Possible for a grad student to play on a tennis team??

Discussion in 'College Tennis Talk' started by HunterST, May 26, 2014.

  1. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    I'm looking at graduate schools and I thought it would be awesome if I could possibly play on a tennis team. I would have to find a weaker school obviously, but it would still be a dream come true.

    I think this is technically possible as the NCAA rules give you 4 years of eligibility (which I have) and don't mention age.

    Have you ever heard of this? Do you think it is at all likely I could find a coach that would let me play?
     
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  2. Rob_C

    Rob_C Hall of Fame

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    What Division?? Pretty sure D I and II have the 5/10 rule where u get 5 yrs or 10 semesters to complete your 4 yrs of playing eligibility. Also, for every yr after high school you spend competing in organized tennis events, you lose a yr of eligibility.
     
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  3. HunterST

    HunterST Hall of Fame

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    Would have to be division 3 for me. I'm not good enough for I or II. I play USTA matches, but I don't think that counts against eligibility. Thanks for the response! I haven't heard of the 5/10 rule.
     
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  4. tennis_ocd

    tennis_ocd Hall of Fame

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    My understanding is any "organized competition" six months past your HS grad directly affects your eligibility time.
     
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  5. Rob_C

    Rob_C Hall of Fame

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    In that case, u might be ok.

    Another option u might consider is NAIA.
     
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  6. Gut4Tennis

    Gut4Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Division 3 and he's fine. Div 3 does not do what you mentioned
     
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  7. tennis_ocd

    tennis_ocd Hall of Fame

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    d3 does not use clearinghouse but same rules apply. one cannot (if following rules) play organized competition without losing equivalent eligibility.
     
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  8. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    As far as I know, you also have to be under the age of 27. (That's the rule here anyway, after 27 you loose all athletic eligibility.)

    -Fuji
     
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  9. ewcrider

    ewcrider New User

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    I have often wondered about this. The following passages of the 2013-2014 NCAA D3 manual seem to be of interest.
    This emphasizes the graduate school being the same as the undergraduate school.

    Regarding the 10-semester/15-quarter rule:
    What I gather from this is you have five years from when you first enter college to use your four years of eligibility. (Assuming you were a full time student for four years of undergraduate studies).

    As far as USTA play, you cannot play USTA team/league events during the college tennis season and remain eligible for that college season. It seems you can play individual tournaments though. Note this only affects those currently playing college tennis.
    Assuming you are a current undergrad, you could talk to your school's athletics department for more information. Since you have not played for the school, there may be some fancy way to transfer your remaining eligibility to the new institution. But with 14.2.2 you probably only have one year left, so the grad school's coach may not be enthusiastic about you joining the team for one year.
     
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  10. Grinding10s

    Grinding10s New User

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    You can play D1 as a grad student as long as you haven't used up your eligibility. Memphis' men's team has a grad student that plays.
     
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  11. Coach Carter

    Coach Carter Rookie

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    NAIA has 10/5 rule. Unless something has changed recently, D-3 had a running clock that started as soon as you started school first time anywhere no matter where that was and whether you were playing or not. You had 5 years to get 4 years of eligibility played...unless everything is starting to run together for me.
     
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  12. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    I've known/heard of many guys who played as grad students because they had remaining eligibility left. Typically the guys who got a medical redshirt year or who were on track to graduate early.

    I have never though heard of anyone playing as a grad student who did not play as an undergrad. Seems like it would be a tough sell if your game's been on the shelf since juniors - have you at least been playing USTA league or club tennis? Good luck. Also, please do not select your grad school on the basis of having a weak tennis team. Academics have to come first.
     
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  13. tennis ratchet

    tennis ratchet New User

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    Hmmm, apparently I'm in the minority here... Some grad schools you pay for (MBA, MD, JD, etc.), and some you're funded through the school with a stipend (humanities, sciences, etc.--most Ph.D. programs). The school covers tuition and gives you a small amount for living expenses, which you may have to augment with a loan (sorry for stating the obvious here...)

    I have a doctorate in a humanities field, and I have to say, if my advisor/program had ever heard about me spending a dozen or more hours a week playing competitive tennis, rather than writing or researching or preparing something for a conference, they would have gone ballistic. It would be considered totally unacceptable, mainly because the institution is paying for your training.

    So I'm not surprised that it's okay for post-graduate training that the student pays for out of pocket, but if you're funded by the institution, I would be very, very surprised if anyone encouraged you to play competitive tennis. Good luck!
     
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