PLaying a first time player

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by BSousa, Jul 28, 2004.

  1. BSousa

    BSousa Rookie

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    I have a friend that wants to have a match with me tomorrow. He never played a racquet but is filled with enthusiasm.

    He has an idea that it is rather easy to play (I think PS2 games given him that idea).

    What should I do? I don't want to crush him as far as to put him off playing. But I don't want to force myself to lose points. I'm usually a baseline player, but recently been trying with S&V. While I'm not that good at it, I'm pretty sure my S&V is more than enough to defeat a first time player, so just changing playing style isn't reallly the solution.

    I was thinking maybe trying a full slice game to practise my slice and maybe allow the balls to be slower for him to hit, but I don't know if the low balls will defeat the purpose of the slower balls.

    I already told him he can get 3 serve chances (I would give him more but that would probably delay the game too much).

    I'm a bit lost here, any ideas would be helpful.

    And forget about my left arm, it sucks to much I can't even even serve under with it :)

    Thanks
    Bruno
     
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  2. Camilio Pascual

    Camilio Pascual Hall of Fame

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    I would warn him about his inexperience and ask him if he would like to practice and do drills for a month or so before playing. Assuming he declines and is a good friend, I would then go out there and play as perfectly and beautifully as I could and try to crush him 6-0, 6-0 and keep him to winning as few points as possible. I'd then shake his hand at the end, compliment him for having the guts to stick it out, and offer to coach him and work with him so he can develop as a tennis player.
     
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  3. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Play a set lefty and then a set righty. That way both of you can win and feel good and you can both still play at your best and not be screwing around with your game. It's is good to work on new shots then and going to net. Play lefty so you see how it feels to get whipped up on so you can see what it's like to be in his shoes once again.

    I did that this weekend with my 3.0 friend and he enjoyed the different challenges of both of my hands. Even though I beat him 6-2 with my lefty he focused on consistency and getting as many balls back. When playing me righty he played more aggressively and we both played at a higher level with the balls moving much faster. So it was still enjoyable for both of us and he won some games too so he didn't get too frustrated.
     
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  4. BSousa

    BSousa Rookie

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    Thanks for the suggestions...

    Camilio: unfortunally he is a bit to proud to allow me to teach him right now, I'm still afraid crushing him wouldn't be the nicest thing to do, he is an alright fellow. Last time I had a similiar situation and I crushed someone (literally he didn't made any points except for my double faults) the guy didn't want to play (at least with me) again.

    Kevhen: I'll give my left wing a go, but only after serving. I've tried doing a few serves with my left arm today and the ones I actually hit the ball (most I didn't) I either frame it, or sent it over the fence :) Groundstokes against backboard weren't totally bad.

    I've decided to also only use second serves. Twist serve for the first (I can only get it in once in a while) and for second serves, I'll probably use slice serves only as they are slower.

    I'm also going to use a lot of lobs, they aren't easy to reply but it allows him a lot more time to setup at least. And thats one thing I think I need the practise right now (specially moonballs).

    Another thing I think I can do is to always try to return his balls on the rise. While when I can it is a bit harder for him, I still tend to net a few balls on this, so he may actually think it was his game and not my stupid errors that caused him to win the point. Not sure if this is good or not, but he may get a bit more into tennis if he thinks he can do a few good shots.

    If after all this, I'm still crushing him, I may talk to him about changing the way scores are done. Maybe 40-40 is my loss, or he only has to win by 30 depending on his skill.

    Just 2 more hours to go :)

    Bruno
     
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  5. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Just lob your serves in with your left hand, hit them flat, and see if he can attack them successfully. If he can, then just hit second serves with your right hand before resuming the match left-handed.

    I wouldn't change scoring but maybe work on new parts of your game like moonballs, slice, vollies, 2hand or 1hand backhand, etc to keep the match more exciting and competitive. Also you could just work on consistency and depth while hittng at the pace that he can still get balls back at for some long rallies.
     
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  6. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Work him and work him hard. Until he gives!
     
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  7. Rackethead

    Rackethead Rookie

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    Just try and feed him back easy balls with slow but not too slow pace, close enough for him to get to easily so he can get some practice hitting the ball. You should beat him easily anyways because he should defeat himself. This way he will get the most practice.

    You should also give him easy serves without too much spin or pace so that he can see it easily and have time to setup.

    This will make the game challenging for you -- you have to give him a good ball to hit on every point. At the same time he will have fun and learn something.

    Of course...if this is about egos...and it is important for you to win...than that is another story.
     
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  8. wt888usa

    wt888usa Rookie

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    Sometimes when I play with less experiences friends, I let them hit on a larger court, meaning if they hit in the doubles lanes it's not out for them, so I'd have to cover more court. But when I hit back, I have to keep it in the singles court. Also sometimes I only give myself one serve while they get two (or three) serves.
     
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  9. BSousa

    BSousa Rookie

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    Just came from the game, 6-0 and 4-1 (time up) set I lost was by double faultng all the four points.

    I gave him 3 serves, that was the only thing he took. I gave him the doubles alley and he didn't want them (wasn't fairacording to him). He even complained of me playing too slowly and being condescent with him (I was on the serves a bit as I tried hitting 2 flat serves and he sent both balls to the other court :)) I also tried the left hand and straigh lob games. Sad to say he was only able to take 2 points that weren't me double faulting :(He had fantastic speed, but no racquet control at all, and for some reason, even after I told him to keep his eyes on the ball, he said he wouldn't (it wasn't right according to him)

    Next time he accepted doing just some simple drills and no games. :)

    Thanks for all the help
    Buno
     
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  10. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Hey you took it too him!!!! Now maybe he will be teachable!
     
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  11. Awesome, at least he wants to learn how to play better.

    Crushing a newbie isn't good. It will turn them off of the game. However, some displays of excellent shotmaking (like a huge forehand) will draw them into the game because that shot was so awesome and they want to learn it.
    Nice work.
     
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  12. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, now he will want to practice more before playing again which is the key to improving at the lowest levels. I still say play him one set with each hand playing at your very best and don't worry about losing left-handed since that will give him a feeling of accomplishment and some confidence and extra motivation to keep working on improving.
     
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  13. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    When you play a beginner, give him a lot of puff shots so he can return to you. Make sure the ball doesn't take a high bounce because he'll never get to it. A beginner should not be able to slam it on you so take the opportunity to try new things like a 1hbh if you use a 2hbh or drop shots. Playing a beginner is good practice time for new tools so make it fun for both of you and remember, don't slam any shots on him.
     
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  14. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Why would you take the opportunity to try a onehanded backhand if your a twohander? Drop shots I can see but implementing a stroke you decided to not inlcude in your aresenal can be detrimental. Why not practice the slice backhand if you have a twohander. Is that what you meant?
     
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  15. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    No, Bill, I meant try something new. I developed a 1hbh by playing a beginner who was eager to learn and I just started hitting the 1hbh to mess around.
     
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