pre-weaving more than one cross ahead

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by dominikk1985, Jan 3, 2014.

  1. dominikk1985

    dominikk1985 Legend

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    Could you do that and weave 2-3 crosses ahead (leaving a loop on each to tighten)? or would the pulling through after tensioning damage the string?
     
  2. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    You could do it every new stringer does. I found that weaving just one ahead makes it easier to weave especially near the top or when no crosses are tensioned. When you get past that the weaving is still pretty easy but when you go to pull the crosses through the main the loops are never long enough and it is much harder to fan the strings as you pull them through. The farther up and down the mains you can fan the crosses the less wear and tear there is on the strings.
     
  3. dominikk1985

    dominikk1985 Legend

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    so you would recommend doing only one string ahead (sorry I'm no native english speaker and sometimes have a little trouble understanding)?
     
  4. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    I would recommend string one ahead and pulling that one ahead leaving enoug room only to tension the string. That enables the least wear and tear on the strings. Then fan through that last couple of feet with long fanning and weave in the next cross.
     
  5. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    Short answer is: Try it and you'll quickly find out why no one does it.

    You have to leave "loops" of string to grab the further ahead you go, and the friction is huge, so you have to fan ("V" shape) the strings a lot. It'll most likely be slower than just stringing one ahead.
     
  6. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    This sums it up perfectly.
     
  7. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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  8. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I usually like to pre-weave one complete cross, but I'll start the string on the next cross after that by only weaving it through maybe three or four mains. When I leave the end of the string there in the string bed, I can quickly grab it and finish that cross instead of taking those couple of seconds on every cross to "find" the end and thread it. I guess I'll call that my "holding weave".

    I usually stop doing this as I get down near the last crosses, since there's less room in the string bed. It leaves a second loop out the other side of the frame as the crosses are running in, but it's certainly manageable for me. It's just less tedious when the end is right there ready to grab 'n go. Compared to a complete pre-woven cross, this little holding weave runs much more diagonally toward the throat so that it's not in the way of the full pre-weave before it.
     
  9. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    ^^When you do that you have a long loop of string hanging down to get caught on anything and everything. So I drop the long end down on the floor and step on it. Can't get around it there are issues no matter what you do.
     
  10. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    ^^^It actually leaves me with a couple of not-so-big loops that are easy to manage. If they got caught on everything, I wouldn't use this method to keep track of the string end, but it's made the process of installing the crosses quicker and easier for me.
     
  11. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    You ever tried just holding the string end in your pinky/ring finger rolled up against your palm? Another alternative is just to bite the end of the string. Some people find that especially gross, so I won't blame you if you don't want to try it ;)

    I've also heard of a sweat band tuck, but I've never bothered trying that one. I just strongly believe it's slower to string any more than one ahead due to the amount of fiddling and friction to pull the string(s) through.
     
  12. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    This "holding weave" did make too much friction when I first started trying it, just because I went across too many mains. Since I only need to leave the end of the string handy to knock out the next cross, this works well when I only weave a couple of mains and also run it down toward the throat instead of going perpendicular to the mains.

    The general idea for me is to avoid having to find the end of the string and start threading it for each cross. Once I take the slack out of the "pre-weave" and it's ready to be tensioned, I don't have to "zhoop-zhoop-zhoop" to the end of the string, run it through the grommet and start the next pre-weave. It's already sitting there ready to be finished. Since I already have the end in my hand after the full pre-weave, I can pop it into that next holding weave where it's out of the way, but ready to weave as soon as the previous cross is done.

    I think the trick is leaving the end handy in one way or another without it getting in the way and bogging down the progress.
     
  13. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    I just drop the end on the floor. After tensioning I start from the frame and pull the string through my hand until I find the tip for starting the next cross. I feel that way I avoid excessive twisting in the string that cause problems. The last thing I am concerned with is stringing the racket faster.
     
  14. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    This is actually a good idea for stringing gut. I would recommend people to do this at least a few times a frame (and moreso near the end of the frame). I am more utilitarian, though. Speed is good as long as no sacrifices are made on quality (it's a stringer's duh statement, I guess). If I have a pile 10+ waiting to be done, and I'm not getting paid by the hour, I'll whip through them as fast as I can, as long as no corners are cut. I actually like the challenge of eliminating waste in my process, but I can imagine this would kill the 'therapeutic'/relaxing feel for those that get that way from stringing ;)
     
  15. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Avoiding that twisting is very good thing!
     
  16. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Especially when it is captured in the end of a string and causes a kink right up next to the grommet on the other side of the racket. When you pull tension and hear that snap when the string straightens out you know something was wrong.

    Also when I am pulling a string that enters or exits the frame right next to a main or crosses a string out the outside of the frame I like to completely pull it through so the string does not twist up crossing the racket and you see the twisted string in the racket.
     

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