Pro Playing style in the futrure

Discussion in 'General Pro Player Discussion' started by zorg, Apr 27, 2005.

  1. zorg

    zorg Professional

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    In the future, do you think we will go more towards the Federer all court game, or get much more powerful and not really be able to use a 1HBH and everyone will just play the power game? What are your thoughts?
     
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  2. joeman957

    joeman957 Rookie

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    Either everyone reverts back to small wooden rackets and plays with extreme finesse, or everyone will be extremely buff and play with Babolat Pure Drives, with serves that are over 150 mph.
     
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  3. Exile

    Exile Professional

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    In about 10 years, we see the 180-200 mph serve and 145 mph returns.
     
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  4. zorg

    zorg Professional

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    Yeah, I mean what idiot will run out on the court, today, with a woden racket, against someone like Andy Roddick. Murder. Only a rule change in tennis will make players play with wooden frames.
     
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  5. Docalex007

    Docalex007 Hall of Fame

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    No, not in 10 years. 200mph serves?? sounds insane? yes. Impossible no BUT we humans can only take so much....trying to actually "see" and react to a 200mph fireball is reaching human capability...assuming all court dimensions and rules stay the same.

    Wish i had a 200mph down the T. no chance for anyone......only aces and mis-hits

    I can't wait to see the game in the future....however it is...i'll be well updated and in the mix.
     
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  6. aj_m2009

    aj_m2009 Professional

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    Zorg, I would!!!:p According to Tennis Magazine they will be using would racquets, but they also said Navratilova will still be playing in 30 years so I don't know if I should trust them lol.
     
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  7. USCfan

    USCfan Professional

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    If I had a 200 mph serve, I think I might hit some into the body too...
     
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  8. USCfan

    USCfan Professional

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    I don't think anyone will even get close to 200 though...that's a pretty ridiculous number.
     
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  9. 35ft6

    35ft6 Legend

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    In the future genetically enhanced athletes will use virtual reality to practice returning 160 mph serves with ease. In 2054 a player will hit a serve so hard that the ball will cause a tear in space time, creating a hole into a different dimension, allowing an army of highly intelligent ****sexual rabbits to swarm through and conquer our planet by nibbling away our military. Also, everybody will own a blimp and there will be a Starbuck's in every house.

    In all seriousness, there's a gotta be a limit to how fast a groundstroke can be hit, and we've gotta be seeing something pretty close to that. I don't think we'll ever see the end of one-handed backhands.
     
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  10. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    As rackets keep getting more powerful and players keep getting bigger and stronger, the game has become more 1 dimensional. (baseline blasting) Since sports are based on ratings and endorsements, some of the proposed changes will need to be incorporated to help increase fan popularity and thus sales profit$. I think we see some changes that will help bring back more touch, control, S/V and all court players in the future. Some of these changes may include court surfaces, balls, net height, court dimensions and/or racket restrictions. What do you think would happen to Americas Game, baseball, if they let the hitters use aluminum or even hypercarbonTI bats ?
     
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  11. soyelmocano

    soyelmocano Rookie

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    I read an article once talking about reaction time and what would be the threshold (more or less) where even the best returners wouldn't be able to react. There limits to how fast the brain can process info and send the signal to move. Will that ever be reached? I hope not.
     
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  12. 35ft6

    35ft6 Legend

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    But with that said, arguably the hardest hitter in the game, Safin, uses a racket known for playing very similar to wood, Prestige Classic. It's definitely not a power racket.
     
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  13. splink779

    splink779 Guest

    And J.Johansson still serves with major speed with an RDX 500. I saw Federer hit a 109 mph forehand winner against Gonzalez in Monte-Carlo. His racquet is no pure drive.
     
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  14. muklucke

    muklucke Rookie

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    In the future, i think the ATP or some other governing body will have to put limits on rackets. maybe even the balls to keep things around where they are. They way tennis and its technology is progressing, something needs to be done.
     
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  15. Datacipher

    Datacipher Banned

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    That serve still wasn't as good as the time controversy reigned at Wimbledon when Christian Sampras sent both a 289mph ace and his sheared off arm into the service box on match point. Jaden Agassi was denied a let.
     
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  16. Datacipher

    Datacipher Banned

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    In all seriousness, that is true and quite frankly, in realistic terms, I'm not sure we're that far away from it now. Having said that, I don't think the serves will get a great deal faster, unless 1.the size of athletes continues to increase 2.higher tech racquets start being used more and more on the tour. 3.Drugs and/or genetic enhancements create superior capabilities. Just like pitching in baseball, I think we've come pretty close to maxing out on arm speed.
     
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  17. 35ft6

    35ft6 Legend

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    I can maybe see somebody with a body like Kevin Garnett coming on the scene with the most monstrous serve ever. The disguise and uncommon angle of approach of Karlovic, but with way more heat. But I don't expect to see a huge increase in baseline power anytime ever.

    The level of athleticism could greatly increase. Sorry, but in terms of sheer athletic ability the best of the ATP is mediocre compared to the best in the NBA, NFL, and world class track and field. So in that regard we probably haven't "seen anything yet."
     
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  18. Camilio Pascual

    Camilio Pascual Hall of Fame

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    It will continue to go more towards a power baseliner game. S&V is a tactic nowadays in the pros rather than a basic style of playing tennis, which it still is in the amateur game.
    These discussions almost always come down to the tennis players' true fear...the powerful serve.
    If there are changes made to the game because of too much power, it will be because of the serve, not increasingly more powerful groundstrokes.
     
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  19. Markus Kaila

    Markus Kaila Rookie

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    It sounds that you think that increasingly more powerful groudstrokes are a real problem not the power serves! I try to guess that there are in one tennis match (200 points together) 50-100 such kind of serves which the returner cannot get to grips properly with. Respectively there are perhaps 2-5 such kind of groundstrokes (from the baseline to the the baseline) which are impossible to the opponent! Even the fastest groundstrokes cannot be any problem for tennis ever , because I am sure that there will be the net on the court as long we shall have tennis....
     
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  20. Lambsscroll

    Lambsscroll Professional

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    We won't see 200mph. Racquets have reached their peak as far as stiffness and how light they can be. Are you telling me players will use racquets that are 8 ounces to get that extra pop on the serve. Nah.
     
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  21. Camilio Pascual

    Camilio Pascual Hall of Fame

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    Don't know where you got that, I don't think the more powerful groundstrokes are a problem. I'm a typical WTA fan in that regard.
     
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  22. BERDI4

    BERDI4 Semi-Pro

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    Federer's style is going to disappear. We're going to see the Agassi style of groundstrokes: power and hitting the ball on the rise. One handed backands will go extinct too. Racquets will continue improoving: more power, stability and control. We're going to see a pure power game. Faster serves. Touch and drop shots will dissapear too, as players will be faster.
     
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  23. ferrari_827

    ferrari_827 Professional

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    I agree that the trend will continue with the power baseline/serve game becoming the predominant style of play.

    Federer's style is a blip on the map in my opinion. Not only that, someone has to play this all-court style *extremely well* to survive against the power baseline/serve game, and there a few who are talented enough to do it.

    As for rackets improving alot, I think not. There are certain parameters which limit racket specs (stiffness, head size, length, mass) so there is a ceiling on performance. I think we may have reached it already.
     
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  24. 0.2RatedPlayer

    0.2RatedPlayer Rookie

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    i saw a program on espn talking about the future atheletes, and they were talking about how much taller and stronger all of them will be. so yeah, i could see a baseline bashing game become the norm.
     
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  25. zorg

    zorg Professional

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    The average serve, I think, only got faster by about 30 MPH in the last 30 years. So, a too big of a change in the next 10-15 years cannot be expected...
     
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  26. whistleway

    whistleway Semi-Pro

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    In 2042, the most popular sport in the intergallatic universe would be RPG, (Role Playing Game) as well as World Video Championship.. (ahh, along with poker and fishing too) ;) simply because, there are not enough folks to play. Tennis??


    Also, see Tennis in 2020 by BBC
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/front_page/3696988.stm
     
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  27. Breaker

    Breaker Legend

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    Aww...So no room for counterpunchers in the future :( . Then tennis will be replaced by the one obstacle in its path for America...Competitive eating. These "athletes" will have so much stomach capacity that stuffing 10 hot dogs down your throat in 5 seconds will be laughable...
     
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  28. KuramaIX

    KuramaIX Rookie

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    Gosh I love this thread. It's full of funny STUFF ;
     
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  29. AAAA

    AAAA Hall of Fame

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    The clay-court surface more than any other surface is keeping the drop-shot alive. All the players with elite clay-court skills can hit excellent drop shots. The so-called 'mindless power bashing' game will never win Rolland Garros. The player must work the angles with a few well placed shots to create an opening for a winner. Roddick's success on grass and hard-court is one notable example of how the mindless power bashing game is feasible on grass and hard-court.
     
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  30. erik-the-red

    erik-the-red Semi-Pro

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    Half of the Top 10 take advantage of new technology. Three of these five use Babolat Drive racquets, and the other two use the O3 Tour.

    The other half use classic, old school racquets (e.g. The SRD Tour 90, The PS 6.0, The PC600).

    I don't fully buy into the "racquet technology improvement" theory.
     
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  31. callitout

    callitout Professional

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    #31
  32. Markus Kaila

    Markus Kaila Rookie

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    #32
  33. Kobble

    Kobble Hall of Fame

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    Bigger serve and better fitness.
     
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  34. Markus Kaila

    Markus Kaila Rookie

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    I disagree you with your second point (better fitness). It can be really vice versa! (Top tennis players need less fitness in the future!)

    And I don't think that it would be good for a public picture of tennis as an athletic sport if for example Longfellow "Giraffe" Tallson (the name has been changed) could win still at the age of 40 (or 50!) those players who are best then with so simple " I do nothing else but hold my serve without running even one meter" - strategy!

    No differencies between top tennis players and golf players as to an outward presence in the future!

    I believe that at the latest then Walter C. Wingfield would turn in his grave: "What have they done to my sport!"

    Besides you can read this opinion ("What's That Racket? How high-tech equipment is destroying tennis. By Nick Schulz"):

    http://slate.msn.com/id/2103263/
     
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  35. Markus Kaila

    Markus Kaila Rookie

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    Mark Miles' thoughts about pro playing style in the future!

    "Tennis players will be bigger and so will the courts

    By 2010 most of the top male tennis players in the world will be at
    least 6ft 6in tall, prompting the game's rulers to enlarge the court
    and raise the net.

    So says Mark Miles, chief executive of the ATP Tour, the governing
    body of the international men's tennis circuit. He believes the trend
    towards bigger, taller players - such as Mark Philippoussis and Marat
    Safin, who are both 6ft 4in - will continue, as will the emphasis on
    power and pace in the the modern game.

    'Over a period of time athletes in all sports have been getting
    fitter, faster and stronger and it's common sense that there will a
    time will come when all sports, tennis in particular, have to make
    some adjustments,' Miles says. 'If you are standing on the baseline,
    both the trajectory of the ball and the height of the net look very
    different to a player who's 5ft 6in than they do to one who's a foot
    taller.

    'As players' size has grown, it's as if the net has been lowered and
    the lines of the court have been brought closer together. That will
    eventually impact on both the way we play and the geometry of the
    court, because the dimensions of the court are getting smaller.'"
    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

    But does Mark Miles really mean that there ought to be separate courts for
    women (or children) and men? Impossible and expensive!

    This kind of court would be suitable for men, women and children!
    http://www.helsinki.fi/~jpheikki/3malli/kenttae.jpg
     
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  36. Markus Kaila

    Markus Kaila Rookie

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    And in September 555 times! Very nice, my friends (and my enemies, too). (For the latter ones: ) Still I am very interested in arguable critics and for example "It will never happen" doesn't fulfil that requirement at all....
     
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  37. Dilettante

    Dilettante Hall of Fame

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    I agree. Claycourt game is all about point construction. A player who just returns balls waiting for the opponent errors, won't pass many rounds at Roland Garros. He will be dominated and easily crushed by a true claycourt specialist who constructs points.

    The one and only weapon that allows you to expect a (decisive) number of UE's from the rival is Nadal's alike topspin. And even Nadal has huge point construction skills.

    Look Puerta: he's not one of my favourite players (among the Argentians I prefer Coria and others), but during the FO final he just showed that he's a master constructing points from zero. He has powerful groundstrokes, but he didn't just send powerful-but-blind balls to Nadal. He shot loads of angles, he worked every point to send his rival off from the court. And, for Nadal, he made a lot of money with his topspin, that's true. But he was perfectly able to finish a point with every possible kind of forehand winners (in every kind of angle), passing shots, on the run shots, drop shots, even with some winner backhands.

    On clay, you can't really success just with a huge serve and a subsequent volley/single angle shot. You'll need your brain to find a way of displace your rival. As AAAA said, you'll never win the French Open with a brainless game, because there are too many claycourt specialists out there who know how to sweep a brainless retriever off from the court.

    The idea of some people calling baseline game "brainless" is just a falacy. And I'm tempted to say that the most "brainless" kind of game has nothing to do with the baselining.

    I also see a baseline game's future, but that's because that kind of game is more effective. Federer himself is a baseliner most of the time. He's capable of an all-court game, but as a resource, not as a continued style of play. He plays the ultimate tennis that we know: a baseline game in which all-courting is another weapon to add to the arsenal.
     
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  38. @wright

    @wright Hall of Fame

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    Please tell me what "the futrure" is, and then I will give you my opinion on how pros will play...
     
    #38
  39. rlbjr

    rlbjr Rookie

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    Unless they change the geometry of the court, tennis ten or twenty years from now will be largely the same as it is today. The pendulum of style and strategy will continue to swing back and forth between baseline and net just as it has for the last hundred years. Speed of the ball will top out due to the sheer constraints of physics. The real difference equipment has made in the game, and what has led to the demise of the serve/volley style is the return of serve, not the serve. Still, it was only a couple of years ago that a serve/volley player beat the best returner of all time to win the US Open. The determining factor is what is being taught and encouraged at the grass roots level. How much better a player would Roddick be if he had been encouraged or even forced to come to net behind his huge serve or big forehand at an early age? The peolple helping Sampras as a junior didn't much care about junior results and Sampras was encouraged to make several changes in mid course that allowed him to become the player he did. At 13 or 14 Pete was just another ground pounding junior with a two handed backhand.

    As coaches and kids alike see alternative styles of play gain success in the pros, then those styles will be taught and adopted by new young players. The penduluum will awing the other way.
     
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  40. 35ft6

    35ft6 Legend

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    I don't think the game is going to get any more predictable than now, personally. I'm hoping that in a few years we'll see a new group of guys who grew up idolizing Federer, guys who'll try to play a more varied game.
     
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  41. MHK

    MHK New User

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    Indeed. As far as I can make out from reading, in the 70's there was often criticism of the interminable rallys that would go on for minutes, players moonballing all over the place. In the mid 90's, commentators were lamenting the demise of rallys - big servers (often serve-volleyers at that) like Ivanisevich, Sampras, Kraijek etc. were dominating and the talk was of rule changes.

    Now they are talking about the demise of serve-volley, where there are big serves but little coming in to the net. Of course the reality was surely much more subtle than that and the game in any of these eras could nver be generalised. Surely the game will always ebb and flow in this way
     
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