Please Roger get a coach, you need a coach BADLY!

Discussion in 'General Pro Player Discussion' started by federerfanatic, Aug 18, 2007.

  1. federerfanatic

    federerfanatic Banned

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    Watching Federer play Hewitt right now is a horrendous experience. I have never seen him look worse then he has over this period, not only today, but the last 5 months.

    To say he got some real luck at both the French Open and Wimbledon would be an understatement. Davydenko should have beaten him in straight sets in the French Open semis, it was a big Christmas gift collapse in all 3 sets by Nikolay, wrapped in a pretty pink ribbon. Youzhny even gave him some gifts in the 4th round. It was not Roger's tennis that won him those matches, it was his aura.

    Then at Wimbledon he could have easily been down 2 sets to 0 to clay courter Ferrero. He honestly had no business winning any of the first 4 sets of the final with Nadal. Only in the 5th set was he the better player.

    He needs to get over his stubborn attitude and ego (I dont mean that in a bad way, having an ego is part of being a champion but you need to bite your tongue sometimes) and get a coach. He desperately needs one, it is a MUST. He will not keep getting this luck forever playing the kind of tennis he has played since March.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2007
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  2. Zets147

    Zets147 Banned

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    Roger, give me a call. I'll be your coach.
     
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  3. Kim

    Kim Semi-Pro

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    ...and and he should listen to you.

    Don't you think he knows his age, and is pacing himself now more than ever? The guy wants longevity, should he exert THAT much effort if he can win with less? Do you think he cares for some measly titles which he has won 10000000000000000 times? He cares...for GS, period. If he is to break that record, he must survive, pace..and again have longevity.

    Also, obviously you don't know Sampras' record (after all he is the guy before FED being touted as GOAT), Sampras NEVER had a year with less than 11 losses per year when he was no.1!!! And here comes FED, during his 4 years so far at No.1, he has lost a total LESS than one of Sampras's average years!!! And now the guy is 41 - 6 win/loss...and his fans aren't happy? Pls...give him a break...It seems many so called Fed-Fanatics are just spoiled tennis fans and newbies who thinks that having so FEW loses per year as FED has done so far is the NORMAL thing...Well, folks, what Fed has done, and is doing right now, IS UNRIVALED IN HISTORY.

    And when he doesn't produce "magic", some "fans" call his game crap? WTH is the matter with you guys???

    And it's not luck that he wins...the fact is he wins beautifully, he wins easily, he wins hard, he wins ugly, but he wins SOMEHOW..that's why he is Federer and that's what will make him even more mentally tough for a player like Nadal (who btw always wins UGLY..well, almost always) especially in th FO...in fact winning ugly may be the only way to win the French Open someday...

    The point is, Fed knows what he is doing, and you (and me) don't.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2007
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  4. David L

    David L Hall of Fame

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    Round of applause.
     
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  5. federerfanatic

    federerfanatic Banned

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    Of course not. These forums are just a place for all of us to express our own opinions and ideas. We know they have no impact on what the players do, however we enjoy giving our own opinions and views. So what is your point?

    This makes no sense. If you are pacing yourself by playing worse tennis, you end up playing longer matches and use up even more energy. Would you say struggling, and still somehow winning longer matches in Cincinnati this week is helping him preserve himself?

    If he didnt he would just give half hearted efforts and lose early in more of these events. He isnt doing that, so clearly this is not the case.

    Read all of the above and you will see why what he is currently doing has nothing to do with this.

    Well the fact todays tour is more full of chokers and players who lack gumption is looking more painfully true all the time. Since at the moment Federer is almost getting by, as much as he is, on smoke and mirrors, and his aura.

    Aura, players letting him off the hook, his getting away with squandering opportunities and increasingly sloppy play, call it whatever you want then.
     
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  6. Rafa freak

    Rafa freak Semi-Pro

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    my dad said he would like to teach federer hes been a tennis coach for
    longer than federer has been alive.
     
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  7. Michelangelo

    Michelangelo Professional

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    Why bother? I believe his era will end pretty soon.
     
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  8. nickb

    nickb Banned

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    I dont think there will be much your dad can teach Roger Federer...
     
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  9. Kim

    Kim Semi-Pro

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    He is pacing himself BUY NOT PUTTING 100% effort in retrieving every ball, in smashing every forehand, etc etc. A short intense workout is more draining than a long but relatively tame workout. That's the point.

    Just go be a Nadal or Djoko fan. Leave Fed alone. You don't like his game at the moment and diss him, but sing all praises when he gets back to his magic? Exactly what the movie THE FAN expounds on.
     
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  10. lethalfang

    lethalfang Professional

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    When you have 11 Grand Slam titles, those Masters Series seem small and irrelevant, and you don't take them much more seriously than an exhibition.
     
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  11. federerfanatic

    federerfanatic Banned

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    I am not just talking about his play in the Masters events. I am talking about his play in the Grand Slams too. His play in the Masters is actually the same way he is playing in the Grand Slams. People just look at his results, they dont analyze where his current game is going. As I mentioned he got quite lucky at both the French Open and Wimbledon this year, to reach what he did at each.
     
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  12. Kim

    Kim Semi-Pro

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    That shows what Fed is, even half-heartedly, he wins...now isn't that a way to demoralize your opposition?

    I remember Fed "joking" at the Australian Open that he came not to play well and lose, but to play bad and still win.

    The point is, he more than any player in history, is doing his job. PERIOD.
     
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  13. Kim

    Kim Semi-Pro

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    Another thing that needs pacing is the mental aspect of the game, the motivation. A man cannot be as focused all the time and not get bored.
     
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  14. Challenger

    Challenger Semi-Pro

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    I wouldn't call myself a Fed fan, first and foremost, but I do enjoy watching him play. I think the reason most "fans" are criticizing him of late, is because they're well aware of what he's capable of. I find that I no longer care if he wins or loses, since I've already seen him do it all. I watch him play because I want to see once-in-a-generation greatness...and when I get anything less, I feel somewhat disappointed and short-changed.

    Is that a sign of being spoiled? I admit, yes. But at the same time, what's wrong with expecting an awe-inspiring performance from a player you know can come up with it routinely?
     
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  15. catspaw

    catspaw Rookie

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    Don't all players have a little bit of luck here and there? Is it something that Federer isn't allowed, but everyone else is? And I'm not sure what you mean by luck here anyway. At Wimby he had a tricky match against Ferrero having been laid up for a week because of the rain and Haas's withdrawal. If he ever deserved to win a Wimby final for sheer determination when the chips were down, it was this year - luck doesn't come into it. And, as for the French semi-final against Davydenko, yes, it certainly could have gone the other way, but it didn't; if Davy can't get his act together when it matters, and Fed can, what's your point - isn't that what tennis is all about?

    So he needs a coach? Why? To point out that his game's a bit shabby at the moment? I think he knows that.
     
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  16. David L

    David L Hall of Fame

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    Well, evidently he cannot come up with it as routinely as he would like, otherwise he would. As the most talented player on tour, he often comes through on top, but he is playing players who are very talented themselves. I still don't understand why people just expect him to roll over the opposition like they are amateurs. He makes it look easy sometimes, but it is'nt and some days are better than others. There are imponderables that are sometimes out of his control.
     
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  17. c_zimma

    c_zimma Semi-Pro

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    Federer is pacing himself I think. I mean, when you look at him play, and then you look at Nadal, there is an obvious difference in energy being expended. And Roger is still on top of the tennis world. So I think we should let him do his thing however he feels necessary.
     
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  18. J-man

    J-man Hall of Fame

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    I'd agree that he needs a coach. A second pair of eyes is always good for any player no matter who they are. But in the Pro's Match Results section someone posted an arcticle about how Roger feel's fine not having a coach at this time and is not an a hurry to find one.
     
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  19. federerfanatic

    federerfanatic Banned

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    I dont see how anyone can deny Federer got lucky in his French Open semifinal with Davydenko, and his Wimbledon final with Nadal. Davydenko had a chance to close out every one of the 3 sets, and visibly choked closing out all 3 sets. Nadal outplayed Federer in each of the first 4 sets of the Wimbledon final, but Federer was able to come up with enough crucial serves to squeek out holds and then won tiebreaks to win 2 of the 4 sets.
     
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  20. tennispro11

    tennispro11 Hall of Fame

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    LOL! He keeps winning right. He needs a coach because after he got rid of Roche he was winning more without a coach than with one. You bring up the Wimbledon final. He won that too, didn't he. I think you need to get over yourself and quit thinking that Federer should listen to you. He is obviously doing fine.
     
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  21. tennispro11

    tennispro11 Hall of Fame

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    Well said! I am always amazed at how Federer can win even when he isn't playing his best. It is simply terrific!
     
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  22. federerfanatic

    federerfanatic Banned

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    Great?!? The two of them were dumping easy errors and trading chokes back and forth. If that is great tennis I would hate to see what a slopfest would look like.
     
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  23. ninman

    ninman Hall of Fame

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    Did you watch the same match as everyone else? We could argue that Safin was lucky back in 2005 when we beat Federer having had to save match points in the fourth set. Tennis is all about coming up with the right shot at the right time and Federer did it.

    Yes he's been playing badly all week, but guess what HE'S IN THE FINAL. Federer knows what he has to do to win, so we should all just trust that Federer knows what's best for him and leave it at that. In 2004 he won 3/4 GS without a coach and took 11 titles that year, where he played some outstanding tennis. In 2005 when he won this title I saw him play crap all week, somehow made the final, then won in straight sets.

    Tennis is not about what happens when you play good, it's about trying to win when you are playing bad, and that's what Federer has been doing all week. Stop giving him such a hard time, 8 finals from 11 events played is a brilliant effort.
     
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  24. federerfanatic

    federerfanatic Banned

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    Federer did not come up with shots at the right moment in that French Open semi with Nikolay to get out of trouble, not many of them anyway. Davydenko got tight and was a different player then the rest of the match. That was obvious watching.

    Thanks to the fact 3 of the top 4 were out early with injury or upset. That plus guys seem to be scared at the prospect of beating a Federer ripe for the picking. Right now his aura is saving him alot, but that wont continue if he doesnt start to play better.
     
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  25. Fumoffu

    Fumoffu Rookie

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    Right, so by being able to come up with good shots he is lucky. I guess he is the luckiest player in history, being able to come up with great shots at crucial moments.. Wait.. Don't they call people like those champions?

    Please, you're just piffed that he's able to win without playing like a god. That alone is what separates him from the pack, that is why he's ranked 1. He's just that much better. I won't say as to whether or not he's pacing himself or whatnot but I will say he WINS, regardless of what happens during a match the only thing that is recorded in the history books is the WINS.
     
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  26. natasha_nana

    natasha_nana Rookie

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    He may need a coach - but I would not base that on his Cincy performance...as you may remember, Roger has NEVER played well at Cincy.

    In 2005 he won the tournament with a C- performance all through...getting taken to 3 sets by Ginepri FFS.

    Also, last year in Halle he by no means won the tournament on a stellar performance...but we all know what happened at Wimbledon that year.

    So I would personally reserve the 'Roger needs a coach' talk till after the USO.
    Let's see how it goes there first.
     
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  27. federerfanatic

    federerfanatic Banned

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    What I am saying is Nadal was so clearly the better player in the first 4 sets f the final, that regardless that I was cheering for Federer, it still seemed the wrong player probably wrong. Commentators on the match basically said the same thing. After the first early exchange of breaks, Federer was struggling so much to hold, while Nadal was crusing on his own serve pretty much. So yes Federer was pretty lucky to somehow split the first 4 sets the way the overall course of play between the two was.

    I did not say all of his wins were luck. I am saying the last 5 months his tennis has been by far the worst since he became #1, his play on break points has also been a disaester in many ways, and he has gotten luck in his last 2 slams I feel.
     
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  28. anchorsteamer

    anchorsteamer Rookie

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    Why does having a coach necessarily help? Most coaches are glorified traveling mates that warm you up and keep you entertained on the road...why does Federer need that? Not saying there aren't good coaches out there, but just making a blanket statement that he needs a coach is dumb. It's also not getting lucky to hit big serves on big points...its what being good is...
     
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  29. federerfanatic

    federerfanatic Banned

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    At Toronto last year I thought he was playing very well. The guys that took him to 3 sets really played well to take him to 3 sets, but Federer was still looking pretty good with his own game. He does not look good at all here in Cincinatti, less good then Toronto last year. His struggles in Cincinnati are more with his own game then his opponents, unlike Toronto last year. Cincinnati last year he was tired so that is a write off.

    Even if you honestly feel todays match with Hewitt was a good match, you cant honestly say he looked good in the matches before that like the ones vs Baghdatis or Almagro. Also his play on break points is very poor this year, was again today vs Hewitt, was vs Nadal in the French Open final. Last year his play on break points was much more solid.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2007
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  30. The tennis guy

    The tennis guy Hall of Fame

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    Crap again. He is playing more matches this summer than last year, but he was tired last year?
     
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  31. federerfanatic

    federerfanatic Banned

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    Last year, as you yourself said, he had 4 3 setters at the Rogers Cup, his final 4 matches there, then another in the first round of Cincinnati. So it becomes apparent why he would be too tired for the Murray match. He also looked too tired in that match to really play.
     
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  32. The tennis guy

    The tennis guy Hall of Fame

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    He won in straight set at Cincy first round last year. He played more matches this summer, had 3 3 setters already. Do your math.
     
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  33. catspaw

    catspaw Rookie

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    I think federerfanatic is almost TOO much of a fed fan to be able to see the wood for the trees. I'm a huge Fed lover and admit that I found the Hewitt match incredibly nerve-wracking to watch. Every UE is torture, every failure to convert a BP nothing less than tragic. But, if you watch the match again when you know the result, you can appreciate objectively how good the match actually was, how well Hewitt played, how Federer came up with staunch defence when necessary, and how well he eventually played in the 3rd set to get the win. He quite simply refused to lose. If he'd buckled under the pressure, I'd be worried, but he didn't, so I'm not. This need-for-a-coach business is someone trying to find reasons for Fed's lack of perfection this year. He's human, that's all - you can't play at being Superman all the time.
     
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  34. J-man

    J-man Hall of Fame

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    I agree Federer is only human and that he is not always going to play well or perfect (winning all of his matches having less than 5 losses ect....). But I still think having a coach or at the least a part time to coach (someone that doesn't need to travel everywhere with him) is a good idea. Espically when Federer hit a slight rough patch in his tennis career.
     
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  35. Kim

    Kim Semi-Pro

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    Federerfanatic, if he had been a Sampras fan, would long have cursed Sampras and 10000000000 of his relatives to Sampras' 10000000000th generation for having played so "crappy" while winning 14 Slams. He would also have cursed Laver by the way he "crappily" won those 2 Grand Slam SLAMS, if he had been a Laver fan.

    People like this "THE FAN" prototype are pathetic. PLS watch THE FAN, ok?
     
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  36. Kim

    Kim Semi-Pro

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    So again, troll list grows longer, ignore list grows longer.
     
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  37. NamRanger

    NamRanger G.O.A.T.

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    This is probably his worst year yet. At least in 05 he could say that he lost to a red hot Safin, Nadal, and Nalbandian (at the TMC). Otherwise, he dominated the USO, Wimbledon, and every other major tournament out there. This year he's lost matches to Canas, Volandri (right....), Djokovic, and Nadal. I mean, seriously, two of those names really don't belong on that list. His stubborness will eventually be his downfall.
     
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  38. federerfanatic

    federerfanatic Banned

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    Thank you. Someone else notices what I have been noticing. He is playing significantly worse overall then he has since he became #1 right now, except for his serve.

    Yes he is very stubborn. Nobody is too good, even if you are someone some people call the best player ever, to hear others ideas and ways to improve. That is where a coach comes into play, and when you are both struggling and become stagnant, it is even more of a benefit/need.
     
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  39. ninman

    ninman Hall of Fame

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    You know what you're right Federer does need a coach, I mean he won the Aussie Open without dropping a set, then made the final of the French Open, then won Wimbledon, I mean what a crap player he is. If that's what it means to be ****, then every player on tour is just awful, I mean hell the number two only made 2 GS finals, he must be crap and all.
     
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  40. jukka1970

    jukka1970 Professional

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    Well for starters, you'd probably do better with a different sign in name, if you actually believe even half of what you wrote.

    Federer has been doing just fine without a coach. Let's see, he's got two grand slams so far, yet again with 11 grandslams and counting. He may not have won in Canada, but he was the runner up. And right now Federer has done a hell of a lot better in Ohio, then he usually does. 2nd round loss last year. And if you look over the years that he's played at the masters in Ohio, he has won it once, and all the other years he was out the 1st or 2nd round.

    Part of being an excellent player, is being able to get out of tough situations. And this so called aura you talk about, what it most like is, is Federer making it look like he got a gift. I have no idea what you're qualifications are in tennis, but unless you are one of the top 10 players in the ATP, signing on here under a pseudonym, I doubt you have the first clue on what Federer needs.

    I certainly have no idea what he needs, but from his statistics, he doesn't seem to need a coach. What do you expect from him, only 4 losses each year, year after year? Here's a news flash, no one can keep that up year after year, it's called being human.

    Jukka
     
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  41. ninman

    ninman Hall of Fame

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    Yeah maybe he's Nadal trying to get us all riled. If you are Nadal guess what buddy I think you're going to go out in the 3rd round if you're lucky, ha how do you like me now?
     
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  42. jukka1970

    jukka1970 Professional

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    Excellent response and points, now hopefully the OP will learn the difference between luck and great playing

    Jukka
     
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  43. jukka1970

    jukka1970 Professional

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    You can't even make a point without contradicting yourself. First you say that Federer didn't come up with shots when he needed them, then you say, oh I meant to say not many. Give it a rest already.


    More BS, the same could be said about anyone. The point is, that Federer is still finding a way to make it to the finals, and in quite a few cases winning the tournament. As someone else said, he didn't play for 5 straight days at Wimbledon, and hadn't played anyone even close to Nadal's level of play. And even with that, he still found a way to grind it out and win his 5th Wimbledon in a row. And he did it without a coach. So where is your logic, absolutely nowhere apparently.

    Jukka
     
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  44. Kim

    Kim Semi-Pro

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    Again, are you guys tennis newbies or what???? Sampras LOST TO ABSOLUTE NOBODYS ALL THE TIME, and FED loses every now and then, and he's a goner?

    By God.... according to your standards Sampras was always lucky because he used his serves to get out of trouble.

    THE GUY (FED) WINS. PERIOD.
     
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  45. kingkong

    kingkong Banned

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    you people don't seem to undertsand what a coaches role actually is:

    (interview with sampras and agassi, new york magazine 1995,(probably the best bit of tennis writing ever imo, demonstates the different roles coahes have for different players)



    "[expletive] Rusedski!" he blurts out, for the sheer joy of it; later, when I
    remind him how frequently Brad Gilbert, Agassi's notoriously gregarious coach,
    brings up the fact that Gilbert is four and four in the eight times he met
    Sampras as a player, he says, "[expletive] Brad!" He tries to point out the
    meaninglessness of the statistic. "I mean, this [expletive] guy here is 1-0
    against me," Sampras says, pointing to Annacone, who is wading in the shallow
    end with a silly grin, not quite sure whether to look proud or insulted. "You
    want to humble Brad, just ask him about the Slams," says Sampras, who is well
    aware that, despite the $5 million in prize money that Gilbert has earned in a
    long career as a sort of overachieving bottom-feeder, he never advanced beyond
    the quarterfinals in any of the four major tournaments. "Just ask him about the
    Slams."

    I pass along something that Pete Fischer, Sampras's first and most
    influential coach, recently told me: Gilbert, Fischer believes, has the
    greatest mind in tennis and he was always Fischer's first choice to coach
    Sampras if he couldn't do it himself. Sampras rolls his eyes. "Brad's got a
    good heart, but I couldn't take all that talking, discussing every angle, every
    shot," he says. "Whenever we used to practice together, I'd say, 'Brad, would
    you just shut the [expletive] up for 30 minutes.' "
    "Brad's got a lot to offer," Annacone throws in graciously.
    "Yeah, too much," says Sampras.

    Sampras has gone out of his way to give credit to Tim Gullikson for
    helping get him from No. 5 in the world to No. 1, and his feelings were
    painfully obvious when, after learning that Gullikson had cancer, Sampras
    broke down and cried on the court during his semifinal match in the Australian
    Open. But since splitting with Fischer when he was 18, Sampras has seemed to
    value his coaches more for their company than their wisdom. When Annacone, still
    wading nearby, starts expounding tennis theory, saying that a player is always
    plotting to take away the amount of time his opponent has to return a shot,
    either by hitting the ball hard or hitting it early, Sampras, without taking
    his eye off the little poolside basketball hoop he's shooting at, just says,
    "Nonsense."



    and

    What most impressed Agassi was how little Sampras leans on his coaches.
    (Agassi is now coached by Brad Gilbert, who helped him climb from No. 32 to No.
    1 in a little more than a year; Sampras's coach is Paul Annacone, who replaced
    Tim Gullikson seven months ago when Gullikson withdrew to battle brain cancer,
    for which he is now undergoing chemotherapy.) "Pete said, 'Regardless of what
    Brad's done for you, you're the one who has to go out there and do it,' " Agassi
    told me in the restaurant. "I said, 'I totally agree with you, but he's given me
    a lot of important insights." He said, 'Like what?' And I was like, 'Well, he's
    directed me here and directed me there, and given me a game plan.' And Pete was
    shocked to think that's what a coach does. All he knows is someone who makes
    sure his toss is on line and helps with the fundamentals on some very basic
    level. But nobody tells Pete how to play. Me, it's the opposite. I have all the
    shots, but what the hell do I do with them?"



    Andre Agassi, on the other hand, tends to run his psyche like an open house,
    particularly if a visitor can help him play better tennis. On an early Friday
    afternoon in the middle of this year's Wimbledon tournament, Agassi and Gilbert
    were working out on the grass practice courts at Aorangi Park. In his first two
    overpowering wins, against Andrew Painter and Patrick McEnroe, Agassi had hit
    two or three stone-cold service return winners each game, often sending the ball
    back 20 miles per hour faster than it had arrived. But for Agassi's third-round
    opponent, David Wheaton, Gilbert was preaching the rewards of moderation,
    and Agassi was listening intently.

    "If you rip it, he just keeps charging in, where all he has to do is react,"
    Gilbert explains. "Slow him down, make him hesitate,
    and he's got to think about it. That's when he gets nervous." Instead of whaling
    on the ball, Gilbert says, Agassi should hit low, dipping topspin returns that
    will freeze Wheaton. Gilbert serves a half-dozen balls and Agassi responds as
    instructed.


    you realise from this next excerpt how long agassi had his eye on Steffi Graf, as well as just how detailed Gilberts strategy was, and just what Paul Annacones role as Pete Sampras's 'coach' actually was

    Now, as Gilbert and Agassi are nearing the end of their workout at Aorangi
    Park, still plotting how to knock off David Wheaton, Agassi asks, "What
    percentage should I serve to his forehand?" as if he'll be toting a calculator
    in his shorts. They keep hitting as Gilbert spews out a steady stream of
    exhortation and non sequitur. "When the bell goes off, you got to come strong!"
    he shouts across the net. And: "Steffi's looking thin, she's looking
    razor-thin."
    And: "I swear, I couldn't get that broccoli soup out of my mind
    last night," to which Agassi responds, "Yeah, that can give you a foot cramp."
    The talk always returns to strategy, though, and Agassi can't get enough.

    espite the nearly miraculous results, there is something about Gilbert's
    nonstop coaching and Agassi's rapt attention that is just a little much,
    suggesting that the whole exercise serves more as an emotional balm than a
    point-for-point battle plan. This seems especially true when, a few minutes
    later, Gilbert and Agassi are replaced on the same court by Paul Annacone and
    Pete Sampras, who, in their own practice session, casually hit for 45 minutes
    without exchanging a single word.



    obviously federer is more like sampras than agassi.You can see how without a coach, fter a while his backhand starts to fall to peices technically, (perhaps because), his footwork and positioning get sloppy.
     
    #45
  46. kingkong

    kingkong Banned

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    #46
  47. NamRanger

    NamRanger G.O.A.T.

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    Sampras lost to nobodies in smaller events, but we know Federer takes master events seriously (at least Indian Wells, Miami, Rome, and the bigger well known ones). He lost to Canas (twice) and Volandri, and nearly lost to Roddick at the end of 06, and has nearly lost alot of matches to players of much lesser calibur then he is this year. Alot of close calls for Federer this year.


    Whenever Federer lost before he lost to quality players and talented that were on hot streaks, such as Safin, Nalbandian, Gasquet, Murray, and Nadal. Honestly the only exception that I can think of is Tomas Berdych, but we all know he's a pretty good player, top 20 right now, but could be so much more. Now he's losing to players WELL below his skill level. I mean for crying out loud, Volandri? Struggling against Almagro on hardcourts? Seriously, if you can't see why Federer is going down hill, then you are just plain ignorant.
     
    #47
  48. tennispro11

    tennispro11 Hall of Fame

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    So he is goin three sets with guys, yet still manages to win and he is going downhill. I think you are the ignorant one ranger. How many losses does he have total in four years? You shouldn't open your mouth when the only thing coming out is BS.
     
    #48
  49. saram

    saram Legend

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    Drugs kill. Put them down. Now...
     
    #49
  50. federerfanatic

    federerfanatic Banned

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    Exactly. Federer does play the Masters events all out, unlike Sampras's method. Neither is wrong neccessarily, just their preference. He just isnt playing as well anymore, that is why you see wierd things like losing to Volandri, or struggling against Almagro on hard courts. His tennis is suffering right now, it is obvious watching him play, but I guess people want to turn a blind eye and see what they want to see.
     
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