Playing in a cold temperature. Tension

Discussion in 'Strings' started by Adidas_Anderson, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. Adidas_Anderson

    Adidas_Anderson Semi-Pro

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    I have a questions on what tension range you usually string under cold circumstances? i play on those concrete hard courts, they are pretty slow and the ball is not coming to you...
    I uses a youtek prestige Mp... where i usually string my tension around 57 to 60 , thats my regular set up in hot weather and on fast hard courts. But i have been struggling with the pop on the racket in cold conditions... :(
    I have 3 choices, Full set of alu power or Wilson NXT , or i go for a hybird.
    any suggestions :oops:?
     
  2. mrmike

    mrmike Rookie

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    I would just drop the tension down a bit on whatever string setup you prefer. Wilson NXT (multi) and ALU power (poly) are two totally different string types. All I can say about that is NXT is a lot easier on the arm than ALU but you need to go with what string type works for your game.
     
  3. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I mostly play in sub 60 degree weather, once every month in 65.
    About 50lbs is great for 95-100 sq in rackets. Enough suppleness to hit touch shots, stiff enough for flat first serves.
     
  4. Adidas_Anderson

    Adidas_Anderson Semi-Pro

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    Really thanks for the comments!
    i dont really have problem with better feel on which strings,
    but just curious on what strings are preferable to play in cold weathers. I think the tension is the main issue , for the reason i suggested those option is that i only have them on hand :)

    Btw will going below 50 will too low?
    Cheers x
     
  5. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Most current men's pros are using around 50 nowadaze. Obviously, not all.
    To me, not everyone else, once I drop into the mid 40's, a different stroke is needed than my normal wild loosely gripped fast swings. I need to use more control, more conservative, more direct swings for the lower tensions. I hate that. I want the ball to come off the racket quickly, but with some feel.
    But strings are cheap. Experiment with $2.50 nylon, find the tension you like, then add good strings.
     
  6. jonestim

    jonestim Professional

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    I think you are going to need to define "cold." I find I can play with a full poly setup with tensions around 45 until it gets below about 50 degrees. I find that a gut/poly setup still works well down to the low 40 degrees. If it is below 40 I am probably playing with no poly in the racquet, and most likely I am using a different frame with more power.

    Your racquet should play fine with a poly tension below 50. It is a denser pattern that I use and you may find you end up liking it that low even when you are playing in warm weather.

    If the temps are in the 40s I would see how the NXT is by itself.
     
  7. 3fees

    3fees Hall of Fame

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    Lower 50's is good all year around for me, using- copolys.
     
  8. Adidas_Anderson

    Adidas_Anderson Semi-Pro

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    thing is becoz of the temperature , the ball just doesn't seem have enough pop, Ball feels hard and most of my balls drop short.
    Thanks for the suggestions guys.

    Probably i will go for a hybird anyway but dropping the tension around 49lbs :)
     
  9. lstewart

    lstewart Rookie

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    I find a tension drop of 2 or 3 lbs in the winter helps offset all the factors between fast warm weather tennis and cold temp issues.
     
  10. KenC

    KenC Professional

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    Technically, the air is less heavy in the colder weather so the ball flies faster through it. This is why many will up the tension a few pounds in the cold months. But you seem to be already playing at a high tension so I would suggest dropping a few lbs. of tension in the summer.

    As for strings, things just feel more jarring in the colder temps, so I would suggest using a nice soft multi in a full bed.
     
  11. lstewart

    lstewart Rookie

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    The air is less heavy in the winter, but for me the difference in how the ball and string react to low temps is a much bigger factor. Balls are much harder and don't bounce as well, while the string at the same tension feels tighter / stiffer. Look at golf as an example. Go hit your driver with it 95 degrees and then with it 35 degrees. You lose distance in the winter with the same ball / club combo, if the balls have been in the cold temp for a little while.
     
  12. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Huh? Hot air rises because it is less dense???
     
  13. netguy

    netguy Semi-Pro

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    The reason why you can't control the ball during the winter is irrelevant, just adjust the tension accordingly to keep the ball as deep as you intend. cheers!
     
  14. fortun8son

    fortun8son Hall of Fame

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    What's wrong with the string and tension in your signature?
    If you want more power, try the Intellistring @55.
     
  15. KenC

    KenC Professional

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    erroneous post....
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2012
  16. KenC

    KenC Professional

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    Wait a minute, I just talked to my coach and he says it is better to lower tension in the winter because the ball is less responsive and this would weigh more than differences in the air.
     
  17. chopstic

    chopstic New User

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    Actually. Cold air is more dense. And therefor heavier than warm air.
     
  18. JT_2eighty

    JT_2eighty Hall of Fame

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    All I know is when I play outdoors in cold weather (30-40 degrees F), if I use the same racquet setup that I did in the summer heat, it takes a lot more effort to power through the ball and strings feel a lot stiffer in 30-40 degrees while they feel very soft and lively in 80-90 degrees.

    I can use full Lux BBO in the summer and it feels great outdoors. In the cold I do that and my arm falls off and balls land way short. The weather, to me, affects the strings (especially poly) more than it may affect the 'ball's movement through the air'. This is just my observation, I'm no scientist.

    So, I'd say, lower your tension for cold weather, or use a more powerful string (multi, gut, syn gut, etc).
     
  19. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Your coach is correct.


    That is how I should have responded. I reread my previous post and it is confusing not erroneous.
     
  20. KenC

    KenC Professional

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    It had nothing to do with your post. I thought winter air let the ball fly through the air faster because there is less humidity to cut through than on hot muggy days.
     
  21. Adidas_Anderson

    Adidas_Anderson Semi-Pro

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    You highlighted what i was going to ask lol ....i am poor at making the point :?
    Thats what i felt while i was playing in the cold , it takes me much more power to generate power with the inteli string @55lbs.
    I also strung a 54 alu power + Nxt17 on my youtek Speed 18x20.
    At first i thought it was my inteli tour having the problem , but when i hit with the speed i find it hard to generate the power as well , much different feel comapred in summer time.
    At summer in asia, its around 32 to 35 degrees and i am in europ now its like 9 to 10 degrees :S...
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2012
  22. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Humidity does have an effect, but temperature is a bigger factor.
     
  23. fortun8son

    fortun8son Hall of Fame

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    Everything is stiffer in the cold.
    The ball, the strings, the frame, the court, your joints...
    More elastic strings at lower tension is the way to go.
     
  24. corbind

    corbind Professional

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    How sure are you about the bolded part?

    http://www.weatherdudes.com/facts_display.php?fact_id=51

    "Did You Know that Cold Air is heavier than Warm Air?

    Cold air is much heavier than warm air and this is the basis for much of what we call weather. Did you ever notice after taking a hot shower, that when you first open the door to the bathroom, the cooler air from outside the bathroom comes in at the lowest level? Or how about when you open your freezer, you could feel the cold air just rush downward towards the floor. Cold air in the atmosphere behaves the same way and this is why it stays separate from air that is warmer.

    Why is cold air heavier than warm air? Cold air is denser than warm air. The molecules are packed closer together. The amount of water vapor in the air also affects the density of the air. The more water vapor that is in the air, the less dense the air becomes. That is why cold, dry air is much heavier than warm, humid air. You may have heard that a baseball or a golf ball will travel further on a warm, humid day than it would on a cold, dry day. Since the warm, humid air is less dense, the ball travels through it with less friction."
     
  25. corbind

    corbind Professional

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    For sure temperature plays a role in how long we hit on a particular day. If you use the same racquet, same tension, same strings...

    • At 95 degrees balls will go farther (need much less effort for the thing to fly long)
    • At 45 degrees balls will go much shorter (need more effort to hit far)
     
  26. Adidas_Anderson

    Adidas_Anderson Semi-Pro

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    good explanation :)
     
  27. PKfan1

    PKfan1 Semi-Pro

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    Is there no rule of thumb that stringers or players use for temp adjustments? e.g. for every 10 degrees drop 2 lbs

    Monday I played and it was almost 70 out, and I wasn't missing. I could hit out and everything was going in. I played two sets w/o a double fault. Yesterday I played in 45 degrees and it was completely different. I couldn't keep the balls in to save my life, and I think I had like 12 double faults in two sets. My technique was no different, but I think I wasn't getting the same amount of spin. How do I compensate for the temp?

    I use BHB7 16 @60 normally.
     
  28. heartattack

    heartattack Semi-Pro

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    just had my racquet strung at a tighter tension after the end of the summer. now it is cold, i just put a 3 pound dumbbell on the string bed overnight and it feels good hitting indoors.
     
  29. Adidas_Anderson

    Adidas_Anderson Semi-Pro

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    does that really work?
    losing the tensions out?
     
  30. RobDood

    RobDood New User

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    Would poly strings be better in the winter or synethic strings be a better choice. Do they have a low chance of breaking easier?
     
  31. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Strange...
    Here in BerkeleyCa., Monday was 70 degrees and sunny, and most of my shots ran long, was mishit, or just plain overhit.
    Today, closer to 52 degrees, I was seeing the ball much better (no sun, just high fog), and most of my shots were going as intended.
    I can honestly say I played at wild 3.5 levels on Monday, and closer to strong 4.5 today. Monday, was dying of sweat, couldn't adjust my position, and was hitting shellshocked from the speed of the ball.
    Today, cool and calm, the ball was huge, it was moving slowly, and I had plenty of time to hit it.
     
  32. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    To be fair here.....
    I played against the same guy. He's from Iran, used to playing in 90 degree heat and bright sunlight. Monday was his conditions, as he could wear shorts and t shirt, could run and move.
    Today, he was freezing in warmups, I was fine in shorts and T, as I'm from the fog belt of SanFrancisco.
     
  33. heartattack

    heartattack Semi-Pro

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    you bet cha!
     
  34. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    I second the concept of stringing slightly lower tensions for colder climates. Ball doesn't travel as far.

    Also increased altitudes, string lower.
     
  35. corbind

    corbind Professional

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    Nope. As the altitude increases air becomes "thinner" with less resistance. Think Denver football they can pass the ball and kick far. Think Rockies baseball they can jack the ball out of the park.

    Stringing lower would increase power and you'd be hitting ground strokes to the fence. I used to live at 6,000 feet. String higher tension the higher the altitude! ;)

    • Note that sea-level balls fly ridiculously long at high elevation. Manufacturers make high-altitude balls that compensate for that. Sadly some chains still carry low-altitude balls in high-altitude cities.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2012
  36. rev200g

    rev200g Rookie

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    Just played last night in ~0 degrees C (~32 degrees F) and everything plays stiffer including my joints. My fingers actually started to numb up. Given Vancouver's typical rainy and cold fall/winter I am not complaining though. :)
     
  37. corbind

    corbind Professional

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    You have lost your mind! Brrrrrr.....
     
  38. heartattack

    heartattack Semi-Pro

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    corbind, good point there. How about if your living in a city with an altitude 4000km above sea level and temperature ranging from -10C to -20C?
    i notice that air is thinner above waist line and dense air below. when i hit tennis balls, feels so heavy.
     
  39. Adidas_Anderson

    Adidas_Anderson Semi-Pro

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    i have a question on Full set.
    Poly or Multi will be more lively under cold temperature?
     

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