackets on new players by lavishing them with the latest "technology", and they charge incredibly high prices. "You're a new player, so how about our One model which retails for $300?" What they are actually doing is retarding the development of decent strokes in the new player, giving them increased chances for injury, and preventing many from ever enjoying the game. The way tennis equipment is marketed needs a good re-think, and we have to debunk all of the falsehoods that have been developed and nurtured by big corporations.

    Sure it may seem counterintuitive, but is it really? A beginner has little control, and needs an arm-friendly racket that encourages the development of good technique. Head Prestiges, Wilson Pro Staffs, Pro Kennex Redondos, and POG's are all excellent beginner frames. A player's racket provides lots of control, a predictable response, and good safety for the arm. Can a new player handle a 12 ounce racket? Of course they can! They always have been able to, and they always will. We've only recently convinced ourselves that they can't. If you put a player's frame in the hands of a beginner, and don't expose them to the commonly accepted notion that it's for advanced players only, that new player will never question whether or not they can handle it. Control oriented frames are for beginners. KSix-One Tour 90's are for beginners. The Head Prestige line is pure beginner stuff. The Jack Kramer Wood is an excellent beginner frame. Anyone else agree?
     
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  2. ThA_Azn_DeViL

    ThA_Azn_DeViL Semi-Pro

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    your thinking seems logical, but some beginners are bound to make more mistakes and get frustrated using players racquets, and you know what happens to beginners that get frustrated... bye bye.
     
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  3. pow

    pow Hall of Fame

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    I agree to a point, I have had a beginner using a big frame pick up my frame Redondo Mid and prefer it over what she was using despite my frame having a small head and good weight.

    I have also seen my friend get arm problems from trying to exert himself on a heavy frame when he first picked up tennis.
     
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  4. Recon

    Recon Semi-Pro

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    Agreed, I thought me and my coach were the only ones who thought this. Since the players racket give you nothing, it is the ultimate training tool. It makes you have perfect clean strokes because of the weight and small headsize. It rewards early preparation and great footwork.
     
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  5. pr0n8r

    pr0n8r Rookie

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    I hear ya, but don't believe it actually works that way. I think that if you take a couple of new players and give them low-powered frames they actually have a better chance of sustaining a rally. Keeping a rally going is about as much fun as can be had when just starting, since it's less time spent fetching the ball.
     
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  6. urbo73

    urbo73 Rookie

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    #6
  7. pr0n8r

    pr0n8r Rookie

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    I learned to play with a heavy wood tennis racket, even though I'm not old enough to have played wood. It felt a lot like the K90 you use. It's just what was lying around at the time I decided to play. I *never* thought it felt too heavy, or that it wasn't powerful enough. It allowed me to swing naturally and freely while keeping the ball in the court. It had a nice soft feel, and I did not struggle with arm pain like I hear so many beginners struggling with now. It didn't kill me on shanks, because it had enough mass to absorb the impact. Many professional players learned tennis as young kids using "players rackets." If some 5 year old was able to swing a wood frame, I don't see why a 35 year old man can't handle that extra 3 ounces and use a K90.
     
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  8. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    I completely agree with the OP that players are better off using more advanced racquets. I don't know how many often middle-aged women I see at clubs wearing some kind of wrap around their arm near the elbow, giving me the indication they are probably suffering from tennis elbow because they have terrible strokes and are using a big granny stick. Sure they would be better off if they had instruction and used a more arm-friendly racquet, but the only issue is that alot of players don't have the time, money, or desire to learn proper mechanics (through lessons) that would be required to have success with these more advanced racquets. Instead people would rather have the instant gratification of picking up a racquet and being able to play right away with or without any actual tennis skills.

    The whole purpose for manufacturers to create this huge range of racquets is to keep players interested in the game and buying racquets. Not only does this marketing of progressive racquets make it easier for beginners to start playing, but it also forces them to upgrade to more advanced racquets with every milestone they hit in their development.

    I think it should be up to the individual to do whats right for them, but if I were a tennis instructor I would certainly encourage my students to play with racquets that promote better technique unless they have some physical limitations where they just can't generate any power on the own. 99% of the time players who use these beginner sticks wouldn't need them if they learned more proper mechanics.
     
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  9. deme08

    deme08 Professional

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    Absolutely agree! Great thread!
     
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  10. charaseac

    charaseac Rookie

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    I'm actually one of those players who improve using player's rackets..

    The thing is, i'm a self taught, i spent lots and lots of time to read and watch videos ask people around and learn how to play tennis correctly. Now, not everyone have the same amount of time to spend or even have the passion to do that.

    Some people just want to play tennis for fun, and they want to learn it fast, and they dont care about proper techniques as long as they can play with their friends and/or families.

    So i think it's relative. For beginner who actually wants to have proper techniques, then player's racket is the way to go. For beginner who just want to have fun, beginner racket is the proper one.

    And trust me, the "just want to have fun" group is a lot bigger than the other one, hence beginner's racket is there for them.
     
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  11. furyballs

    furyballs Rookie

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    I totally agree with the op.
     
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  12. pr0n8r

    pr0n8r Rookie

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    ^^
    I don't agree that it's more fun for beginners to play with a "game improvement" racket, nor have I ever observed that these rackets actually improve anyone's game. For beginners, if you want to take your best shot at reeling them into the game, give them a real racket, imo. Give them the one that helps them keep the ball in the court, that doesn't hurt their arm. Give them the one that's a good match for the weight of tennis balls, not one that gets pushed around every time they hit off-center shots.

    Have you ever met a beginner that couldn't manage to hit the ball over the 12 foot back fence, from the opposite baseline? Beginners aren't typically short on power, it's control they need. The entire notion that rackets are progressive, in that you start with a Big Bubba, and progress to a Prestige is completely backwards. Beginners should start with low-powered equipment, and when they learn the game, then consider the possibility of tweaking their equipment for a *little* more power, once they know how to harness it.
     
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  13. CGMemphis

    CGMemphis Rookie

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    What ever happened to demoing racquets with a good tennis pro or coach and finding what works for you? Swing mechanics are swing mechanics, bad foot work is bad footwork.
     
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  14. ramos

    ramos New User

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    I agree !!

    Finaly someone that thinks like me ...:)
     
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  15. pr0n8r

    pr0n8r Rookie

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    Nothing at all, amirite? Pro's make a couple recommendations, and they vary on what those recommendations are. Some pro's think like I do, and some are caught up in the beginner frame hype. A good question to me is, "What ever happened to thinking for ourselves, as opposed to allowing big companies and tennis retailers to think for us?"
     
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  16. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    When I was maybe thirteen and playing with the Dunlop Maxply Fort (I switched away from wood a few years later than some), I needed a 2nd racquet and instead of getting the typical "light" that you'd see everywhere, I ordered a "medium" which was even heftier and I adored it! No argument here against kids/beginners learning with more of a player's frame, but I don't expect the cravings for short term success (or lighter racquets) to disappear anytime soon. I also DON'T think that everyone needs to learn just like I did, but I agree that it's not reasonable to declare and entire group of heavier, smaller headed, softer, etc. racquets as inappropriate for certain players because of their level.

    In more recent years, I switched away from my very stiff frames and started working out with soft, heavy, low powered racquets with a longer term goal in mind - I needed to get away from serve and volleying and become a more competent all courter. In empirical terms, I needed to work on me, not my choice of racquet, but the lower powered sticks turned out to be a much better fit and I've made substantial progress with my stroke mechanics and footwork.

    Teaching and coaching high school teams has been interesting and thought provoking along the lines of this topic, too. Unlearning bad muscle memory is a big deal when I want to improve an aspect of a player's game and some of these fly swatters that are around really let the kids get away with some horrible mechanics. That crap has to be unlearned, maybe even exorcized before building in the right direction. That takes a while. Often times the lighter frames let the newer players get away without much using their legs. While that may be helpful for some folks with marginal physicality who want to get out there and play (I'm all for that), I think it can help to make a bit of a mess for others.

    Blah, blah, blah... sorry, my coffee hasn't kicked in yet. I can say with some clarity though, that I've never really understood the idea of getting a player into a full sized racquet that's intended for them to use until they get better and can move on to a player's frame. That just sets them up for the frustrating phase of unlearning the old muscle memory, right?
     
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  17. pr0n8r

    pr0n8r Rookie

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    I'm so happy to see some people agree with me. Lately in my home town, it seems that every time I recommend a player's frame to someone struggling with arm pain and/or game improvement issues, they look at me as if I've asked them to mow the lawn with a pair of scissors. It's 3 ounces and a different balance, people! =P sheesh
     
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  18. Nellie

    Nellie Hall of Fame

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    I am in the middle on this - I agree that a wide-frame racquet does not do any favors to beginning players, but most people I know really benefit from an lighter, oversized racquet due to the more foregiving, larger sweet spot. Likewise, the lighter racquet (10-11 ounces) tends to be better for novice players because they don't have the shoulder strength for a 12 ounce frame. Something like a Pure drive Oversize or a Radical OS.

    Starting with too heavy of a frame will encourage bad technique as well becauce player will tend to be late or overswing.
     
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  19. LanEvo

    LanEvo Hall of Fame

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    i gotta say i kinda agree with this because when i first began with tennis, i used a huge OS, but then i switched to an mfil 300 and improved drastically
     
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  20. The Pure One

    The Pure One Rookie

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    I agree 100% with the op.
     
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  21. jmverdugo

    jmverdugo Hall of Fame

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    I do not agree with the OP, not because i think a begginer couldnt use a players racket but because i think rackets do not teach technique, professional instructors do. A person without proper teaching will have bad technique regardless the reacket.

    The main problem, IMO, of players rackets and begginers is for how long they can hadle the racket. Tennis it is not a 30 min game and you do not get good by only practicing, you have to play matches, long matches and in the end the weight and the lack of power of the racket will defeat you.

    Once you start to evolve, your own game will ask for a more demanding racket, that is the way it shoudl be, again IMO.

    Also, i think it makes no sense to say that in the old days young kids learned with heavy wood rackets and so young kids today should be ablt to do it to, basically because the strokes are not the same.

    And finally I have never ever seing a young kid or a begginer having problems with the technique with a tweener racket, but I do have seing begginers having problem with their technique and using a "players frame". JMO. Obviusly in the case that both palyers have the proper guidance.
     
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  22. NoBadMojo

    NoBadMojo G.O.A.T.

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    I dont agree. I say this after giving a few thousand hours of lessons and observing how people get better and what impedes their progress

    There are a big number of racquet options which fall in between too demanding and too light/powerful, and that's where many/most tennis players belong if they wish to not be stuffed by their gear.

    Picking something too demanding delays development and encourages bad technique and can lead to injury...not the opposite of this

    Picking the right racquet for your CURRENT skillset is the right thing to do...a concept which many dont seem to understand
     
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  23. pr0n8r

    pr0n8r Rookie

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    OMG the G.O.A.T! =P

    All due respect of course; that's a lot of posts. But, I think the right racket for the beginner's skillset is the one that offsets what they struggle with the most while contributing to their development. Beginners struggle with keeping the ball in the court, and are prone to feeling discomfort due to mishits and bad technique. The extra mass and the balance of a player's racket is perfect for them, since it's more arm-friendly, and helps with control.

    New players will very quickly adapt to whatever you put in their hands. There's something special about a racket that's about 12 ounces in regards to how it handles the impact of the tennis ball, and a head-light balance is easier on the body. I don't buy in to the notion that a player's racket will impede a beginner's progress, rather, it will help. So, I respectfully disagree.
     
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  24. bluetrain4

    bluetrain4 Legend

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    I basically agree with the OP, but would make a few points.

    For "beginners" who are actually learning the game for the purpose of developing into better players (i.e., they will eventually not be "beginners"), I agree that a more traditional racquet can (but not always) help develop better strokes and give honest feedback as to what they have to do to improve.

    But, there is a huge segment of recreational and club players who are basically "beginners" forever. People who play once or twice a month. Club players who play "everyone at the baseline" doubles with the same people every week and enjoy themselves, but see it as more of a social event than serious competition. For these "perpetual beginners", I think beginner frames or tweeners are the way to go. They can get more enjoyment out of the game because they can do more (hit harder, hit deeper) than with tradtional frames. Of course, I'd encourage them to get better, but the reality is that many of them won't.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2008
    #24
  25. PandaKuo777

    PandaKuo777 New User

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    when i have kids one day, I will start them off with tennis with heavier rackets. Not rackets that will break their arms like the k90 that i'm using, but maybe the kteam-k95.
     
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  26. Kirko

    Kirko Hall of Fame

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    Agree. I started with the kramer auto. in 1965 and continued with it until 1982. I still can remember when I started to hit forehands & backhands the length of the court with ease. I was thrilled and knew I was on my way as a tennis player.
     
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  27. TenniseaWilliams

    TenniseaWilliams Professional

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    The benefit of stiffer, larger headsizes is mostly for hits off center, ie. softer stringplane, higher twistweight to static weight ratios, psychologically larger margin for error, etc. Lighter racquets help timing control and even swing speed for beginners, and let the fine control muscles develop. Low power requires technique, the beginners tend to throw themselves around too much instead of using the kinetic chain and hitting cleanly. The arm friendly super head-light heft is great, but is mostly needed by hard-hitting frequent players, not beginners.

    I agree that extreme beginner frames can slow down development once the player begins to develop a longer swing, footwork, and timing. Almost any of the middle of the road frames (11oz or so, mid-plus or mildly oversize heads, reasonably balanced) can be used for long periods of time without limiting development, and can be easily customized (with stiffer string, or weighting) if necessary for advanced use. This includes most tweener and MP player frames.

    Some of the fastest beginner development uses short/very light frames, and low compression and/or foam balls. Mostly used for kids, I think adult beginners would benefit from this as well, if they can get over wanting to look advanced as quickly as possible. Looking advanced is really why beginners want player frames...
     
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  28. urbo73

    urbo73 Rookie

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    OK, now I'm just confused. If you read this thread:

    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showt...160692&page=12

    #236 onwards, you'll see a good explanation. But which way to go?

    Whom to believe? Why such radical differences among coaches? Do you coach? What is your background? Just curious, because it seems to radically different as I said. And it should NOT be. Maybe a pro can prefer this or that, but for someone like myself 2.5/3 player, looking to keep the same racquet, learn, and improve, there are simply too many choices and opinions. So who do you trust? As I said in my posts in that thread, most racquets feel comfortable for me at my level. But what happens 5 months down the road, as balls come faster, etc.? Which is the problem? The weight or the small head? Just baffled..
     
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  29. urbo73

    urbo73 Rookie

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    #29
  30. pr0n8r

    pr0n8r Rookie

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    ^
    I don't coach; I'm a 4.0 recreational player. Let's get that out of the way. I do still feel that I have been around this game long enough to objectively understand the equipment dilemma beginning players face; hell, I know equipment much better than most teaching pro's. On a side note, has it ever shocked anyone else how LITTLE pro's know about equipment sometimes?

    I am calling it as I see it. Sometimes professionals buy in too much to the current trends with gear. The equipment manufacturers sell to them, and push propaganda on them, and they feed on it.

    I have had lessons from several pro's and I have heard both sides of this argument. In the end, in my final analysis, I think the player's frame is the way to go from the outset.

    I have started my wife playing, and she had a tough time controlling her shots with a wide body, 9 ounce Head she had acquired at some point. As soon as I gave her one of my PS Tour 90's, she immediately appreciated the feel of the racket, and she had no problem handling the extra 3 ounces.

    In the end, it's your call, but as you can see I'm not the only one who has made this observation regarding the hype, smoke and mirrors that permeate the tennis racket industry.
     
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  31. urbo73

    urbo73 Rookie

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    I don't agree or disagree. I can see both sides. I'm just not sure which path to take. It's not about taste - I wish it were that easy.

    Pros know about equipment - but they are not gearheads. They play. This is true in every domain - art, sports, etc. Pros not talking may simpy mean that it's in fact not so important?
     
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  32. benasp

    benasp Semi-Pro

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    I think heavier is better for begginer cause the mass help produce power without needing to swing hard, and for beginner swigning hard mean hitting all over the place. Also if your timing is not top notch and you use a light frame the ball speed will own your racquet beside, when you use a heavier frame, the racquet will handle the ball for itself.

    Then for the headsize, it's probably peference but my experience told me that the bigger sweet spot on oversized racquet just make the racquet twist on offcenter hit. Twisting also has a lot to do with the weight of the racquet

    so for me the equation is over sized + light frame + beginner = frustration

    in the last few years, i switched from head IX3 to pure drive to aero storm and i've always seen improovement mostly due to higher weight. And i don't buy the ''not enought power argument'' cause anyone can hit long even with a friing pan and beginner don't with game with power but with consistency power become a factor only at higher level.
     
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  33. Bubba

    Bubba Professional

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    I agree with most. However, you need to realize that kids start with the larger, more forgiving frame as early as 3 years old... and today's instructors teach them primarily brush top-spin and 2hbh.

    As they progress, they migrate to frames that support that learning and therefore the huge mid+following.

    Show me 1 teaching pro that advises kids to use a small headed frame... in fact, no manufacturer even makes one!!!

    Come on instructors... teach mid-style technique!!!
     
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  34. Satch

    Satch Hall of Fame

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    i agree... i started with 13oz Fischer stick and now i can't play with anything below 12.
    I just don't have a stroke to do that.

    and i like this sentence i am saying it all the time
    "All of this commonly accepted information regarding what beginners should use and what advanced players should use is really a product of big companies' marketing campaigns."
     
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  35. Cup8489

    Cup8489 Legend

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    i guess i can see where you're coming from, but i've seen people, including those on my own team, become discouraged by player's frames.

    i was just playing another guy yesterday in fact. he normally plays with this goofy prince recreational gimmick of the o-ports, it was white and black. he had broken the strings, and so i lended him my o3 tour ms, which needs to be restrung since it's lost a lot of tension (left in the car for a few hours).

    he was so shocked at how much pace i could apply compared to him when he used the same frame, that he stopped playing and said i shouldve been number 1. i laughed and said that the two guys above me also used similar frames, but could hit even better.

    he said he wasnt gonna ever improve, and he didnt enjoy playing anymore. i talked to my cousin (assistant coach) and asked him to practice with the kid for a while to get his spirits back up.
     
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  36. Steve1954

    Steve1954 New User

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    I agree. Who is this beginner we are talking about? My sister-in-law is 50 years old and 5 foot 3. My nephew is 21, over six feet and over 200 pounds. If they were just starting out in tennis, I wouldn't give my sister-in-law a players' racket because she wouldn't be able to hit the ball over the net, and I wouldn't give my nephew a light powerful racket because his shots would hit the back fence. My sister-in-law needs a racket powerful enough to get the ball over the service line with her normal swing, and my nephew needs a racket low powered enough where he can swing out and keep the ball inside the baseline. A racket that is too heavy and low powered forces the player to overswing and overstress the arm, while a racket that is too light forces the player to shorten up and learn improper technique, which can also hurt the arm. "Picking the right racquet for your CURRENT skillset is the right thing to do."

    Steve
     
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  37. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    OP overlooks the fact that most beginners are juniors. Some even start with junior-size racquets. As they grow older, they need to start playing matches if they are serious about tennis and want to make it to school teams and local tournaments. The game today is played with huge topspin and high bouncing balls. Watch any junior tournament, and you will see balls landing deep and bouncing over the head of the player. To win these matches, the junior has to return the ball with racquet above the height of his shoulder, and still keep the ball down. From personal experience hitting with juniors, I know how hard it is to swing above your shoulder and still put speed and spin on the ball. A player's racquet would be beyond their ability to play this way.
     
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  38. Cup8489

    Cup8489 Legend

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    perhaps he simply neglected to mention that his post mightve been aimed towards adult beginners?
     
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  39. fps

    fps Legend

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    i don't know... you have to have the physique for it.
    my g/f started playing with me recently borrowing one of my modest 11.5oz racquets- waaaaay too heavy for her, she v petite and the thing was all ends up too big! she's got her own racquet now (same grip size as mine), weights about 10oz. I'm coaching her to swing properly and she's coming along great!
     
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  40. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    Beginners have no business playing with a "players racquet". :)
     
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  41. Babb

    Babb Professional

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    Now down to 4 feet behind the baseline.
    ^^^
    Then why are you using that MG Prestige, Drak? Huh? Huh? ;)
     
    #41
  42. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
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    I like to go against the grain, and be a non-conformist. :)
     
    #42
  43. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    I agree partially with the OP. Although I would not go as far as putting a 12 oz. plus midsize frame with a swingweight of 330+ in the hands of a beginner. I think they are best served by a 11 oz MP with a moderate swingweight. A serious tweener so to speak.
    Some of the so-called game improvement frames are actually dead and don't have any power at all because of their ridiculously low weight.
     
    #43
  44. symon_say

    symon_say Rookie

    Joined:
    May 6, 2005
    Messages:
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    Location:
    Dominican Republic
    I agree with you, i don't think a players raquet can make any good to a noob, cause it's a lot harder to learn, you learn the right way, yeah, but most of the people how wants to play tennis is for fun, they are not so concern about great strokes, they want to get the ball over the net and have fun with some friends.

    I'm still a noob i'm just 3.0 player, i star with and Wilson H2 OS, and this raquet was great as i start, but as soon as my coach speed up a little i start getting pain in my arm, so i get another raquet a Ncode 6.2 and as soon as i play the first time my game improves a lot i try my coach raquet K90 and it's a lot of hard to play with it.

    So to all the noobs how wants to have fun, and maybe like play some local friendly tournament, just get a MP and enjoy your game.
     
    #44
  45. ThA_Azn_DeViL

    ThA_Azn_DeViL Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Messages:
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    ok, i think a beginner can try a tweener racquet, it basically has qualities of both player racquets and improvement racquets, but you also need a dedicated beginner to get anywhere.
     
    #45
  46. SOY78

    SOY78 Semi-Pro

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    I think all beginners should start with a woodie ;) Then work your way up to the current racquet technologies :D
     
    #46
  47. Alafter

    Alafter Hall of Fame

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    Oct 4, 2005
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    Reality speaks for itself, regardless of what we think. I enjoy my POG OS and HEad AA OS.
     
    #47
  48. klementine

    klementine Hall of Fame

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    The logic seems sound, but too much emphasis is being put on racquets and equiptment. The one big difference between today and yesterday??? KIDS ONLY PLAY AND PRACTICE ONE SPORT.

    Im not young or old (tewnty eight), I remember starting to play when I was 10 with my dad's racquet (adidas GTX Pro, 14+0z.), but the racquet is NOT what helped me develop sound technique. SOCCER- developed good footwork and stamina. FOOTBALL- Gave me a nice hip rotation and instilled a low center of gravity. BASEBALL- How to syncronize my movements, hand eye co-ordination and keep my shoulders loose. SWIMMING- Overall endurance.

    A couple of days ago I tried to help a younger kid, 13, (at the local courts), on how to get good follow through and racquet head speed with his serve, how to flick and pronate his wrist, I said, ' Like a good curve or knucle ball, keep your shoulder loose and dont lock your wrist'. He looked at me as if I was speaking swahili. Wouldn't you know it, he only plays, practices and is taught TENNIS. With every sport I learned and played I brought some lessons from the previous ones, so, no, in my opinion equipment is the last thing they should be concerned about, athletic diversity and experience should be a number #1 priority.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2008
    #48
  49. mishin900

    mishin900 Rookie

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    What you're saying seems right to me, but the thing is those beginners who uses player's frames should be trying to improve their skills.
     
    #49
  50. ohhgourami

    ohhgourami Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
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    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    agree 100% too. and most of the players frames arent even that heavy anyway. once i picked up a k95, my strokes were nice and i could hit the way i always dreamed of.
     
    #50

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