Pro Racquets - High or Low Powered

Discussion in 'Pros' Racquets and Gear' started by Pioneer, May 25, 2010.

  1. Pioneer

    Pioneer Professional

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    The majority of people seem to think that players use very low powered racquets with "lots of control" but when I analyzed some setups I realized most aren't so low powered. Take Federer for example - he strings at about 22 kg with gut/poly. This powerful string setup is balanced out by a low swingweight and small headsize. Sampras - very high tension but all gut and a very heavy racquet/SW. Then what about people like Djokovic and Soderling with near-380 swingweights and medium tensions? These seem like powerful setups. Not to mention the Babolat guys - they are definitely power-oriented.

    So the question arises - how do they control such powerful setups?
     
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  2. mtr1

    mtr1 Professional

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    They have perfect technique, and have been using the same racquet for years.
     
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  3. Nanshiki

    Nanshiki Hall of Fame

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    Every pro is different. Period.
     
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  4. Pioneer

    Pioneer Professional

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    There are certain patterns that all of them follow to achieve success
     
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  5. decades

    decades Guest

    yes the trend is for more high powered racquets with lower powered strings. I believe you will see more and more of this in the future.
     
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  6. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    On P1, Nate Fergueson commented that he strung a frame for Sampras at 75 all poly.
     
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  7. Pioneer

    Pioneer Professional

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    Well, Sampras' stick is 400 grams so all the power from that frame would demand a high tension. Imagine if he strung at 20kg - he'd be killing the crowd
     
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  8. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    One common theme on men's is high weights...12+ oz. coupled with softer frames.
    Big hoops for baseliners.
    Smaller hoops for serve and/or volleyers.
    Mostly headlight.
    Tensions 49 thru 70, but mostly highest 50's and slightly up. Consider...Nadal and Fed lower tension really means they only use NEW stringjobs, don't use the racket once string tension drops.
    Most of us cannot swing that heavy a racket, so it is NOT high powered for us.
    Few pros go lower than mid 11oz...after weighting.
    Talking men's pros.
    Fast swing speeds don't work with big stiff rackets. There is LESS power with big light stiff hoops when you can swing fast.
    Slow swing speeds don't work with small, soft rackets, as the racket doesn't provide enough power with slow swing speeds.
    Who are you?
     
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  9. Nanshiki

    Nanshiki Hall of Fame

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    Not really. Tension, weight, and string jobs very widely. So do grip sizes, head sizes, string patterns, etc...

    Most of the men use poly of some sort, in some way, though. All pros need control, but they all get it different ways.
     
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  10. Nanshiki

    Nanshiki Hall of Fame

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    If you can't swing a 12.5 ounce racquet, you're a six year-old girl.
     
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  11. (K)evin

    (K)evin Rookie

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    federer uses sw2 too
     
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  12. Lsmkenpo

    Lsmkenpo Hall of Fame

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    It is a misconception that players frames are not powerful, players frames are the most powerful racquets in the sweetspot you can buy.

    Here is a power map to prove it:

    We have the Wilson k90 vs. Gamma Big Bubba vs. Boris Becker 11SE

    The k90 and Gamma have almost identical power in the sweetspot and the BB11SE which is weighted to pro specs is probably the most powerful racquet in the sweetspot sold at TW.

    http://twu.tennis-warehouse.com/cgi-bin/comparepower.cgi?racquetA=K61T90|90|Wilson|KSix-One:Tour:90|RCWILSON|&racquetB=GBUBBA|137|Gamma|Big:Bubba|RCGAMMA|x&racquetC=B11SE|98|Boris%20Becker|Becker:11:Special:Edition:98|RCVOLKL|x&racquetD=none
     
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  13. ronalditop

    ronalditop Hall of Fame

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    I believe that pros' racquets are medium/high powered but with lots of control.
     
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  14. KiNG

    KiNG Rookie

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    Pros use high powered racquets. Not super high, but higher than most thought.

    Weight = Power
    Pros control their shots by using SPIN.

    I have no idea how people define CONTROL.
    Different racquets offer different levels of power, but not control. Its the players who provide control. Racquet itself doesn't come with control, its just how it suits you and how you use it. If one racquet offers more control than the other, then every single pro will be using this one racquet for sure.

    Look, we have TW university measuring every racquets power level and such. But I dont see anyone able to measure how much control a racquet has or have a unit for control.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2010
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  15. Pioneer

    Pioneer Professional

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    Spin on one hand, high swingweight on the other. With the high swingweight you can point the ball at any direction no matter how heavy it came to you.
     
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  16. Pioneer

    Pioneer Professional

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    No way man. No way such a strong guy's swing could be slowed down by a 338 swingweight.
     
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  17. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Nanshiki....
    90% of the rackets sold throughout the world are big, stiff, sub 10.5 oz snowshoes.
    The rest are 12+ oz player's rackets.
    Ask any racket company.
    I guess lots of 6 year old girls buy tons of rackets.
     
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  18. Larrysümmers

    Larrysümmers Hall of Fame

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    this made me laugh.
     
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  19. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

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    the FRAME is low powered. the CUSTOMIZATION adds the power/control the player likes.
     
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  20. Nanshiki

    Nanshiki Hall of Fame

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    So? What's your point? 90% of the people who play tennis suck; it doesn't mean you should base the racquet you choose on the kind that gets sold the most.
     
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  21. Lsmkenpo

    Lsmkenpo Hall of Fame

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    The difference in power between players frames, tweeners, and oversized is not much in shots hit in the sweetspot.

    Tweeners and oversized frames simply have more power spread out over a larger area of the frame.(larger sweetspot).

    The perceived problem with lack of power in a players frame is not due to the racquet, it is due to the fact that some players do not hit in the sweetspot consistently to use the power of the players frame. They blame the racquet for lack of power when the problem is the player.
     
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  22. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I think you're wrong.
    If a good player with a fast swing uses a big stiff hoop, they will lose power, but more importantly, they will also lose control.
    If a good player with a SLOW swing uses a big, stiff hoop, they will gain power, and not lose much control.
    Nanshiki....just how good ARE you? There's TONS of 5.0 players using 11 oz rackets. There's a bunch of 5.5 using 11 oz rackets.
    There are 7.0 women using 9.8 oz rackets!
    They would all CRUSH you infinite bagels....:shock::shock:
     
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  23. decades

    decades Guest

    not really. If that were true everybody would be using 90sq player's frames. they aren't! there is a difference!
     
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  24. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Also wrong....
    The big stiff hoops are used by slowswinging lower level players who THINK their rackets hit with good power when mishit slightly.
    Lower level players don't know!
    A small soft hoop does hit weaker when mishit, and the better player KNOWS it does.
    And no fast swinging better player would ever use a big stiff hoop because it not only give LESS control and power, but it mishits with more torque and can injure the player more.
    A slow swinging bad player cannot injure himself with such a slow swing, and isn't good enough to swing fast enough to use a smaller headed, softer racket!
    :shock::shock:
     
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  25. Nanshiki

    Nanshiki Hall of Fame

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    The answer to that question is sort of complicated, but long story short is "kind of but not really." Which is so say that if you edited enough footage of me practicing, you could make a pretty decent highlight real, but I probably would have lost because of unforced errors anyway. The fact that I personally use a racquet in the 13 ounce-ish range due to my preferences doesn't change the fact that someone who can't physically swing a 12 ounce-racquet is a little girl.

    I didn't say there weren't. Most of them are using something in the 11.3 to 12.8 range, though. Slightly higher if you include the eight or nine grams of an overgrip and a string damper.


    There are 7.0 women using 9.8 oz rackets!
    [/quote]

    Yes...again, most of them are using something in the mid 11 to 12 ounce range. 20 years ago, those women were all using ~13+ oz racquets. So what's your point?

    Probably, but more because of me double faulting and making UE a lot, not because I'm using a heavy racquet. I don't really know how my lack of match play prowess has to do with the discussion.

    My argument stands; if you cannot physically swing a 12.5 ounce tennis racquet, you are either a small child or are suffering from severe muscle degeneration.
     
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