"Players rackets" - are too many people just scared to try them?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by MikeHitsHard93, Apr 7, 2013.

  1. JackB1

    JackB1 G.O.A.T.

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    I'd like to add something else to this discussion...

    Players racquets aren't as hard to use as people think and...

    Easier tweener type racquets won't be as easy as you think.


    Also.... there are no magic rules of thumb here and no black and white solution. Everyone needs to try out different types of racquets to see what they enjoy playing with and what yields the best results.

    Most heavier racquets have smaller sweetspots and that also makes them harder to use. They are also generally less powerful. Those 2 things plus the extra weight can lead to more balls not going back over the net.

    I have used many different types of racquets over the past 3 years and have played pretty much the same with most of them. I only saw minor differences in the actual on court results. However there were major differences in how they felt TO ME and how much I enjoyed using them.
     
    #51
  2. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    I''m sure as well that player's racquets are getting easier to play.

    Whatever else technology does, it's pretty easy to enlarge the sweetspot or increase the power with some sort of added material.

    Woofer and oport player frames take that even further.
     
    #52
  3. MikeHitsHard93

    MikeHitsHard93 Hall of Fame

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    This is how I feel too.
     
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  4. spinovic

    spinovic Hall of Fame

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    I have found this to be the biggest difference and factor. Every racquet I've tested has been a good racquet, to be honest. Perhaps the better you become as a player, the more you can tell differences, but for me, it is primarily about feel. From a mental perspective, it has to feel good or I won't enjoy it much.

    For example, I prefer racquets a little stiffer because it makes me feel like I'm making more solid contact with the ball. Some prefer softer racquets because they get more touch and feel. (I did enjoy the Radical Pro though, which is softer than my normal racquet.) I also like HL balance and 11-12 oz weight range.

    When demoing racquets, the feel, as in weight, balance, etc., is about the only thing you can be sure because the strings and tension can affect various racquets to varying degrees. So, first and foremost, find one that is comfortable to you with regards to weight, balance and stiffness.
     
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  5. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    could you please elaborate on this?

    i would have thought that, if anything, a heavier player's stick would force one to take a full swing at the ball, rather than block or take short swings. also, when serving a players' stick would punish bad form due to it's weight, you'd really need to have a proper swing path and get the racquet moving otherwise the serves won't reach the net or go beyond the baseline at the 2nd bounce... is this not correct?

    it seems to me that with a light stick, one can just flick the ball over or have bad form on serve and not notice because the racquet is so light.

    i use two sticks. my main one is around 11.5 oz (325 grams, 320ish swing weight estimated) and the other is in the 360-370 gram range 12.7-13 oz depending on how much lead in the head (340-350ish swing weight estimated), both headlight 4.5 and 6.5* head light respectively... i hit almost the same with both sticks, early shoulder turn, full swing starting from slightly below the ball and hit through with a slightly closed face. i do feel that when my form gets lazy, a hitting session with the heavier racquet helps get me back into the groove. I should probably settle closer to 360 grams though. 13 oz is a bit much.



    * It's even more headlight at the lower swing weight, with reduced lead in the head (closer to 8 points i think). I will probably settle for the more headlight version.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
    #55
  6. HRB

    HRB Professional

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    I'm "stumped" as well by these statements? mainly the one where he says if a 3.5 is using 13oz racquet, with a short swing, he is in his comfort zone...My observation is at 13oz if you short swing you're lucky that ball is clearing the net!

    My point was, and still is, in my case..when I turned light racquet users onto 11.5 oz and up they simply HAD TO TAKE A FULL SWING and lo and behold they were floored at the depth and pace they developed. Then they got better...and then 3.5's became 4.0's and beyond.

    I certainly don't think heaviest is best...but I've observed the heaviest within reason one can handle usually produces the nicest play. It is truly a fine line...11.5 to me feels like a toy, but that may be heavy as all hell to someone else...on the other hand 13oz to me is a brick and unpleasant..my "wheelhouse" is 11.7-12.5 strung...then gain at 6'1" and over 215 that may equate to 10.7-11.5 to smaller players.

    By the way..please stop comparing mere mortals to the practices of Rafa, he is AN ENIGMA...90% of Pro's go heavy...he goes light...he also has techniques and follow through motions that will bring him many slams...BUT rip the shoulders and knees out of 90% of the rest of the populace.

    I love Rafa for that..his uniqueness...trust me....but we'll see a style like his once every 30 years.
     
    #56
  7. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    Good point PP I have used a lot of rackets just hitting around and thought they were great, but when it comes to going to battle it can be entirely different.
     
    #57
  8. Timbo's hopeless slice

    Timbo's hopeless slice Hall of Fame

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    Hmm, ok.

    Well, what I mean is a heavier racquet works very well for a classic, old school flat or lightly top spun eastern grip FH of the type most often found at 3.5 - 4.0 levels of tennis. It's also the weapon of choice for the classic 'block return'
    And there is nothing wrong with that.

    However, such players often lack the strength or technique to generate a lot of RHS through the swing path of a modern TS FH while using a heavy frame.

    When trying this with a light frame, they tend to concentrate on the 'brush up' but without any RHS all you get is a looping puffball.

    With a heavy frame, they can't do it at all so fall into the pattern of the flat line drive. (the use of the phrase 'full swing' is interesting here, I suspect you refer to a swing that starts at the back fence and extends outward to the target.)

    In regard to serve, despite what TT posters would have one believe, most lower level rec players don't generate much pace or spin on any of their serves and simply getting the mass through the ball is their best chance of a solid serve.

    however, I am sure many will disagree, and that's fine.

    As for Rafa, maybe he is an extreme example, but go to a local futures touranment and see what the young guys are actually using... It sure isn't traditional 'player's frames'!!!
     
    #58
  9. gregor.b

    gregor.b Professional

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    Whilst I would agree with this for the most part, I found the Pure Drive to be an exception due to the extra 15 kph it gave on serve. And then the year it took me and my arm out of the game. Best and worst of both worlds.
     
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  10. Timbo's hopeless slice

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    LOL!!!

    how is the two hander coming along, mate?
     
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  11. gregor.b

    gregor.b Professional

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    Hey mate, how are you and the volks getting along? Yeah, it is getting a run in most of my hitting sessions now, but I am still not quite ready for fixtures or tourneys with it.

    I am binning fixtures at the end of this season (4 weeks) so I can take a whole season to get it sorted.
     
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  12. Timbo's hopeless slice

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    Nice!

    The Volkls and I have settled in for the long haul, I think.

    I just can't find any downside, and it has been a couple of months of pretty intensive playing now.
     
    #62
  13. gregor.b

    gregor.b Professional

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    I am about to start a love affair with a couple of Liquidmetal Instinct Tour XL'S.
    Hopefully, them and my new backhand will get along real good. Never got along with the Volks even though I tried a few. Just one of those things I suppose.
     
    #63
  14. Timbo's hopeless slice

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    There is a bloke I play pennant against who uses FXP Instinct XLs, hits a beautiful ball.

    Also comes from the only club in our area (in the whole country??) with real, honest to red dirt clay.
     
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  15. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    They'd be spanking Djokovic to win the Australian Open! LOL :lol:
     
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  16. gregor.b

    gregor.b Professional

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    It looks like the Liquidmetal is a touch softer which is the only reason I went that way. I currently use the FXP Instinct std length but want a touch more flex and pop. Our Ipswich (George Alder) courts are real? clay (I think). Unbelievable bounce and spin but such hard work.
     
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  17. Timbo's hopeless slice

    Timbo's hopeless slice Hall of Fame

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    yes, always throws me when we play there and the home team suddenly says "ok, you guys sit down, we need to water the courts a bit"

    out come the hoses etc.. we offered to help once but they were horrified, apparently one can get it wrong anf make a real mess..
     
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  18. mikeespinmusic

    mikeespinmusic Rookie

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    Fair call.

    I guessing the modern idea of an advanced player is to take a big, long swing at the ball with plenty of spin to drop it in the court. And the beginner player is known to just push the ball back (so it makes sense to give them a heavier frame) I personally would love to see 3.5's using heavier frames. For the reasons you pointed out. Yes their strokes are compact, but they're going to make a lot less errors. And not everyone is capable of doing all the work for their shots. I don't think there's anything wrong with wanting a racquet to have more stability or plough through the ball. If they can wield it and it enhances them, why not?


    The top players that are supposedly playing with the lighter frames would definitely need them to be stiffer with thicker beams to make up for less weight though right?
    Especially if the weight distribution is polarized like an APD or Prince TT Warrior.
    On a side note: Sampras' racquet weighed nearly 14 ounces. There is a limit to how much weight you can put on a racquet before it slows you down though. Which is why modern players these days are going for Polarized setups because they can whip the racquet through faster compared to Depolarized setups.

    Here's a link better explaining racquet modding if anyone's interested.
    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=309803


    Me personally, I went from the light "Spinnier" frames to the heavier old school players racquets with extra lead on them. I just prefer the frames to not have the risk of collaspe on me when I'm trying to volley a hard hit passing shot. I also, like the idea of hitting through and flattening out against the loopy stuff when I can to charge the net. And as bonus, my opponents are not moving me around the court like they used to, and I think I put that down to having more penetration behind my shots. I'd like to think that I'm still advanced by your standards :p.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
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  19. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    I think heavier players frames are for people that already have the fundamentals down. they don't need much help from the racquet, their proper technique, ground force, deep knee bends, kinetic chain, all that. If you've got it, then you can be a terror on the court with a prestige or a pro staff.

    But... if you don't have those skills, then the heavy players frame isn't going to help you. It could hinder you, but not necessarily so. All I can say is it won't help you in any way. And, if you're a beginner and you need a bit of help from the frame, then you either learn the basics fast, your be prepared for a long string of losses.
     
    #69
  20. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    Keep in mind, you can find heavier tweeners. I think most players benefit from using the heaviest frame they feel comfortable with.

    I do agree that starting with too much stick can be a hindrance though. It's sort of a fine balance for the beginner. Beginning players need a stick with some heft, but with enough forgiveness to not be overly frustrating.
     
    #70
  21. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    Looking at the modern game, I wonder the extent to which a strategy against the high, loopy, spinny shots are simply good hard flat--fast-- drives into the corner.

    And perhaps luring the guy to the net? The extreme grips and 2-handed bh wouldn't bode well there.
     
    #71
  22. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    But, Nadal's frame has a swingweight around 355ish which is higher than all current retail players rackets, tweener rackets and game improvement rackets.

    The stock blade has a swingweight around 330-335ish which is at the high end of the spectrum for retail rackets.

    I'll concede the BIO 600 is a pure tweener.

    I don't think I need to play with pro level player's frames (sw 350+) but I really like thin beam rackets, HL, and SW in the 330-340 range.
     
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  23. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for elaborating. i'm starting to see what you mean.

    full swing as in i end at my left shoulder, like federer...

    Exhibit A
    [​IMG]

    Exhibit B
    [​IMG]

    start with a shoulder turn, no need to point the racquet back, sharapova style...

    I find that when a racquet is a bit heavy 11.5+ oz (325+) it's easier to start to feel the slingshot sensation in the arm (forearm)... at the beginning of the swing forward in the forehand and after the racquet drop on the serve... on the single handed backhand it's similar, but not in the arm. I don't know how to describe it. It's like the racquet lags and then accelerates due to the body's elasticity. Makes everything both smooth and fast.

    i've always thought that spin comes from closing the racquet face and hitting through the ball with speed... the low to high is to control the height and to compensate for the closed face a little. i tend not to over-think this.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2013
    #73
  24. Timbo's hopeless slice

    Timbo's hopeless slice Hall of Fame

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    well, the conversaton in this thread was all about static weight...

    if you are swinging a HL frame with a SW of 330 - 340, well, i doubt it weighs anything under 12 oz

    I think the whole players racquet thing is mostly about ego, the very best young players are using un weighted Pure Drives and Speed Pros, and not too many people on here would get so much as a game off them despite their leaded up prostaffs..

    but whatever, they are all tupperware snowshoes compared to what Borg won 5 wimbledons with, so don't kid yourselves..
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2013
    #74
  25. klementine

    klementine Hall of Fame

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    Can you hit every shot in the book with your racquet?

    The USPTA/USPTR have a skills section when it comes to certifying coaches. If you don't execute 18 of 21 shots, you fail.

    It's easier to execute those 21 different types of shots with a lighter racquet. But if your game consists of executing only 10-12 shots regularly and you're more comfortable with a heavier frame. Go for it.
     
    #75
  26. Timbo's hopeless slice

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    Yes I can, that's how one passes the certification procedure here, too.

    However, I'm not convinced that has any relevance at all to the type of racquet to be honest...
     
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  27. NetNinja68

    NetNinja68 Rookie

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    I think we are witnessing a perceptional shift on what a "players frame" is. Look at the new G Speed with it's lower weight (I don't like) and it's frame creep to 22.5mm as well as frames like the IG Rad and Steam lines which range from 22 - 24mm and offer a bit more free power while still maintaining decent control. It just seems that the ultra thin beamed sticks of yesteryear have no appeal from the young aspiring juniors these days...
     
    #77
  28. klementine

    klementine Hall of Fame

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    Not directed towards you in specific Timbo, more of a rhetorical question, but hey! :smile:

    I just think player spec'd frames are great for a certain type of game, ie- if they work for the user in terms of the return game,service,defensive, offensive shots,etc.

    Nowadays, pros are playing from everything in between 311 strung to 365 strung, so this thread/question is kind of obsolete.
     
    #78
  29. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Remeber, BITD a players racquet was all we had to use
     
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  30. Timbo's hopeless slice

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    ye, that's true, go to any futures tournament and look at all the pure drives and speed pros..

    a modern thick beam mid plus pretty much DEFINES a 'real' player's frame...
     
    #80
  31. kingcheetah

    kingcheetah Professional

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    I think for a lot of people it's a comfort thing... I just switched to the Pro Staff 90 after several demo sessions... and while it took a few minutes to get used to, I think I've been converted(for now) to team mid. I used to rock the Juice pro, which is a fine racquet but was too powerful for me (also lacked feel, but that's a whole different story...)

    Most players I see in college tennis (and saw in HS) used lighter racquets with larger headsizes (Babolat aero pro and pure drive) because it was what they were used to. Some might not have had the physical tools to play with more of a "player's" frame and not see a drop off in performance. Others just seem to never consider it. I tried one on a whim and really liked it, and now here I am playing with one of the most "player's" frames on the market. So I think some people don't really think about trying one, and others are scared simply because of what they are used to.
     
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  32. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Still believe most only try them when they have to. After TE
     
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  33. gregor.b

    gregor.b Professional

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    Player's racquet is what GAVE me TE ( k95 6.1).
     
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  34. Sreeram

    Sreeram Professional

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    I feel as if I started playing with players stick too early in my tennis learning process. I can handle weight with ease so it was not a problem. But the pressure of preparing early as you cannot have many last minute adjustment will hamper the game at 3-3.5 level (due to footwork mistakes). To some extent it forced me to prepare early for my shots. My game improved a lot with I went slightly lower than 12 oz stick to 11.5 oz stick.

    In short a racquet with 12+oz weight with 6+ points HL is best for players with long strokes. It will improve a players game in long run.
     
    #84
  35. snr

    snr Rookie

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    I guess it depends where one is playing at. IMO I actually find sometime too many players okay with a players racket when they really have no business with one. And no I really am not trying to sound elitist or anything and I'm not talking about the dedicated club player looking to improve their game, but more about the guys I see at a public park/court that only got the stick because it was the most expensive and are holding the racquet halfway up the grip.

    The club hacker does come second though.. Very short swings, ready position for the racquet is the racquet head on level with the players knee. You get the picture.

    With that said though, I definitely think that a players racquet can help ones game if they do it right (develop strokes, use the racquet to improve movement etc)
     
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  36. Timbo's hopeless slice

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    maybe we need to re-define what a player's racquet even is?

    if most of the ATP tour and certainly the great majority of futures and challenger level players are using thick beam MPs (and they surely are) whilst an older generation of keen club level players prefer prestiges, pro staffs, POGs and the like, then maybe we need a new term for these frames?

    I suggest 'Grandpa Sticks' :)
     
    #86
  37. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    That's because the K95 6.1 is too stiff and big and too powerful. I consider player's racquets to be very low powered, flexible, and thin beamed so that the player has to generate all the power on their own. The K95 is anything but low powered.
     
    #87
  38. RiggensAuroraHO

    RiggensAuroraHO Rookie

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    I agree with you. "Player's frames" were traditionally based on the most used size and weight for professional players. Perhaps we should say "Traditional" and "Modern" Player's Racquets to be most accurate.
     
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  39. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    forget guys playing futures, what weight and style do the top 10 use? I'm sure someone here can give us a list...

    aren't they mostly pretty heavy?
    also, are pro sticks as stiff as the ones we have to make do with? does anyone know?
     
    #89
  40. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    IMO, players sticks are:

    • Low powered
    • Static weight of 12 oz or greater
    • head size of 95 si or less

    They tend to be what you named above... Pro Staff, Prestige, some Radicals, POGs, etc.
     
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  41. Muppet

    Muppet Hall of Fame

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    The pros don't use racquets that fit into any catagory that's available to us, as they modify their racquets so heavily, and usually start with a pro stock and pj. I'm satisfied with the current designations for retail frames. Why confuse everyone, unless your a racquet manfacturer who wants to re-position their product in the market?
     
    #91
  42. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    Pros use heavy, headlight sticks and predominately thin beamed sticks. Average strung weight is 12.6 oz and almost 8 points HL. You can research beam size, but my guess is between 75-80% are thin beams. I just counted thru the current top 25 and it was almost 80% using thin beams. So, they use "players rackets". Swingweight is not captured in the table but ATP pros are typically in the 340-380 range with a few below and a few above. Djoko, Fed, and Nadal are all in 350-375 range. To me a 12.6 oz, 8 HL, 360 SW thin beamed racket can be called a "player's racket" but it is not a low powered racket. A 360 SW is pretty much a weapon of mass destruction if you can handle it - it will have loads of power. I cannot handle those specs as I am an old guy. I am not advocating ametuers use pro level specs - too much for mere mortals. But, I do think something between the pro 12.6/360SW and the retail 11 oz/306 SW is better for ametuers.

    WTA is lighter, wider, and less HL. But, average swingweight on WTA is still higher than stock rackets.

    Name Weight(g) Weight(oz) Balance(cm) Balance(inch) Lenghth Length(inch) headlight(in.) points HL
    DANIEL NESTOR 374 13.19 29.1 11.46 69.5 27.36 2.22 17.8
    JUAN MONACO 367 12.95 31.4 12.36 70 27.56 1.42 11.34
    MARIO ANCIC 366 12.91 29.3 11.54 69 27.17 2.05 16.38
    JAMES BLAKE 365 12.88 30.5 12.01 68.5 26.97 1.48 11.81
    KEVIN ULLYETT 360 12.7 29.5 11.61 70 27.56 2.17 17.32
    STANISLAS WAWRINKA 359 12.66 31 12.2 68.5 26.97 1.28 10.24
    MAX MIRNYI 359 12.66 30.4 11.97 68.5 26.97 1.52 12.13
    ANDREAS SEPPI 356 12.56 30.8 12.13 70 27.56 1.65 13.23
    NICOLAS KIEFER 350 12.35 32.2 12.68 69 27.17 0.91 7.24
    JONAS BJORKMAN 349 12.31 30.2 11.89 70 27.56 1.89 15.12
    JUAN-IGNACIO CHELA 349 12.31 32.8 12.91 70 27.56 0.87 6.93
    RICHARD GASQUET 349 12.31 31.5 12.4 68.5 26.97 1.08 8.66
    JARKKO NIEMINEM 348 12.28 30.5 12.01 71 27.95 1.97 15.75
    ARNAUD CLEMENT 348 12.28 30.8 12.13 70.5 27.76 1.75 14.02
    SIMON ASPELIN 348 12.28 31 12.2 68.5 26.97 1.28 10.24
    NICOLAS LAPENTTI 348 12.28 31.5 12.4 68.5 26.97 1.08 8.66
    PAVEL VIZNER 347 12.24 31 12.2 69.5 27.36 1.48 11.81
    IVO KARLOVIC 347 12.24 31.5 12.4 69 27.17 1.18 9.45
    VINCENT SPADEA 347 12.24 30.5 12.01 68.5 26.97 1.48 11.81
    FILIPPO VOLANDRI 347 12.24 30.8 12.13 68.5 26.97 1.36 10.87
    SEBASTIEN GROSJEAN 345 12.17 31.7 12.48 71 27.95 1.5 11.97
    NENAD ZIMONJIC 344 12.13 30.7 12.09 69.5 27.36 1.59 12.76
    PAUL HANLEY 340 11.99 30.4 11.97 70 27.56 1.81 14.49
    TOMMY ROBREDO 340 11.99 31.5 12.4 69.5 27.36 1.28 10.24
    MARC GICQUEL 340 11.99 31.2 12.28 68.5 26.97 1.2 9.61
    PAUL-HENRI MATHIEU 338 11.92 31.3 12.32 68.5 26.97 1.16 9.29
    NICOLAS ALMAGRO 337 11.89 31.2 12.28 68.5 26.97 1.2 9.61
    POTITO STARACE 336 11.85 31 12.2 68.5 26.97 1.28 10.24
    G.GARCIA LOPEZ 336 11.85 31.5 12.4 68.5 26.97 1.08 8.66
    J.W TSONGA 335 11.82 31 12.2 69.5 27.36 1.48 11.81
    FERNANDO VERDASCO 335 11.82 30.4 11.97 68.5 26.97 1.52 12.13
    MICHAEL LLODRA 333 11.75 30.8 12.13 68.5 26.97 1.36 10.87
    OLIVIER ROCHUS 331 11.68 31.1 12.24 71.5 28.15 1.83 14.65
    THOMAS JOHANSSON 331 11.68 31.2 12.28 68.5 26.97 1.2 9.61
    JC FERRERO 330 11.64 32.5 12.8 71.5 28.15 1.28 10.24
    DAVID FERRER 330 11.64 32 12.6 71 27.95 1.38 11.02
    NIKOLAY DAVYDENKO 330 11.64 32 12.6 70 27.56 1.18 9.45
    FABRICE SANTORO 328 11.57 31 12.2 71 27.95 1.77 14.17
    GILLES SIMON 327 11.53 31 12.2 68.5 26.97 1.28 10.24
    MIKHAIL YOUZHNY 320 11.29 31 12.2 68.5 26.97 1.28 10.24
    RAFAEL NADAL 319 11.25 32.5 12.8 68.5 26.97 0.69 5.51
    ALBERT MONTANES 316 11.15 33 12.99 70 27.56 0.79 6.3
    JURGEN MELZER 314 11.08 31.2 12.28 70.5 27.76 1.59 12.76
    FELICIANO LOPEZ 312 11.01 32.4 12.76 70 27.56 1.02 8.19
    CARLOS MOYA 306 10.79 36.2 14.25 69 27.17 -0.67 -5.35
    Unstrung Averages 340.8 12.022 31.24666667 12.30133333 69.4 27.32377778 1.36 10.87822222
    Strung Projections 357.8 12.622 12.00133333 0.985 7.878222222
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2013
    #92
  43. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    95 sq. inches or less?

    That would mean that most ATP pros don't play with a "players" stick.
     
    #93
  44. Power Player

    Power Player G.O.A.T.

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    As CJC says most pros are still using the thinner beam players sticks. That will probably change over time when the 16 year old kids using Babs grow up and go pro. They will probably use softer versions of the tweeners though.

    I firmly believe after 3 years of strong holicing to use what you grew up with until you simply can not anymore. I always come back to a stick that is a more modern weighted version of what I used as a kid and I play better as a result now. A players stick now was not called that when I was a junior. It was just a tennis racquet to me, but when I came back to the game I just could never jive with the stiff, thick beams (I have tried many times).

    In 10 years will everyone be using Babs or will a lot more people have TE and rediscover soft, control sticks? Or maybe by then poly will be banned and everyone will have to use gut strings again.Who knows what will happen. Point is, it doesnt matter..use what works for your game.
     
    #94
  45. eidolonshinobi

    eidolonshinobi Professional

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    Are these unstrung or strung specs?
     
    #95
  46. bluetrain4

    bluetrain4 Legend

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    What qualifies as "thin-beamed" today?
     
    #96
  47. Power Player

    Power Player G.O.A.T.

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    I'd go with 22mm or less.
     
    #97
  48. Timbo's hopeless slice

    Timbo's hopeless slice Hall of Fame

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    double post, timbo is an idiot
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2013
    #98
  49. Timbo's hopeless slice

    Timbo's hopeless slice Hall of Fame

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    so where are the specs for the current top 20?
    These averages are thrown a bit by the presence of some very heavy racquets in the hands of players that are hardly relevant in 2013.
    (Vince Spadea? Really???)

    obviously this is from some years ago, although it is interesting to note how many of them were running unstrung weights in the low 11oz range even then, certainly more than I would have thought.

    I would also like to see the most telling stat recorded, head size.

    Most here define a 'player's racquet' as smaller than 95" at most and I don't think there are too many of those in the current top 20..

    This is at the heart of what I am saying, and it is the one thing you have left out.
     
    #99
  50. greystar403

    greystar403 Rookie

    Joined:
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    My friend actually broke a BLX Six.One Tour off or a frame shot.

    Right there I swore I wouldn't use a players racquet.
     

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